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Lusitanian Amphorae: Production and Distribution edited by Inês Vaz Pinto, Rui Roberto de Almeida and Archer Martin. viii+464 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout with 7 colour plates. 270 2016 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914271. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914288. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

More than a century of archaeological investigation in Portugal has helped to discover, excavate and study many Lusitanian amphorae kiln sites, with their amphorae being widely distributed in Lusitania. These containers were identified in Ostia and Rome from the 1970s and thereafter in many sites around the Mediterranean, but their numbers have always seemed scarce. Were they not being recognized and therefore underestimated? Were they all fish-product amphorae? Did they ever reach a significant market share in the other provinces of Hispania? And what was their contribution to the supply of the city of Rome or to other cities in the centre of the Empire?

This collective volume is a contribution to the discussion of these and other questions, and to a better understanding of the production and distribution of Lusitanian amphorae.
La Céramique du groupe épiscopal d’ARADI/Sidi Jdidi (Tunisie) by Tomoo Mukai with a contribution by C. Capelli. x+434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text with English abstract. 260 2016 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 9. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912611. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912628. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study focuses on ceramic finds from the excavations (1996-2006) of the Episcopal Group of Sidi Jdidi, the ancient city of Aradi, in the hinterland of Hammamet in Tunisia, directed by Dr Aïcha Ben Abed-Ben Khader and Prof. Michel Fixot. The aim of these excavations was to understand the processes of the (evolution and) insertion of Christian monuments into the pre-existent town and the distribution of the liturgical and economic functions within various buildings of this ecclesiastic centre. The ceramological study contributed to attaining this aim by suggesting dates for each phase of the construction, occupation and abandonment of the Episcopal group, as well as evidence for the function of each space. Furthermore, this study has documented the (strong) rural and regional characteristics of the ceramic assemblages: these are very different from those of the large-scale excavations at Carthage and indicate a pattern of self-sufficient consumption supplied by purely intra-regional trade. The author is a Research Fellow of The National Museum of Western Art (Tokyo, Japan), and Research Associate of the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, MCC, CCJ, F-13000, Aix-en-Provence, France).
La production de la céramique antique dans la région de Salakta et Ksour Essef (Tunisie) by Jihen Nacef. viii+256 pages; illustrated throughout. French text with English abstract. 180 2015 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 8. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911720. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911737. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication provides the most updated information on the ceramic production (amphorae, cooking and coarse wares, ceramic building materials) of Salakta and the Ksour Essef district, in the Sahel region of Tunisia, from the 3rd century BC to the 7th century AD. This book deals with the history and the archaeology of Sullecthum/Salakta, the typology of the ceramic production (mainly amphorae), the chronology and the location of the workshops, the amphora stamps and contents, the distribution in the Mediterranean, and the organisation of production and trade. The author is Lecturer at the Institut Supérieur des Etudes Appliquées en Humanités de Mahdia (University of Monastir, Tunisia).
Contextos cerámicos y transformaciones urbanas en Carthago Nova (s. II-III d.C.) by Alejandro Quevedo. x+397 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English summary. 179 2015 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910549. £72.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910556. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The transition process of the Roman city between the Early Roman period and Late Antiquity is difficult to understand due to the absence of urban models and the decline in epigraphy. The transformations that accompany this period are detectable in the western provinces of the Empire from a very early time. Their interpretation –crisis, mutation, etc.– varies with each study case. Ancient Cartagena (Hispania Citerior) is a paradigm of these changes. Starting under Marcus Aurelius, the city began to show symptoms of exhaustion, at the same time as literary and epigraphic evidence began to decline, until it disappeared altogether. In these pages we aim to contribute –and at the same time vindicate– an approach to discovering more about the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD based on the archaeological record and taking into account the stratigraphic sequences and especially the pottery material culture. The compiled documentation begins with a triple vocation: to serve as an instrument for dating; to provide quantified data about Carthago Nova’s patterns of consumption, way of life and trading links; and to understand the evolution of the city in a period from which the urban model of the Late Period emerged.
Once upon a Time in the East The Chronological and Geographical Distribution of Terra Sigillata and Red Slip Ware in the Roman East by Philip Bes. viii+196 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 158 2015 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911201. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911218. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this book Philip Bes summarises the results of his PhD thesis (Catholic University of Leuven) on the analysis of production trends and complex, quantified distribution patterns of the principal traded sigillatas and slipped table wares in the Roman East, from the early Empire to Late Antiquity (e.g. Italian Sigillata, Eastern Sigillata A, B and C, Çandarli ware, Phocean Red Slip Ware/LRC, Cypriot Red Slip Ware/LRD and African Red Slip Wares). He draws on his own work in Sagalassos and Boeotia, as well as an exhaustive review of archaeological publications of ceramic data. The analysis compares major regional blocks, documenting coastal as well as inland sites, and offers an interpretation of these complex data in terms of the economy and possible distribution mechanisms.
El comercio tardoantiguo (ss.IV-VII) en el Noroeste peninsular a través del registro cerámico de la ría de Vigo by Adolfo Fernández. xii+529 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white with some colour pages. In Spanish. 93 2014 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739721. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910709. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This work investigates a large assemblage of potentially late-dated Roman ceramics excavated in the early 1990s during rescue interventions in Vigo (N/E Spain) and its surroundings. It is well established that much of this material originated from the Mediterranean, especially the eastern provinces of the Empire. Based on the analyses of these investigations, this study goes on to assess the extent of the Atlantic distribution route and link the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula well within the trading dynamics of the Mediterranean world.
Ánforas vinarias de Hispania Citerior-Tarraconensis (s. I a.C.– I d.C.) Caracterización arqueométrica by Verònica Martínez Ferreras. xvi+319 pages; illustrated throughout in colour & black and white. Spanish text with English summary. 89 2014 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739691. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910693. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the results of a multidisciplinary archaeological and archaeometric study of the wine amphorae produced in Hispania Citerior (Tarraconensis, in Augustus’ reorganisation) between the first century BC and the first century AD. Wine production expanded in this area at the beginning of the first century BC, as new Roman towns were founded and new farms or villae gradually emerged in rural areas. However, it was during Augustus’ reign that wine production and trade reached their peak.

