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NEW: Execution by Styrax in Ancient Thasos by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+42 pages; 33 figures, 5 graphs (27 plates presented in full colour). 86 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692129. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692136. Book contents pageDownload

Searching through interdisciplinary research to recover echoes of the human condition ingrained as they may be in the skeletal record of the ancients, there have been few cases in the forty year experience of the author which in defiance to the relentless passage of Chrόnos and even the chthonic potency of the waters of Léthe to dissolve all strings relating to Mnenosỳne could offer compelling evidentiary data, critical for generating meaningful interpretive answers as a nexus to life pathways and experiences in antiquity, reflective of dynamics and circumstances, that were not always possible to be recorded or spoken of by the attendants of Cléo. And yet in rare cases, millennia later, ostensibly through the works of Láchesis, a synergy between the fields of Archaeological Anthropology and Bioarchaeology may offer a unique portal whereby the dictum mortui vivos docent may be reiterated.

Sharing in the objectives of an ongoing archaeo-anthropological endeavor, aiming to better decipher and elucidate facets of the human condition while carrying out funerary archaeological research of Hellenistic to Roman periods family graves at the extensive ancient necropolis of Thasos, the most northern Aegean island, this essay addresses a case of unique forensic / bioarchaeological interest involving an older male individual, a member of one of the clusters of burials, who had been placed as a single interment in a most conspicuous limestone cyst grave of the Hellenistic period.

While odontological, cranio-infracranial skeleto-anatomic manifestations and palaeopathologies revealed a detailed rostrum on aspects of his developmental growth, of acquired and degenerative somatic changes, reflective of his life experiences which involved long term most active participations in physically demanding yet specialized activities, a staggering ‘through and through’ sternal trauma of astonishing preservation, provided for a distinct opportunity to conduct a unique cross-disciplinary investigation on the nature of the weapon reconstructed in bronze, the archaeometry on the trajectory and factors of speed and force at the deliverance of the strike, along with the diagnostic assessments of the thoracic tissues pierced consecutively and their moribund consequences.

A review of historical references on the implementation of capital punishment either through the decision of a dicastic or ephetic court, and/or execution carried out as a result of outlawry are evaluated in relevance to funerary practices as these pertained to the interment of the Thasian male within the context of the burial ground, offering in retrospect assessments on the probable cause of his violent death.

About the Author
ANAGNOSTIS P. AGELARAKIS is Professor of Anthropology at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.

In the earlier years of his career, he carried out field and/or lab archaeo-anthropological research projects focusing on the organizational abilities, capacities, and adaptations of the human condition during the Holocene in SE and SW Asia, the Middle East, the American Northeast, and the Caribbean.

The central area of his research remains however the Eastern Mediterranean with emphasis on the ancient world of the Greeks, at the cross roads and sea routes between Africa, Asia, and Europe. Under the domains of Anthropological Archaeology, Funerary Archaeology, Bio-Archaeology and Forensics he studies the biological profiles, the demographic dynamics, and palaeopathological records of human skeletal populations from prehistoric periods to the late medieval era. Based on the skeletal record, he i
Aprovechamiento de vertebrados terrestres por las poblaciones humanas que habitaron la costa del Golfo San Matías (Río Negro, Argentina) durante el Holoceno tardío by Hernán A. Marani. Paperback; 175x245mm; 284 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (109 plates in colour). Spanish text with English abstract. 69 2018 South American Archaeology Series 31. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690118. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690125. Book contents pageDownload

This book presents the results and discussion of archaeofaunal studies which took place in the northern San Matías Gulf (Rio Negro Province) during the last six years, focussing on terrestrial mammals and birds. The general objective of this research is to determine what was the mode of operation of terrestrial vertebrates (small and big), and the importance that they had in the survival of human populations that occupied the coastline during the late Holocene (last 3000 years).
Étude paléoanthropologique et analyse des rituels funéraires de deux sites laténiens valaisans Randogne – Bluche et Sion – Parking des Remparts by Tobias Hofstetter. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+240 pages; 171 figs + 6 tables (colour and black & white throughout). French text; English abstract. 444 2018 Laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique UNIGE . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919375. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919382. Book contents pageDownload

This volume concerns the bioanthropological analysis and the investigation of Second Iron Age (also known as the La Tène period: 470–25 BC) funerary practices in central Valais. More precisely, it deals with the study of two necropolises lately discovered in this mountainous region of southern Switzerland: Randogne–Bluche (excavated between 2001 and 2005) and Sion–Parking des Remparts (excavated in 2006). The matter of Second Iron Age funeral practices has been investigated since the late 19th century in Switzerland and has ever since yielded many exceptional finds. In archaeological terms, the research presented in this work introduces a consistent summary of the current archaeological and historiographical state of knowledge regarding Second Iron Age funeral practices in southern Switzerland.

