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NEW: Parian Polyandreia: The Late Geometric Funerary Legacy of Cremated Soldiers’ Bones on Socio-Political Affairs and Military Organizational Preparedness in Ancient Greece by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. xii+400 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 colour plates). 375 2017. ISBN 9781784917197. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The anthropological study of two late 8th century BC monumental graves, designated as T144 and T105, at the ancient necropolis of Paroikia at Paros, initially intended to investigate inter-island features of the human condition, observable as ingrained traces in the human skeletal record, as it may have related to the Parian endeavors in the northern Aegean for the colonization of Thasos.

Through the ‘Paros Polyandreia Anthropological Project,’ it was possible to retrieve insights into aspects of the human environments and experiences that had transpired in a Parian context, elucidated by a considerable population sample of cremated male individuals, transcending to broader features that would have involved Thasos; discerning further facets of the human condition during the Late Geometric to the Early Archaic periods in the ancient Hellenic world.

This book integrates the basic anthropological data, evaluations and assessments derived from the study of the human skeletal record of Polyandreia T144, and T105. Bioarchaeological and forensic anthropological research results include the morphometric analyses of biological developmental growth and variability in relation to manifestations of acquired skeleto-anatomic changes, along with inquiries into the demographic dynamics, and the palaeopathologic profile of the individuals involved. Such intra-site data juxtaposed afforded the possibility to deliberate on issues of the preparedness, intended purpose, function, and symbolic meaning of the funerary activity areas and to reflect on the organizational abilities and capacities of the political and military affairs of the Parians.

Moreover, inter-site evaluations where relative with the burial grounds of Orthi Petra of Eleutherna-Crete, Plithos of Naxos, Athenian Demosion Sema, Pythagoreion of Samos, and Rhodes offer comparisons on taphonomy, on cremated materials’ metric analyses, and on aspects of the funerary customs and practices in the interring of cremated war dead.
NEW: Current Approaches to Collective Burials in the Late European Prehistory Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 14/Session A25b edited by Tiago Tomé, Marta Díaz-Zorita Bonilla, Ana Maria Silva, Claudia Cunha and Rui Boaventura. xii+128 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 374 2017. ISBN 9781784917210. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The present volume originated in session A25b (‘Current Approaches to Collective Burials in the Late European Prehistory’) of the XVII World Congress of the International Union of the Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP), held in Burgos in September 2014.

Collective burials are quite a common feature in Prehistoric Europe, with the gathering of multiple individuals in a shared burial place occurring in different types of burial structures (natural caves, megalithic structures, artificial caves, corbelled-roof tombs, pits, etc.). Such features are generally associated with communities along the agropastoralist transition and fully agricultural societies of the Neolithic and Chalcolithic.

For a long time, human skeletal remains exhumed from collective burials were dismissed as valuable sources of information, their studies being limited mostly to morphological assessments and subsequent classification in predefined ‘races’. They currently represent a starting point for diversified, often interdisciplinary, research projects, allowing for a more accurate reconstruction of funerary practices, as well as of palaeobiological and environmental aspects, which are fundamental for the understanding of populations in the Late Prehistory of Europe and of the processes leading to the emergence of agricultural societies in this part of the world.

The articles in this volume provide examples of different approaches currently being developed on Prehistoric collective burials of southern Europe, mostly focusing on case studies, but also including contributions of a more methodological scope.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
The Mycenaean Cemetery at Agios Vasileios, Chalandritsa, in Achaea by Konstantina Aktypi with contributions by Olivia A. Jones and Vivian Staikou. xii+296 pages; 287 figures, 8 tables, 3 maps (163 plates in colour). 367 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916978. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916985. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean chamber-tomb cemetery at Agios Vasileios, near Chalandritsa in Achaea, was first investigated by Nikolaos Kyparissis in the late 1920s, followed by small-scale research in 1961 by Efthimios Mastrokostas. In the years 1989–2001 more rescue excavations were conducted by the Greek Archaeological Service, revealing 30 chamber tombs, some looted. Based mostly on the latest research, this study is the first major presentation of the cemetery and its finds. The topographical data are presented in chapter A, including the most important ancient sites in the region. Chapters B to E deal with the 45 chamber tombs and with the assemblage of the 260 artefacts found in them. The chipped stone assemblage and the ground stone implements are presented in chapter F by Vivian Staikou. Chapter G, by Olivia A. Jones, deals with the human skeletal remains, focussing on burial customs and practices. Chapters H and I handle the discussion and the concluding remarks, respectively. A series of 3D representations and photorealistic illustrations are presented, based on the original plans and architectural drawings of the tombs, to produce a visual appreciation of the important cemetery, unfortunately no longer visible.

