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FORTHCOMING: Die Ausrüstung der römischen Armee auf der Siegessäule des Marcus Aurelius in Rom Ein Vergleich zwischen der skulpturalen Darstellung und den archäologischen Bodenfunden by Boris Alexander Nikolaus Burandt. iv+412 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. German text. 369 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 28. ISBN 9781784916930. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The reliefs of the column of Marcus Aurelius in Rome are used extensively for the illustration of Roman soldiers. However, despite the fact that in the last decades a number of sites at the Danube Limes have been analyzed, where numerous militaria from the Markomannic Wars have emerged, there is no comparison between this work of official Roman art and the archaeological finds. This book aims to address this lacuna. Each piece of equipment of the Roman soldier is analyzed in its sculptural representation and compared with the existing finds as well as supplementary comparisons with secondary sources. The result is a broad picture of the Roman army under Marcus Aurelius and of Rome's depiction of their forces in state propaganda. In addition, the present work comprehensively separates the antique parts of the frieze from the additions made during the late Renaissance for the first time and thus provides a solid basis for future archaeological and art historical evaluations.

About the Author
Boris A. N. Burandt studied Archeology of the Roman Provinces, Classical Archeology, History of Art and Ancient History at the University of Cologne, and specialized early in Roman military equipment. After completing his studies he was research assistant at the Morphomata International Center for Advanced Studies and in three projects of the German Archaeological Institute as well as a trainee of the State Office for National Heritage Conservation in the Rhineland. He also participated in various excavations and campaigns in Germany, Italy and North Africa. Since 2017 he has undertaken research at the Goethe-University in Frankfurt on the Main about Roman memorabilia in the context of gladiator fights and chariot races. This book is based on his PhD thesis, which was written between 2012 and 2015 at the University of Cologne.

German Description:
Die Reliefs der Marcussäule in Rom bilden seit Langem vielfach verwendete Vorlagen zur Illustration römischer Soldaten. Doch obwohl in den letzten Dekaden mehrere Fundplätze am Donaulimes aufgearbeitet wurden, an denen zahlreiche Militaria aus den Markomannenkriegen zutage gekommen sind, fehlt bislang ein Vergleich zwischen den Arbeiten der offiziellen römischen Staatskunst und den archäologischen Bodenfunden. Diesen Mangel soll nun das vorliegende Werk beheben. Jeder Ausrüstungsgegenstand des römischen Soldaten wird in seiner skulpturalen Darstellung analysiert und mit den vorliegenden Funden sowie ergänzenden Sekundärquellen verglichen. Es entsteht somit ein umfangreiches Bild der römischen Armee unter Marcus Aurelius und von Roms Umgang mit dem Militär in der staatlichen Propaganda. Außerdem separiert das vorliegende Werk erstmals umfassend die antiken Partien des Friesbandes von den Ergänzungen der Spätrenaissance und legt somit eine solide Basis für künftige archäologische und kunsthistorische Auswertungen.

Boris A. N. Burandt studierte Archäologie der römischen Provinzen, Klassische Archäologie, Kunstgeschichte und Alte Geschichte an der Universität zu Köln und spezialisierte sich früh auf die Erforschung römischer Militärausrüstung. Nach seinem Studium war B. Burandt Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Internationalen Kolleg Morphomata und in drei Projekten des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts sowie Volontär des Rheinischen Amtes für Bodendenkmalpflege. Außerdem nahm er an diversen Ausgrabungen und Kampagnen in Deutschland, Italien und Nordafrika teil. Seit 2017 forscht B. Burandt an der Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt am Main zu römischen Memorabilien im Kontext von Gladiatorenkämpfen und Wagenrennen. Das vorliegende Buch basiert auf seiner Dissertation, die zwischen 2012 und 2015 an der Universität zu Köln entstanden ist.
Glassware and Glassworking in Thessaloniki 1st Century BC – 6th Century AD by Anastassios Ch. Antonaras. viii+384 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 colour plates). 360 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 27. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916794. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916800. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Glassware and Glassworking in Thessaloniki: 1st Century BC – 6th Century AD is a detailed examination of the production of glass and glass vessels in the eastern Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Age to the Early Christian period, analysing production techniques and decoration. The volume establishes the socio-economic framework of glassmaking and glassmakers’ social status in the Roman world generally and in Thessaloniki specifically, while identifying probable local products. Presented are all the excavation glass finds from Thessaloniki and its environs found between 1912 and 2002. A typological classification was created for almost 800 objects – which encompass the overwhelming majority of common excavation finds in the Balkans – as well as for the decorative themes that appear on the more valuable pieces. Comparative material from the entire Mediterranean was studied, verified in its entirety through primary publications. A summary of the excavation history of these vessels’ find-spots is provided, with details for each excavation, in many cases unpublished and identified through research in the archives of the relevant museums and Ephorates of Antiquities. The uses of glass vessels are presented, and there is discussion and interpretation of the reasons that permitted, or imposed, the choice of glass for their production. The finds are statistically analysed, and a chronological overview examining them century by century on the basis of use and place of production is given. Finally, there is an effort to interpret the data from the study in historical terms, and to incorporate the results into the political-economic evolution of the region’s political history. Relatively unfamiliar glassmaking terms are explained in a glossary of glassworking technology and typology terms. The material is fully documented in drawings and photographs, and every object in the catalogue is illustrated. A detailed index of the 602 geographical terms in the work, many unknown, concludes the book.