Étude paléoanthropologique et analyse des rituels funéraires de deux sites laténiens valaisans : Randogne – Bluche et Sion – Parking des Remparts porte sur l’analyse bioanthropologique et l’étude des rituels funéraires laténiens en Valais central. Plus précisément, elle traite des ensembles funéraires de Randogne – Bluche (fouillé entre 2001 et 2005) et de Sion – Parking des Remparts (fouillé en 2006). Le premier objectif de cette étude a consisté à attribuer une identité et des caractéristiques biologiques aux individus inhumés au sein de ces deux ensembles. Ensuite, il s’est agi de caractériser ces deux ensembles funéraires par leur insertion au cadre géographique et archéologique, de s’intéresser à leur organisation chronologique et spatiale et à l’architecture des sépultures, ainsi qu’aux positions d’inhumation, de même qu’au mobilier funéraire présent. Par la suite, nous avons développé une vision comparative de ces deux ensembles funéraires, avant de finalement les confronter à l’intégralité du corpus funéraire laténien actuellement connu pour le Valais central et ainsi chercher à proposer une vision synthétique de la question.

About the Author
TOBIAS HOFSTETTER (B.A, M.Sc.) was born in Zürich in 1992. He currently works as consulting bioanthropologist to the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Bioanthropology at the University of Geneva, where he has collaborated in various archaeological fieldwork operations and bioanthropological assessments, covering the Mesolithic to the Middle Ages, in Switzerland, Italy, Bulgaria, Kuwait and Jordan.

TOBIAS HOFSTETTER (BA ; MSc) est né à Zürich (Suisse) en 1992. Il a obtenu son Bachelor en archéologie préhistorique et classique ainsi qu’en anthropologie à l’Université de Neuchâtel (Suisse) en 2013. Il a poursuivi ses études en Master d’archéologie préhistorique et bioanthropologie à l’Université de Genève (Suisse) ; formation qu’il a terminée en 2016. Il travaille couramment en tant que bioanthropologue consultant pour le laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique et d’anthropologie de l’Université de Genève. À ce titre, il a participé à de nombreuses campagnes de fouilles archéologiques et expertises bioanthropologiques, s’étendant du Paléolithique jusqu’à la période médiévale, en Suisse, France, Italie, Bulgarie, Koweït et Jordanie. En parallèle, il a repris un deuxième cursus de Master en histoire et littérature anglaise à l’Université de Neuchâtel.
Treinta años de Arqueología Medieval en España edited by Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+418 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English preface and introduction (Print RRP £64.00). 58 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919238. £64.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919245. Book contents pageDownload

This book presents, in sixteen papers, recent developments and some of the main topics seen in academic Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain. The papers explore some of the emergent and consolidated topics of the discipline, such as landscapes, cities, rural spaces, bio-archaeological records, archaeology of architectures, agrarian archaeology, post-Roman archaeology, colonial archaeology in the Canary Islands and the archaeology of religious minorities, opening new lines of enquiries and providing new theoretical and methodological approaches. An overview of Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain is offered, proposing a wide range of topics for discussion. Finally, the book explores the connections between Spanish Medieval Archaeology and other European traditions, specifically, English, Italian and Portuguese Medieval Archaeology.

About the Editor
Juan Antonio Quirós is a Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country, Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London), and Visiting Fellow at All Souls College (University of Oxford). He is the director of the ‘Heritage and Cultural Landscapes Research Group’ of the University of the Basque Country and the 'Rural Medieval Research Group', CSIC-UPV/EHU. His principal interests lie in the study of the archaeology of landscapes, the archaeology of rural communities, Mediterranean Archaeology, Archaeology of Architectures, and the study of Social Complexity. Besides, he is very interested in a multi-proxy and multidisciplinary approach to cultural resources. Some of his recent works include ‘Arqueología de una comunidad campesina medieval: Zornoztegi’ (Bilbao, 2018); ‘Longhouses, house biography and social complexity in Early Medieval Northwestern Iberia’ (Arqueología de la Arquitectura 2017); ‘Local identities and desertions in Late Medieval period’ (Reti Medievali, 2017); ‘Social complexity in Early Medieval rural communities’ (Oxford, 2016); and ‘Agrarian Archaeology in Early Medieval Europe’ (Quaternary International 346, 2014). Currently, he is preparing a book about the Archaeology of Medieval Peasantry.
Current Approaches to Collective Burials in the Late European Prehistory Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 14/Session A25b edited by Tiago Tomé, Marta Díaz-Zorita Bonilla, Ana Maria Silva, Claudia Cunha and Rui Boaventura. xii+128 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 374 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917210. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917227. Book contents pageDownload

The present volume originated in session A25b (‘Current Approaches to Collective Burials in the Late European Prehistory’) of the XVII World Congress of the International Union of the Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP), held in Burgos in September 2014.