About the Author
Konstantina Aktypi obtained her BA in Archaeology at the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and Certificates in Heritage Management, Administration, and Developing Communication Skills and Responses to Crisis. She has participated in projects of intensive archaeological survey and systematic excavations in Achaea and Aitoloakarnania. Since 1995, she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities of Achaea, conducting rescue excavations in the region dating from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman period. From 2002 to 2011 she worked at the excavations of the Mycenaean settlement and chamber tomb cemetery at Voudeni, also holding a supervisorial position for the major restoration works there. Her current research interests include the study of the chamber tombs at Voudeni, an Early Bronze Age settlement near Patras and the two best preserved tholos tombs in Achaea, in the prehistoric cemetery at Rhodia. She is also working on educational programs, introducing students to the art of Archaeology.

Olivia A. Jones obtained a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and History at West Virginia University and a Masters in Aegean Archaeology at University College London. She has worked in academic and contract archaeology projects in the United States and Greece. She is currently completing her doctoral research at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. Her research interests include applying a bioarchaeological approach to Mycenaean mortuary practices.

Vivian Staikou is an archaeologist of the Ephorate of Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. She studied Archaeology and Fine Arts in the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and received an MA in Prehistoric Archaeology from the University of Crete. Over the years she has carried out archaeological fieldwork in Attica, Achaea, Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. Her current research interests include lithic technologies, the Palaeolithic of Western Greece and the archaeology of the island of Lefkas. She also has a particular interest in developing educational programs for children.
Birds, Beasts and Burials: A study of the human-animal relationship in Romano-British St. Albans by Brittany Elayne Hill. vi+204 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 35 colour plates. 333 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 24. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915964. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915971. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The human-animal relationship is one that has been pondered by scholars for ages. It has been used to define both what it means to be human and what it means to be animal. Birds, Beasts and Burials examines human-animal relationships as found in the mortuary record within the area of Verulamium that is now situated in the modern town of St. Albans. Once considered a major centre, the mortuary rites given to its people suggest high variabilities in the approach to the personhood of certain classes of both people and animals. While 480 human individuals were examined, only a small percentage was found to have been afforded the rite of a human-animal co-burial. It is this small percentage that is examined in greater detail. Of major concern are the treatments to both the human and animal pre- and post- burial and the point at which the animal enters into the funerary practice.

About the Author:
Dr Brittany Elayne Hill is an American archaeologist who completed her undergraduate studies at University of Kansas in 2009 before coming to the University of Southampton in 2010 to pursue her master’s degree, which was then followed up by her acceptance to a PhD course in 2011. An ongoing fascination with Romano-British culture and osteology inspired her to engage in research covered in this book. She is particularly pleased by the combined representation of human osteology and zooarchaeology demonstrated in this monograph, as both play roles in the formation of the Romano-British burials found in St. Albans. This is her first monograph and she is excited to release the results of her PhD work to the public sphere for the first time. She is hopeful that the content of this monograph inspires others to consider the influence human-animal relationships have on the formation of ancient and modern cultures alike.
Atlas of Mammal Distribution through Africa from the LGM (~18 ka) to Modern Times The zooarchaeological record by Hélène Jousse. 316 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 309 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915407. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915414. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This work provides the first overview of mammal species distributions in Africa since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18 ky) to modern time. It is derived from data published mainly in the zooarchaeological literature until 2009. During a post-doctoral project hosted in the zoological department of mammal collection at the Naturhistoriches Museum in Vienna (Austria), the occurrences of taxa in archaeological sites on the African continent were recorded in a database, integrating geographical and chronological information. This record offers the opportunity to produce a chronological atlas of mammalian distributions by presenting their occurrences on successive maps over the last 18 ky.

This work is useful for zooarchaeologists dealing with one particular species by providing a bibliographical work that documents its past locations. It must be noted that fauna are mainly documented through their presence at archaeological sites and are therefore tied to the presence of humans and their activities. This may only partially reproduce their true past distribution. However, the sites offer a good coverage throughout space and time and generally reflect the extent of mammalian distributions, although the limits of their distributions may be further refined. The atlas will aid in the investigation of palaeoecological issues, such as the capacity of mammals to adapt to climatic change and respond to human disturbance in the recent past of Africa.