The study aims to shed new light on the composition of the wine amphorae produced in this area as well as on the technological processes involved in their manufacture along within the period considered. For that, the study includes the characterisation of several amphora types produced in various ceramic workshops located along the Catalan coast which initiated pottery activity at different times. All the available archaeological information for each case study is reviewed, considering data referring to the production centres and also to the geology and the environment in which the pottery workshops were located.
Roman Pottery in the Near East. Local Production and Regional Trade Proceedings of the round table held in Berlin, 19-20 February 2010 edited by Bettina Fischer-Genz, Yvonne Gerber and Hanna Hamel. ii+215 pages; illustrated throughout. 88 2014 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739677. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910686. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Discussions and scientific exchange are crucial for the advancement of a young discipline such as the study of Roman pottery in the Near East. Therefore, in addition to large conferences such as the ‘Late Roman Coarse Ware Conference’ (LRCW) where the Near East plays only a marginal role, an international workshop with 20 participants dedicated solely to the study of Roman common ware pottery in the Near East was held in Berlin on 18th and 19th February 2010. The goal of this workshop was to provide researchers actively engaged in the study of Roman common wares the possibility to meet and discuss the current state of research as well as questions and problems they are facing with their material. Some of the participants were able to bring pottery samples, which provided the possibility to compare and discuss the identification and denomination of specific fabrics on a regional and supra-regional scale. This volume presents 17 papers from this stimulating event.

The Archaeopress series, Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery (RLAMP) is devoted to research of the Roman and late Antique pottery in the Mediterranean. It is designed to serve as a reference point for all potential authors devoted to pottery studies on a pan-Mediterranean basis. The series seeks to gather innovative individual or collective research on the many dimensions of pottery studies ranging from pure typological and chronological essays, to diachronic approaches to particular classes, the complete publication of ceramic deposits, pottery deposit sequences, archaeometry of ancient ceramics, methodological proposals, studies of the economy based on pottery evidence or, among others, ethnoarchaeological ceramic research that may help to understand the production, distribution and consumption of pottery in the Mediterranean basin.

Other titles in the series: LRFW 1. Late Roman Fine Wares. Solving problems of typology and chronology. A review of the evidence, debate and new contexts edited by Miguel Ángel Cau, Paul Reynolds and Michel Bonifay. ISBN 9781905739462. Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 1 (2012), £30.00; The Ancient Mediterranean Trade in Ceramic Building Materials: A Case Study in Carthage and Beirut by Philip Mills. ISBN 9781905739608. £30.00. Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 2 (2013), £30.00.
The Ancient Mediterranean Trade in Ceramic Building Materials: A Case Study in Carthage and Beirut by Philip Mills. Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 2. x+132 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black and white. With CD. 81 2013 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 2. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739608. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910679. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study (the second volume in the Archaeopress series devoted to the publication of ceramics in the Roman Mediterranean and outlying territories from the late Republic to late Antiquity) addresses the level of interregional trade of ceramic building material (CBM), traditionally seen as a high bulk low value commodity, within the ancient Mediterranean between the third century BC and the seventh century AD. It examines the impact of different modes of production, distribution and consumption of CBM and how archaeological assemblages differ from what is predicted by current models of the ancient economy. It also explores how CBM can be used to investigate cultural identity and urban form. CBM has great potential in investigating these topics. It survives in large quantities in the archaeological record; it is transported as a commodity in its own right, not as a container for other products like amphorae. The amount of CBM used in a building can be estimated, and this can be extrapolated to urban centres to model consumption in ways that are not possible for other goods. This allows the potential derivation of economic information to a higher level of precision than is the case for other materials. The material used in this study derives from stratified assemblages from two major ports of the ancient Mediterranean: Carthage and Beirut. CBM as a material is comparable to pottery, only it does not exhibit the same range of forms. This leaves fabric as a major means of analysing CBM samples. For this reason a programme of petrological thin sectioning has been carried out on these assemblages. These data have been combined with the taphonomic and dating evidence from the excavations. The results showed that the levels of imports of CBM into these two cities were much higher than would normally be expected from the orthodox model of the consumer city. They also suggest that CBM can be used as a tool to investigate cultural identity.

