​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Gordon House, 276 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7ED, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress Site Hut

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
POTINGAIR
PRESS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
Geology for Archaeologists A short introduction by J.R.L. Allen. viii+140 pages; illustrated in colour and black & white (28 colour plates). 363 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916879. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916886. £11.99 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This short introduction aims to provide archaeologists of all backgrounds with a grounding in the principles, materials, and methods of geology. Sections include coverage of main rock-forming minerals and classes of rocks. Geological maps and structures are introduced, and the elements of geological stratigraphy and dating are explained and related to archaeological experience. Fluvial and coastal environments are important archaeological landscapes and their formation processes, sediments and topography are outlined. Stone for building, implement-making, tool-making, and making mortar are all discussed, followed by an introduction to clays and ceramics. A final chapter introduces metallurgical landscapes: metalliferous ores, mining and smelting, and metal-making industries. Each chapter ends with a short reading list, and many have selected case-histories in illustration of the points made. Included is a glossary of technical terms.

About the author
Emeritus Professor John Allen is currently a Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Reading. He took a degree in Geology at the University of Sheffield and for many years taught Geology at Reading, where his chief interests were in the sedimentology of fluvial deposits (especially the Devonian Old Red Sandstone) and in sedimentary processes and structures. In the 1980s he turned his attention to modern estuarine sediments, and became increasingly interested in the archaeology of British coastal environments, especially those of the Severn and other estuaries, where he showed in collaboration with professional archaeologists that an appreciation of geological processes is essential to an understanding of the archaeological sites and their landscapes. His contributions to postgraduate courses in Geoarchaeology at Reading stress the importance of an understanding of geological principles, maps, and materials, especially rocks and minerals, to the refinement and resolution of numerous archaeological problems.
Palaeolithic Pioneers: Behaviour, abilities, and activity of early Homo in European landscapes around the western Mediterranean basin ~1.3-0.05 Ma. by Michael J. Walker. 342 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916206. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916213. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaic humans were present for over a million years in western Mediterranean Europe where they left very many traces of their early stone-age activities and behaviour, and sometimes even human skeletal remains. This book evaluates archaeological findings about their life-ways at many important sites in Italy, southern France, and Spain, from the earliest ones 1,300,000 years ago, to those of Neanderthals fifty-thousand years ago, just before they were superseded by skeletally-“modern” humans. The cognitive and manual skills of archaic humans in western Mediterranean Europe are considered in the Pleistocene contexts of major climatic fluctuations and changing environmental circumstances. The book focusses on their remarkable capacity to adapt, frequently reinvent themselves, and persist for long periods of time, even though finally they did not endure. Their achievements and abilities withstand comparison to those of ancient humans in Africa or Asia during Early, Middle, and early Late Pleistocene times.

About the Author Michael Walker (Colchester, 1941) is Honorific Emeritus Professor in the Department of Zoology and Physical Anthropology at the University of Murcia in Spain, and directs field-work at Cueva Negra del Estrecho del Río Quípar (Caravaca, Murcia) and Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo (Torre Pacheco, Murcia). He studied at University College, Oxford, graduated in Animal Physiology and Medicine, took the Postgraduate Diploma in Prehistoric Archaeology and gained his D.Phil. for research in S.E. Spanish prehistory and palaeoanthropology. Following a junior research fellowship at The Queen’s College, Oxford, he lectured at the universities of Edinburgh and Sydney before being appointed in 1988 to establish Physical Anthropology at the University of Murcia. Paleoanthropologist Erik Trinkaus (Washington University of St. Louis) and Michael Walker have edited The People of Palomas, Neandertals from the Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, Southeastern Spain (Texas A&M University Press, 2017).
Atlas of Mammal Distribution through Africa from the LGM (~18 ka) to Modern Times The zooarchaeological record by Hélène Jousse. 316 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 309 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915407. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915414. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This work provides the first overview of mammal species distributions in Africa since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18 ky) to modern time. It is derived from data published mainly in the zooarchaeological literature until 2009. During a post-doctoral project hosted in the zoological department of mammal collection at the Naturhistoriches Museum in Vienna (Austria), the occurrences of taxa in archaeological sites on the African continent were recorded in a database, integrating geographical and chronological information. This record offers the opportunity to produce a chronological atlas of mammalian distributions by presenting their occurrences on successive maps over the last 18 ky.

This work is useful for zooarchaeologists dealing with one particular species by providing a bibliographical work that documents its past locations. It must be noted that fauna are mainly documented through their presence at archaeological sites and are therefore tied to the presence of humans and their activities. This may only partially reproduce their true past distribution. However, the sites offer a good coverage throughout space and time and generally reflect the extent of mammalian distributions, although the limits of their distributions may be further refined. The atlas will aid in the investigation of palaeoecological issues, such as the capacity of mammals to adapt to climatic change and respond to human disturbance in the recent past of Africa.