The database also provides information that is fundamental to a better understanding of what influenced the present-day distribution, dynamism and structure of mammalian communities in Africa. By incorporating a larger temporal scale to modern ecological studies, it may help control their conservation since desiccation and human disturbance in Africa is still a worrying question for their future.
Liber Amicorum–Speculum Siderum: Nūt Astrophoros Papers Presented to Alicia Maravelia edited by Nadine Guilhou with the help of Antigoni Maniati. xxvi+374 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 302 2016 Archaeopress Egyptology 17. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915223. £56.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915230. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this volume, a pleiade of Egyptologists, Archaeologists, Archaeoastronomers, Archaeoanthropologists, Historians and other scholars from fifteen countries (Hellas, Egypt, France, Russia, Ukraine, Sweden, Switzerland, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Poland, Hungary, Croatia, Turkey, Australia) have combined their efforts in order to honour Alicia Maravelia, whose important work in Egyptology and in the foundation of the Hellenic Institute of Egyptology are highly acknowledged.

This book, with foreword by His Eminence the Archbishop of Sinai and Abbot of the Holy Monastery of St Catherine, Mgr Damianos, contains thirty original articles, two abstracts and a plethora of accompanying texts including Dr Maravelia’s list of publications. The book is divided into three parts: 1. Nūt and the Realm of Stars [15 contributions]; 2. Ancient Egyptian Religion and its Celestial Undertones [12 contributions]; and 3. Ancient Egyptian Science, Medicine, Archaeoanthropology, Egyptomania, Egyptophilia, etc. [5 contributions].

The reader will find papers that deal mainly with the goddess Nūt and her mythology and cosmographic notions related to her, the stars and other celestial luminaries, orientations of monuments, ancient Egyptian constellations and decans, the notion of time, calendars, religious and funerary observances related to the sky, ancient Egyptian religion, religious and amuletic artefacts, religious mythology, as well as archaeoanthropological and medicinal studies, papers on ancient Egyptian Mathematics, Egyptophilia, Egyptomania and ancient Egyptian collections.
Les sépultures mésolithiques de Téviec et Hoedic: révisions bioarchéologiques by Bruno Boulestin. 292 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914967. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914974. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The sites of Teviec and Hoedic, located in Brittany and excavated from 1928 to 1934 by Marthe and Saint-Just Péquart, have yielded twenty-odd graves dating to the end of the Mesolithic and containing almost forty individuals. Nearly a century later, they remain the most important funerary groups ever discovered in France for this period, and two major French Mesolithic sites. Until these days though, despite previous re-examinations of part of the unearthed material, no general review of the field data or of the human remains had ever been carried out, and all the debates concerning the functioning of both cemeteries relied on the interpretations once made by the Péquart and on the anthropological studies by Marcellin Boule and Henri Victor Vallois. This book presents the long lacking bioarchaeological review study of the Teviec and Hoedic graves: the field data have been reconsidered, relying in particular on a large series of pictures taken by the excavators, and the number of dead individuals, their age and sex have been reevaluated using anthropological techniques in accordance with our current knowledge. This review also gives us the occasion to carry out a global reflection on the circumstances under which the dead were grouped during the Mesolithic period and on the society of Atlantic Europe’s last hunters-gatherers as perceived through the filter of their funerary practices.

About the author:
Bruno Boulestin is an anthropologist at the University of Bordeaux, France, member of the research unit “De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie” (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). He is working on the diachronic study of practices around death in ancient societies from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data and is specialized in the study of bone modifications and corpse treatments.

French Description:
Fouillés entre 1928 et 1934 par Marthe et Saint-Just Péquart, Téviec et Hoedic, en Bretagne, ont livré une vingtaine de tombes datant de la fin du Mésolithique et contenant près de quarante individus. Presque un siècle plus tard, ils demeurent les ensembles funéraires les plus importants de cette période découverts en France, et parmi les sites majeurs du Mésolithique français. Mais jusque-là, si une partie des matériels mis au jour avaient été réexaminés, ni les données de terrain ni les restes humains n’avaient fait l’objet d’une révision générale, et toutes les discussions sur le fonctionnement des deux cimetières s’appuyaient sur les anciennes interprétations des Péquart et sur les études anthropologiques de Marcellin Boule et Henri Victor Vallois. Cet ouvrage présente le travail de révision bioarchéologique des sépultures de Téviec et Hoedic qui faisait jusqu’à présent défaut : les données de terrain y sont reconsidérées, en s’appuyant en particulier sur une importante série de photographies prises par les fouilleurs, et le nombre de morts, leur âge et leur sexe y sont réévalués en utilisant des techniques anthropologiques conformes au savoir actuel. Cette révision est également l’occasion d’une réflexion générale sur les regroupements des morts au Mésolithique, ainsi que sur la société des derniers chasseurs-cueilleurs d’Europe atlantique telle qu’elle est perçue à travers le filtre de leurs pratiques funéraires.