This study is the second volume in the Archaeopress series devoted to the publication of ceramics in the Roman Mediterranean and outlying territories from the late Republic to late Antiquity. See below for LRFW 1. Late Roman Fine Wares. Solving problems of typology and chronology. A review of the evidence, debate and new contexts (2012) edited by Miguel Ángel Cau, Paul Reynolds and Michel Bonifay. ISBN 9781905739462.
LRFW 1. Late Roman Fine Wares. Solving problems of typology and chronology. A review of the evidence, debate and new contexts edited by Miguel Ángel Cau, Paul Reynolds and Michel Bonifay. Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 1. 2012. xii+251 pages; illustrated throughout. Contributions in English, French and Spanish. 63 2012 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739462. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910662. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Buy Now

"ROMAN AND LATE ANTIQUE MEDITERRANEAN POTTERY". In November 2008, an ICREA/ESF Exploratory Workshop on the subject of late Roman fine wares was held in Barcelona, the main aim being the clarification of problems regarding the typology and chronology of the three principal table wares found in Mediterranean contexts (African Red Slip Ware, Late Roman C and Late Roman D). The discussion highlighted the need to undertake a similar approach for other ceramic classes across the Mediterranean provinces. In addition, it was perceived that ceramic studies are often dispersed and in such a variety of publications that it is difficult to follow progress in this vast field. Therefore, a series devoted to Roman and late Antique pottery in the Mediterranean was proposed to serve as a reference point for all potential authors devoted to pottery studies on a pan-Mediterranean basis. The creation of such a series would not only serve as a means of publishing the results of the ICREA/ESF workshop but also as a network for publication of in-depth monographs devoted to archaeological ceramics of the Mediterranean in the Roman and late Antique periods.

With this first volume on ceramic assemblages and the dating of late Roman fine wares, Archaeopress launch this new series devoted to the publication of ceramics in the Roman Mediterranean and outlying territories from the late Republic to late Antiquity.

Contents: Introductions (a) (M.A. Cau, P. Reynolds, M. Bonifay); (b): LRFW Working Group (text by M.A. Cau, P. Reynolds and M. Bonifay), An initiative for the revision of late Roman fine wares in the Mediterranean (c. AD 200-700): The Barcelona ICREA/ESF Workshop; (c) LRFW Working Group (text by P. Reynolds, M. Bonifay and M.A. Cau), Key contexts for the dating of late Roman Mediterranean fine wares: a preliminary review and ‘seriation’; 1) Ceramica e contesti nel Quartiere Bizantino del Pythion di Gortina (Creta): alla ricerca della “complessità” nella datazione (E. Zanini and S. Costa); 2) Coins, pottery and the dating of assemblages (R. Reece); 3) Late Roman D. A matter of open(ing) or closed horizons? (J. Poblome and N. Firat); 4) A note on the development of Cypriot Late Roman D forms 2 and 9 (P. Reynolds); 5) Chronologie finale de la sigillée africaine A à partir des contextes de Chãos Salgados (Mirobriga?): différences de facies entre Orient et Occident (J.C. Quaresma); 6) Sigillatas africanas y orientales de mediados del VI d. C. procedentes de los rellenos de colmatación de una cisterna de Hispalis (Sevilla). Los contextos de la Plaza de la Pescadería (J. Vázquez Paz and E. García Vargas); 7) A 7th century pottery deposit from Byzantine Carthago Spartaria (Cartagena, Spain) (P. Reynolds); 8) Contextos cerámicos del siglo VI d.C. de Iluro (Hispania Tarraconensis) (V. Revilla Calvo); 9) Note sur les sigillées orientales tardives du port de Fos (Bouches-du-Rhône, France) (F. Marty); 10) L’agglomération de Constantine (Lançon-de-Provence, Bouches-du-Rhône): deux contextes du VIe siècle (G. Duperron and F. Verdin); 11) Un dépôt de céramiques du début du Ve s. apr. J.-C. sur le site de la rue de la Douane à Porquerolles (Hyères, Var) (E. Pellegrino); 12) Un ensemble de céramiques de l’extrême fin du IVe s. apr. J.-C. sur le site du n°43 de l’avenue du XVe Corps à Fréjus (Var) (E. Pellegrino); 13) Campiani: un ensemble du IIe siècle à Lucciana (Haute-Corse) (S. Lang-Desvignes); 14) Fine wares from Beirut contexts, c. 450 to the early 7th century (P. Reynolds); 15) Le mobilier céramique de la citerne C4 de la Maison de la Rotonde à Carthage (A. Bourgeois).
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