The database also provides information that is fundamental to a better understanding of what influenced the present-day distribution, dynamism and structure of mammalian communities in Africa. By incorporating a larger temporal scale to modern ecological studies, it may help control their conservation since desiccation and human disturbance in Africa is still a worrying question for their future.
Archaeology of the Ouse Valley, Sussex, to AD 1500 edited by Dudley Moore, Michael J. Allen, and David Rudling. xxii+138 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 1 colour plate. 251 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913779. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913786. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Ouse valley, East Sussex, is a key communication route from the Channel coast, via the Downs (and the historic county town of Lewes), to the wide expanse of the Weald. It traverses and encompasses landscapes and archaeological sites of both regional and national importance – all connected by the river Ouse and its valley. This is the first review of the archaeology of this important landscape – from Palaeolithic to medieval times by contributors all routed in the archaeology of Sussex. Binding together the archaeology is a review of the geoarchaeology and palaeo-environment following which the chapters document the collective archaeology and potential from the Palaeolithic of Boxgrove vs Piltdown, via Mesolithic archaeology from the textbook excavations of Grahame Clark to recent 21st century investigations. Monuments of causewayed enclosures, long barrows and round barrows represent some of the Neolithic and Bronze Age evidence with some extraordinary finds recorded in the Bronze Age. From hillforts and villas, to medieval rural and urban excavation; the Ouse valley represents a microcosm of the wider region, the contributions collectively reveal the importance and significance of this valley to the development of landscape history and society of a quintessential English county. The narrative concludes with the first detailed research agenda for the Ouse valley.
Holocene Prehistory in the Télidjène Basin, Eastern Algeria Capsian occupations at Kef Zoura D and Aïn Misteheyia edited by David Lubell. vi+226 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 4 colour plates. Papers in English and French. 239 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913731. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913748. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From 1972 to 1979, field work was conducted in the Télidjène Basin, Eastern Algeria, as part of a project called The Prehistoric Cultural Ecology of Capsian Escargotières. The primary objective was the controlled excavation of two stratified Capsian sites, the open-air escargotière Aïn Misteheyia (1973 and 1976) and the rock shelter Kef Zoura D (1976 and 1978), both of which have remained incompletely published until now. Aïn Misteheyia and Kef Zoura D have proven to be key sites in a discussion that has been ongoing since at least the 1930s when Vaufrey published his interpretation of Capsian stratigraphy, trying to understand if there was a temporal succession between the Capsien typique and the Capsien supérieur. These are the only Capsian escargotières excavated with modern methods and extensive radiocarbon dating that have a clear stratigraphic sequence in which both variants of the Capsian are represented. We show that Capsien typique precedes Capsien supérieur, that the latter saw the introduction of a new technique for the production of blanks (pressure flaking), that the change is more-or-less contemporary with the 8200 cal BP cold event, and that it was accompanied by a subtle change in a subsistence regime of continued foraging despite the introduction of some herding of apparently introduced domestic stock in neighbouring regions that suggests the changes observed at these two sites may have eventually led in some areas to the introduction of Neolithic subsistence patterns, although there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the central Capsian area of eastern Algeria and southern Tunisia. Aïn Misteheyia was described in two previous reports in Libyca, but the artifact illustrations were never published and appear here as an addendum. Four chapters describe the chronology, stratigraphy, lithic, faunal and charcoal assemblages from Kef Zoura D. In addition, there are chapters analyzing the well preserved assemblages of worked bone from the Capsien supérieur deposits at both sites as well as the small assemblages of marine shell. One chapter is a reprinted paper that originally appeared in Sahara on an engraved stone plaque from Kef Zoura D, and a final chapter is the first report on an ongoing study of use-wear in the lithic assemblage from Kef Zoura D.

About the Editor:
David Lubell (Professor Emeritus, University of Alberta and Adjunct Professor, University of Waterloo) received his PhD in 1971 from Columbia University. He has directed archaeological field work in Algeria, Portugal and Italy, always with an emphasis on the inter-relationship of human groups with their environments as reflected in their subsistence patterns and the analysis of the artifacts they made and used. In collaboration with Mary Jackes, he has expanded his horizons to take into account the bioarchaeology and palaeodemography of the human populations involved. He has also made a decades-long study of the occurrence of edible land snails in Holocene archaeological sites throughout the Mediterranean region and is convinced (but unable yet to prove) that their presence in abundance represents a part of the transition from foraging to food production.

Reviews:

'This volume is a detailed and convincing interdisciplinary presentation of important archaeological material, illustrated with numerous very informative, high-quality figures.' -Jörg Linstädter (Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa, 2017)

'The major achievement of this book is the systematic description of well stratified Capsian sites, offering a high-resolution representation of the transformation of this horizon from the beginning, during the Early Holocene, until its evolved phase... The book is undoubtedly an important entry point for the research in Kef Zoura and at the same time a significant contribution to the knowledge of the Holocene of Algeria.' -Giuseppina Mut
Romans, Rubbish, and Refuse The archaeobotanical assemblage of Regione VI, insula I, Pompeii by Charlene Alexandria Murphy. xii+137 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 1 colour plate. 152 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 8. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911157. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911164. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Although world-renowned, Pompeii, the first Roman site to be excavated and one of the most visited and best-studied archaeological sites in the world, still has unanswered questions to yield, especially in terms of its long-term development from pre-Roman times. The extensive excavations (1995–2006) by the Anglo-American Project in Pompeii (AAPP) has provided a rare insight into chronological change within the city of Pompeii. This research was significant as an insula block within the city of Pompeii had never previously been excavated in its entirety. The analysis of all the recovered seeds, fruits and cereal remains has provided a unique research opportunity to undertake a diachronic study of urban Roman plant food consumption and discards. Over the past two centuries of excavations at Pompeii only a handful of published works dealing with botanical evidence have been published. The results from this study demonstrate a standard Mediterranean archaeobotanical assemblage recovered from Insula VI.1 which included wheat, barley, legumes, olives, grapes and figs. A wider diversity of fruits, pulses, and additional cereals, especially broomcorn millet were also found. These results support the established view that Pompeii was a fully urbanised city in the 1st century B.C.
end of results