Bruno Boulestin est anthropologue à l’Université de Bordeaux, France, membre de l’UMR 5199 du CNRS PACEA, « De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement et Anthropologie ». Ses recherches portent sur l’étude diachronique des pratiques autour de la mort dans les sociétés anciennes, à partir à la fois des données archéologiques, bioarchéologiques et de l’anthropologie sociale, et il est spécialisé dans l’étude des modifications osseuses et des traitements du cadavre.
Forensic Archaeology The Application of Comparative Excavation Methods and Recording Systems by Laura Evis. viii+240 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout. 289 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914844. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914851. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeological excavation has been widely used in the recovery of human remains and other evidence in the service of legal cases for many years. However, established approaches will in future be subject to closer scrutiny following the announcement by the Law Commission in 2011 that expert evidence will in future be subject to a new reliability-based admissibility test in criminal proceedings. This book evaluates current archaeological excavation methods and recording systems – focusing on those used in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australasia, and North America – in relation to their use in providing forensic evidence, and their ability to satisfy the admissibility tests introduced by the Law Commission, and other internationally recognised bodies.

In order to achieve this aim, two analyses were undertaken. First, attention was directed to understanding the origins, development, underpinning philosophies, and current use of archaeological excavation methods and recording systems in the regions selected for study. A total of 153 archaeological manuals/guidelines were examined from archaeological organisations operating in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. This research indicated that the Stratigraphic Excavation method and Single Context Recording system, the Demirant Excavation method and Standard Context Recording system, the Quadrant Excavation method and Standard Context Recording system, and the Arbitrary Level Excavation method and Unit Level Recording system were the approaches most often used to excavate and record graves.

Second, the four defined methodological approaches were assessed experimentally, using a grave simulation of known properties to test the excavation, recording, and interpretation of material evidence, the definition of stratigraphic contexts, and understanding of stratigraphic relationships. The grave simulation also provided opportunities to measure archaeologists’ narratives of the grave formation process against the known properties of the grave simulation, and to assess whether archaeological experience had any impact on evidence recovery rates.

Fifty repeat excavations were conducted. The results obtained from this experimental study show that the Quadrant Excavation method and Standard Context Recording system was the most consistent, efficient, and reliable archaeological approach to use to excavate and record clandestine burials and to formulate interpretation-based narratives of a grave’s formation sequence. In terms of the impact that archaeological experience had on evidence recovery rates, archaeological experience was found to have little bearing upon the recovery of evidence from the grave simulation.

It is suggested that forensic archaeologists use the Quadrant Excavation method and Standard Context Recording system to excavate and record clandestine burials. If this approach is unable to be used, the Demirant Excavation method and Standard Context Recording system, or the Stratigraphic Excavation method and Single Context Recording system should be used. Both of these aforementioned techniques proved to be productive in terms of material evidence recovery and the identification and definition of stratigraphic contexts. The Arbitrary Level Excavation method and Unit Level Recording system should not be used, as this method proved to have an extremely poor evidence recovery rate and destroyed the deposition sequence present within the simulated grave.
Archaeological excavations in Moneen Cave, the Burren, Co. Clare Insights into Bronze Age and post-medieval life in the west of Ireland by Marion Dowd. x+98 pages; illustrated throughout with 39 colour plates. 276 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914547. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914554. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In 2011, cavers exploring a little-known cave on Moneen Mountain in County Clare in the west of Ireland discovered part of a human skull, pottery and an antler implement. An archaeological excavation followed, leading to the discovery of large quantities of Bronze Age pottery, butchered animal bones and oyster shells. The material suggests that Moneen Cave was visited intermittently as a sacred place in the Bronze Age landscape. People climbed the mountain, squeezed through the small opening in the cave roof, dropped down into the chamber, and left offerings on a large boulder that dominates the internal space. The excavation also resulted in the recovery of the skeletal remains of an adolescent boy who appears to have died in the cave in the 16th or 17th century. Scientific analyses revealed he had endured periods of malnutrition and ill health, providing insight into the hardships faced by many children in post-medieval Ireland.