Collective burials are quite a common feature in Prehistoric Europe, with the gathering of multiple individuals in a shared burial place occurring in different types of burial structures (natural caves, megalithic structures, artificial caves, corbelled-roof tombs, pits, etc.). Such features are generally associated with communities along the agropastoralist transition and fully agricultural societies of the Neolithic and Chalcolithic.

For a long time, human skeletal remains exhumed from collective burials were dismissed as valuable sources of information, their studies being limited mostly to morphological assessments and subsequent classification in predefined ‘races’. They currently represent a starting point for diversified, often interdisciplinary, research projects, allowing for a more accurate reconstruction of funerary practices, as well as of palaeobiological and environmental aspects, which are fundamental for the understanding of populations in the Late Prehistory of Europe and of the processes leading to the emergence of agricultural societies in this part of the world.

The articles in this volume provide examples of different approaches currently being developed on Prehistoric collective burials of southern Europe, mostly focusing on case studies, but also including contributions of a more methodological scope.
A Dignified Passage through the Gates of Hades The Burial Custom of Cremation and the Warrior Order of Ancient Eleutherna by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. 24pp; illustrated throughout in colour. 15 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913830. £8.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913847. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological excavations at the Eleuthernian burial ground of Orthi Petra continue to yield significant elements of the archaeo-anthropological record, the subject matter of continuous interdisciplinary research, outreach, national and international acclaim. Among a plethora of features discovered, unearthing components of a unique nexus to the Geometric-Archaic Periods, was an unspoiled time capsule in astonishing contextual preservation, a hand carved tomb with a drómos into the softer bedrock material of Orthi Petra. Designated in short as contextual association A1K1, the tomb as a funerary activity area yielded a remarkable collection of jar burials in complex internal tomb stratification, containing cremated human bones accompanied by a most noteworthy assembly of burial artifacts of exquisite wealth, along a multitude of traces of “fossilized” behavior left resolutely behind by the ancients in their transactions on the paths of their perceived realities and obligations of life norms, but also of the arcane matters of afterlife. Such evidentiary data of funerary behavior in conjunction with the rest of the archaeo-anthropological record afford the opportunity to document where possible and deduce where pertinent aspects of the transitional period, overlapping the end of life’s journey and the unfolding of death in light of a number of the principles, the values, and the modes that guided the lives of the ancients as mortuary habits may have the transcending power to be revealing of certain codes of ante mortem conduct, of main beliefs, of ideologies and viewpoints, characteristic of their ideational world and hence of their attitudes toward, and expectations of, post mortem life. Such understandings, based on critical and deductive thinking combined with the data offered through the scope of anthropological archaeology and forensics by the decoding of traces permanently recorded on bone and dental surfaces, construct a persuasive dialectic, regarding important facets of the human condition in Eleutherna from Geometric through Archaic times.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Geometric Period Plithos Burial Ground at Chora of Naxos Island, Greece: Anthropology Report by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. 94 pages; colour graphs throughout. 10 2016 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913038. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913045. Book contents pageDownload

This report aims to offer glimpses of the human condition on Naxos island, Greece, focusing on the archaeoanthropologic study of the human skeletal remains along with associated contexts of faunal materials recovered from the Geometric (9th -7th c BC) component of the burial ground site of Plithos in Chora at Naxos island.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Estudio antropológico de las estructuras cefálicas en una colección osteológica procedente de Chinchero (Perú) An anthropological study of cephalic structures in an osteological collection from Chinchero (Peru) by José I. Herrera Ureña. viii+62 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English abstract. 7 2016 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912710. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912680. Book contents pageDownload

In this work we present an anthropological study of crania and mandibles from the osteological collection from Chinchero (Peru), currently housed at the American Archaeological and Ethnological Museum of the Complutense University of Madrid. From 1968 to 1971, a team of archaeologists of the Spanish Scientific Mission in Hispanic America excavated the site of Chinchero, a small village located in the Andean high plateau near Cusco. As the result of this mission, remains from 8 single burials and two ossuaries dated to pre-colonial times were exhumed and brought to Spain. The excavated area included an ancient palace and several administrative and religious structures built by Tupac Yupanqui, who ruled the Inca Empire between 1471 and 1493. The surroundings of the catholic church, erected over one of these buildings, were excavated as well.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Structured Deposition of Animal Remains in the Fertile Crescent during the Bronze Age by José Luis Ramos Soldado. vi+58 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912727. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912697. Book contents pageDownload

