​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Gordon House, 276 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7ED, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress Site Hut

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

Archaeopress Archaeology
Seminar for Arabian Studies
JGA
Journal of Greek Archaeology
JHP
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery
Praehistorica Mediterranea
3rdGuides
Potingair Press
Digital Editions
Archaeopress
Open Access
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
Archaeological rescue excavations on Packages 3 and 4 of the Batinah Expressway, Sultanate of Oman by Ben Saunders. viii+212 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 248 2016 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913953. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913960. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The archaeological excavations along the route of packages 3 and 4 of the Batinah Expressway, Sultanate of Oman, conducted during the spring and summer of 2014, recorded over 60 archaeological sites over the 200km stretch of roadway cutting through the Batinah plain, north-west of Muscat. The majority of these sites were prehistoric tombs of varying ages. These excavations have allowed a re-thinking of the dating of some of these tombs, looking particularly at the structural styles of the tombs as well as their location in the landscape. It has also demonstrated techniques of rapid yet reliable excavation and recording techniques adapted from UK commercial archaeology for the Omani conditions. The report builds on the work of academic studies and adds a large dataset to the archaeology of the Batinah, Oman and the wider region. It is hoped that this will allow a wider scale reconsideration of the burial styles of the prehistoric Gulf.

About the Author:
Ben Saunders has been working in archaeology in the UK and Middle East for the past 7 years as an excavator and ceramics expert, following on from his research masters in Indian Ocean trade at Durham University. The team behind the BEH 3-4 excavations are all highly experienced archaeologists combining expertise within the Middle East with modern commercial archaeological practice and techniques. This report is a testament to their hard work in very challenging temperatures and their commitment to Omani archaeology.
Sharma Un entrepôt de commerce medieval sur la côte du Ḥaḍramawt (Yémen, ca 980-1180) edited by Axelle Rougeulle. xxii + 559 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text throughout. 173 2015 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 17. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911942. £88.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911959. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Cited by al-Muqaddasī in c.985 and then by al-Idrīsī in c.1150, the medieval port of Sharma was discovered in 1996 at the extremity of the Ra's Sharma, 50km east of al-Shiḥr on the Ḥaḍramawt coast of Yemen; it was excavated in 2001-2005. This unique site was actually a transit entrepôt, a cluster of warehouses probably founded by Iranian merchants and entirely devoted to the maritime trade. It knew a rather short period of activity, between around 980 and the second half of the 12th century, which may be acknowledged as the Sharma horizon. Excavations proved that this settlement experienced six occupation phases, which are closely related to the political and economic developments in the region at that time. The material is mainly transit merchandises, small objects, resins, glass and pottery; some of the ceramics were locally made, in the nearby kilns of Yaḍghaṭ, but most (70%) were imported, from all parts of the Indian Ocean from China to East Africa. The typo-chronological study of this closed assemblage brings very precise information on the dating and evolution of the various types recorded, and the historical analyse sheds new light on the history of the Islamic maritime trade in the 10th to 12th centuries.

French description:
Mentionné par al-Muqaddasī vers 985 puis par al-Idrīsī vers 1150, le port médiéval de Sharma a été découvert en 1996 à l’extrémité du Ra’s Sharma, à 50 km à l’est de la ville d’al-Shiḥr sur la côte du Ḥaḍramawt au Yémen ; il a fait l’objet de quatre campagnes de fouilles en 2001-2005. Ce site unique était en fait un entrepôt de transit, probablement fondé par des marchands iraniens et entièrement consacré au commerce maritime. Il connut un brève période d’activité entre ca 980 et la seconde moitié du XIIe siècle, que l’on peut appeler l’horizon Sharma. Les fouilles ont montré que l’entrepôt avait connu 6 phases chronologiques, qui reflètent étroitement l’évolution politico-économique de la région à cette époque. Le matériel mis au jour représente essentiellement les vestiges de marchandises en transit, petits objets, résines aromatiques, verreries et céramiques ; un tiers du corpus céramique est d’origine locale, produit dans les fours proches de Yaḍghaṭ, le reste est importé, de toutes les régions riveraines de l’océan Indien depuis la Chine jusqu’à l’Afrique orientale. L’étude chrono-typologique de cet ensemble clos apporte des informations précises sur la datation et l’évolution des divers types répertoriés, et l’analyse historique éclaire d’un jour nouveau l’histoire du commerce maritime musulman aux Xe-XIIe siècles.
end of results