About the author:
Dr. Marion Dowd is a Lecturer in Prehistoric Archaeology at the Institute of Technology Sligo, Ireland. For two decades her research has focussed on the human use of caves in Ireland, and specifically the role of caves in prehistoric ritual and religion. She has directed numerous archaeological excavations in Irish caves, and has lectured and published widely on the subject. Her first book, The Archaeology of Caves in Ireland (Oxbow Books, 2015), won the Tratman Award 2015 and the Current Archaeology Book of the Year 2016. This current book is the result of excavations she directed in Moneen Cave, with a team composed of both archaeologists and cavers.
Geometric Period Plithos Burial Ground at Chora of Naxos Island, Greece: Anthropology Report by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. 94 pages; colour graphs throughout. Available both in print and Open Access. Access Archaeology . ISBN 9781784913038. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This report aims to offer glimpses of the human condition on Naxos island, Greece, focusing on the archaeoanthropologic study of the human skeletal remains along with associated contexts of faunal materials recovered from the Geometric (9th -7th c BC) component of the burial ground site of Plithos in Chora at Naxos island.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Estudio antropológico de las estructuras cefálicas en una colección osteológica procedente de Chinchero (Perú) An anthropological study of cephalic structures in an osteological collection from Chinchero (Peru) by José I. Herrera Ureña. viii+62 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English abstract. Available both in print and Open Access. Access Archaeology . ISBN 9781784912710. £24.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This study presents an anthropological study of crania and mandibles from the osteological collection from Chinchero (Peru), currently housed at the American Archaeological and Ethnological Museum of the Complutense University of Madrid. From 1968 to 1971, a team of archaeologists of the Spanish Scientific Mission in Hispanic America excavated the site of Chinchero, a small village located in the Andean high plateau near Cusco. As the result of this mission, remains from 8 single burials and two ossuaries dated to pre-colonial times were exhumed and brought to Spain. The excavated area included an ancient palace and several administrative and religious structures built by Tupac Yupanqui, who ruled the Inca Empire between 1471 and 1493. The surroundings of the catholic church, erected over one of these buildings, were excavated as well.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Structured Deposition of Animal Remains in the Fertile Crescent during the Bronze Age by José Luis Ramos Soldado. vi+58 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. Access Archaeology . ISBN 9781784912727. £20.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Although most of the animal remains recorded throughout the archaeological excavations consist usually of large assemblages of discarded and fragmented bones, it is possible to yield articulated animal skeletons in some cases. Most of them have been usually picked up from sacred and/or funerary contexts, but not all of them might fit necessarily in ritual and symbolic interpretations, and not all of the structured deposit of animal remains may be explained due to anthropic factors. In addition, zooarchaeology has traditionally focused on animal domestication, husbandry and economy, and species identification above all, shutting out further discussion about these type of findings. Moreover, the limited condition of the data is also another issue to bear in mind. Thus, the aim of this paper has been to draw up a literature review of the structured deposits of animal remains during the third and second millennia BC in the Ancient Near East for its subsequent classification and detailed interpretation. In this survey it has been attested that not only most of the articulated animal remains have been found in ritual and/or funerary contexts but also that all species recorded– but some exceptions–are domestic. Hence, I argue in this paper that there is a broad religious attitude towards the main domesticated animals of human economy in the Ancient Near East, based on the closeness of these animals to the human sphere. Therefore, it seems that domesticated animals were powerful constituents in the cultural landscape of these regions, never simply resources.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Cannibalism in the Linear Pottery Culture: The Human Remains from Herxheim by Bruno Boulestin and Anne-Sophie Coupey. viii+143 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 183 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912130. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912147. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Herxheim enclosure, located in the German region of Palatinate, is one of the major discoveries of the last two decades regarding the Linear Pottery Culture, and probably one of the most significant in advancing understanding of how this culture ended. The spectacular deposits, mostly composed of human remains, recovered on the occasion of the two excavation campaigns carried out on the site, grabbed people’s attention and at the same time raised several questions regarding their interpretation, which had so far mostly hesitated between peculiar funerary practices, war and cannibalism.