Although most of the animal remains recorded throughout the archaeological excavations consist usually of large assemblages of discarded and fragmented bones, it is possible to yield articulated animal skeletons in some cases. Most of them have been usually picked up from sacred and/or funerary contexts, but not all of them might fit necessarily in ritual and symbolic interpretations, and not all of the structured deposit of animal remains may be explained due to anthropic factors. In addition, zooarchaeology has traditionally focused on animal domestication, husbandry and economy, and species identification above all, shutting out further discussion about these type of findings. Moreover, the limited condition of the data is also another issue to bear in mind. Thus, the aim of this paper has been to draw up a literature review of the structured deposits of animal remains during the third and second millennia BC in the Ancient Near East for its subsequent classification and detailed interpretation. In this survey it has been attested that not only most of the articulated animal remains have been found in ritual and/or funerary contexts but also that all species recorded– but some exceptions–are domestic. Hence, I argue in this paper that there is a broad religious attitude towards the main domesticated animals of human economy in the Ancient Near East, based on the closeness of these animals to the human sphere. Therefore, it seems that domesticated animals were powerful constituents in the cultural landscape of these regions, never simply resources.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Occlusal macrowear, antemortem tooth loss, and temporomandibular joint arthritis at Predynastic Naqada Taken from Palaeopathology in Egypt and Nubia: A century in review by Nancy C. Lovell. Pages 95-106.Download

This paper is based on the results of an examination of crania and mandibles from three cemeteries at Predynastic Naqada, which were excavated by Petrie in 1895. These remains are curated as part of the Duckworth Collection at the University of Cambridge. Patterns of occlusal macrowear, antemortem tooth loss, and lesions of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are described, and are discussed in the contexts of diet and the biomechanics of mastication. The incomplete nature of most of the dentitions restricted the assessment of the pathological conditions, but no statistically significant differences were observed in the prevalence of TMJ arthritis between males and females, nor between elite and non-elite cemetery samples. Furthermore, antemortem tooth loss and occlusal wear were not associated with TMJ lesions.

This paper is taken from Palaeopathology in Egypt and Nubia: A century in review edited by Ryan Metcalfe, Jenefer Cockitt and Rosalie David, Archaeopress 2014. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Shipwrecks and Global ‘Worming’ by P. Palma and L.N. Santhakumaran. ii+62 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout.. Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913151. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913168. Book contents pageDownload

Marine borers, particularly the shipworms, as destroyers of timber, par excellence, are well known from very ancient times. They attacked the wooden hulls of ships with such intensity that the weakened bottom planks broke up even due to a mild impact caused by hitting a rock or any floating objects inducing shipwrecks. Even the survival of sunken ships as wrecks depends on the mercy of wood-destroying organisms, which may turn these ‘port-holes’ to history into meaningless junks. The silent saboteurs, involved in several early shipwrecks, are the molluscan and crustacean borers, aided by bacteria and fungi.

This paper presents an account of the marine wood-borers, together with a historical review of literature on their depredation on wooden ships, and on protective methods adopted from antiquity to modern times. The seriousness with which early mariners faced the problem of bio-deterioration and the fear the wood-borers created in their minds have been brought to light with, in some cases, excerpts from their journals and books. The anxiety and concern for protecting the ships from the ravages of wood-borers and for their own safety, as evidenced from their accounts, are discussed. Classification of various groups of marine wood-borers with notes on characters of systematic value and a complete list of species so far recorded in literature have been included under Appendix I and II. Methods employed to prevent damage to the boats included deep-charring, coating with pitch, coal-tar, whale oil and mustard oil with lime; scupper nailing (‘filling’); sheathing with animal skin, hair, tarred paper, wooden boards (untreated or soaked in coal tar, Ferrous sulphate, Copper sulphate or Lead monoxide); sheathing with metals (Lead or Copper sheets); plastic, neoprene coated ply-woods; and painting with Copper oxide, Pentachlorophenol or phenylarsenious oxide. None of these imparts complete protection. Recent archaeological investigations carried out in British waters, especially on ‘Mary Rose’, are also summarised. It is suggested that, though borers are instrumental in inducing ship-wrecks thereby enriching the materials for archaeological studies, excavations at known ship-wreck sites should be augmented to unearth valuable historical data, before they are lost to satisfy the insatiable appetite of these pests.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

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