The authors provide here the first extensive study of the human remains found at Herxheim, focusing mainly on those recovered during the 2005–2010 excavation campaign. They first examine the field data in order to reconstruct at best the modalities of deposition of these remains. Next, from the quantitative analyses and those of the bone modifications, they describe the treatments of the dead, showing that they actually were the victims of cannibalistic practices. The nature of this cannibalism is then discussed on the basis of biological, palaeodemographic and isotopic studies, and concludes that an exocannibalism existed linked to armed violence. Finally, the human remains are placed in both their local and chronocultural contexts, and a general interpretation is proposed of the events that unfolded in Herxheim and of the reasons for the social crisis at the end of the Linear Pottery culture in which they took place.

About the Authors:
Bruno Boulestin is an anthropologist at the University of Bordeaux, France, member of the “Anthropologie des populations passées et presents” (A3P) team of the unit “De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel, Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie” (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). He is working on the diachronic study of practices around death in ancient societies from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data and is specialized in the study of bone modifications and corpse treatments.

Anne-Sophie Coupey is an archaeologist at the University of Rennes 1, France, Centre de Recherche en Archéologie, Archéosciences et Histoire (CReAAH, UMR 6566 of the CNRS). She is specialized in the archaeology of death and has worked mainly on funerary practices in Southeastern Asia.

Prepared for Eternity A study of human embalming techniques in ancient Egypt using computerised tomography scans of mummies by Robert Loynes. xx+249 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 colour plates. 156 2015 Archaeopress Egyptology 9. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911102. £43.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911119. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication brings together personal analyses of sixty CT scans of ancient Egyptian human mummies collected from many museums throughout the UK and continental Europe. The effect is that of performing ‘virtual autopsies’ (‘virtopsies’) allowing techniques of mummification to be examined. The historical age of the mummies ranges from the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period. Several new observations are made regarding the preparation of mummies and confirmation of previously described themes is tempered by the observation of variations probably indicating individual workshop practices. The work presents a springboard for further detailed research on the subject.

'This volume contains the results of his studies of sixty scans of mummies, dating from the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period, collected from various UK and continental European museums. The data obtained is presented in great detail and will undoubtedly prove invaluable in future research into mummification.' - J. Peter Phillips (Ancient Egypt Magazine, 2016)

About the Author:
Robert Loynes is an Orthopaedic Surgeon who, after retirement, carried out the research described in this publication and was subsequently awarded a PhD in Egyptology. His lifelong interest in Egyptology and a lifetime career using medical images fired his passion for the subject of mummy research specifically using CT scans as a tool.
The Early and Late Roman Rural Cemetery at Nemesbőd (Vas County, Hungary) edited by Gábor Ilon and Judit Kvassay. x+194 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 132 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910488. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910495. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman Cemetery at Nemesbőd belonged to a settlement or a villa which was located on the territory of the Roman colony of Savaria (present day Szombathey, Hungary) in Pannonia. The book deals with thirty-seven graves, which consisted of mainly cremation but also of some inhumation burials. Detailed analysis of grave goods (bronze vessels, pottery, glass, personal accessories, lamps etc.) provides a study of burial customs and their evolution. In addition, specialist reports on human remains and animal bone as well as on epigraphic material are presented.

Palaeopathology in Egypt and Nubia A century in review edited by Ryan Metcalfe, Jenefer Cockitt and Rosalie David. viii+169 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 125 2014 Archaeopress Egyptology 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910266. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910273. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The study of human remains from ancient Egypt and Nubia has captured the imagination of many people for generations, giving rise to the discipline of palaeopathology and fostering bioarchaeological research. This book contains 16 papers that cover material presented at a workshop entitled ‘Palaeopathology in Egypt and Nubia: A Century in Review,’ held at the Natural History Museum, London (August 29–30, 2012), which formed part of a three-year research project, ‘Sir Grafton Elliot Smith: Palaeopathology and the Archaeological Survey of Nubia.’ The papers explore the subject of palaeopathology from its beginnings in the early 1900s through to current research themes and the impact of technological development in the field. Revealing the diverse range of methods used to study human remains in these regions, the book gives readers an insight into the fascinating work carried out over the last century, and suggests some possible future directions for the field.

'This is a volume of sixteen papers (presented at the 2012 Natural History Museum workshop) which explore the subject of palaeopathology (the study of human remains) from its beginnings in the early 1900s through to the latest technological developments... Complete with black-and-white illustrations and bibliographies, this is an essential guide to one of the most important areas of Egyptological research today.' – Sarah Griffiths (Ancient Egypt Magazine, August 2015)
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