About the Author:
Anastassios C. Antonaras, a specialist in the history of glass, jewellery and textiles, is an archaeologist and curator at the Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki. His books include: Glassworking, Ancient and Medieval: Terminology, Technology and Typology; A Greek- English-English-Greek Dictionary; Roman and Early Christian Glassworking: Vessels from Thessaloniki and its Region (which received a prize from the Academy of Athens in 2010); Fire and Sand: Ancient Glass in the Princeton University Art Museum; and Artisanal Production in Ancient and Byzantine Thessaloniki: Archaeological, Literary and Epigraphic Evidence. Antonaras has organized numerous exhibitions and symposia, and has published numerous articles on objects from Thessaloniki. He currently serves on the board of the Christian Archaeological Association and is the secretary general of the International Association for the History of Glass.

L’artisanat dans les cites antiques de l’Algérie (Ier siècle avant notre ère –VIIe siècle après notre ère) by Touatia Amraoui. xx+426 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with one plate in colour. French text with English summary. 357 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 26. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916671. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916688. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Normally dealt with in a rather limited way, through the examination of a particular activity or geographical zone, the artisans of ancient North Africa are here, for the first time, the subject of an entire book. Focusing on urban production in Algeria during Antiquity, this critical study brings together new documentation drawn up on the basis of field data and the consultation of archives from a long history of survey in Algeria and France. This synthesis reviews the archaeological sites with workshops by defining their activities, at the same time as analyzing how they operated and looking at them typologically. Based on a comparison with documented workshops in the Western Roman world, the study of the techniques highlights the very strong similarities between the Roman regions but also the specific local variations of the methods used in Africa at this time. Maghreb ethnography shows the permanence of certain practices over time while attempting to reconstruct the "chaîne opératoire". Although it is still difficult to obtain an overall picture both from a spatial and a chronological point of view of the artisanal topography, the data reveals the existence of varied artisanal and commercial activities in urban areas throughout Antiquity.

French description: Abordé généralement de façon ponctuelle à travers une activité particulière ou une zone géographique donnée, l’artisanat en Afrique du nord antique fait ici pour la première fois l’objet d’un ouvrage. Centrée sur la production urbaine en Algérie durant l’Antiquité, cette étude critique rassemble une nouvelle documentation élaborée à partir des données de terrain et de la consultation des archives à partir d’un long travail d’enquête en Algérie et en France. La synthèse fait le point sur les sites archéologiques présentant des ateliers en définissant leur activité tout en analysant leur fonctionnement et leur typologie. En s’appuyant sur une comparaison avec les découvertes d’ateliers dans le monde romain occidental, l’étude des techniques met en évidence les similitudes très fortes entre les régions romaines mais aussi les spécificités locales des méthodes employées en Afrique durant cette période. L’ethnographie maghrébine montre quant à elle la permanence de certaines pratiques à travers le temps tout en complétant l’essai de restitution de la « chaîne opératoire ». S’il est encore difficile d’avoir une vision d’ensemble tant d’un point de vue spatial que chronologique de la topographie artisanale, les données recensées révèlent l’existence d’activités artisanales et commerciales variées incluses dans l’ensemble du domaine urbain tout au long de l’Antiquité.

Biographie: Actuellement membre de l’École des Hautes Études Hispaniques et Ibériques de la Casa de Velázquez à Madrid et à partir d’octobre 2017, chercheur au Centre Camille Jullian (CNRS, Aix-en-Provence), Touatia Amraoui est docteur en Histoire et Archéologie de l’Université Lumière Lyon 2. Elle est l’auteur d’articles sur l’artisanat et l’économie dans le Maghreb antique. Elle a collaboré à plusieurs projets de recherche internationaux en Algérie, au Maroc, en France, en Espagne et en Angleterre.
Roman Frontier Studies 2009 Proceedings of the XXI International Congress of Roman Frontier Studies (Limes Congress) held at Newcastle upon Tyne in August 2009 edited by Nick Hodgson, Paul Bidwell and Judith Schachtmann. Paperback edition; xxii+726 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 336 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 25. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915902. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915919. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The XXI International Congress of Roman Frontier studies was hosted by Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums in Newcastle upon Tyne (Great Britain) in 2009, 60 years after the first Limeskongress organised in that city by Eric Birley in 1949.

Sixty years on, delegates could reflect on how the Congress has grown and changed over six decades and could be heartened at the presence of so many young scholars and a variety of topics and avenues of research into the army and frontiers of the Roman empire that would not have been considered in 1949.

Papers are organised into the same thematic sessions as in the actual conference: Women and Families in the Roman Army; Roman Roads; The Roman Frontier in Wales; The Eastern and North African Frontiers; Smaller Structures: towers and fortlets; Recognising Differences in Lifestyles through Material Culture; Barbaricum; Britain; Roman Frontiers in a Globalised World; Civil Settlements; Death and Commemoration; Danubian and Balkan Provinces; Camps; Logistics and Supply; The Germanies and Augustan and Tiberian Germany; Spain; Frontier Fleets.

This wide-ranging collection of papers enriches the study of Roman frontiers in all their aspects.

About the Editors:
Nick Hodgson is Archaeological Projects Manager for Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums and has excavated for many years at South Shields, Wallsend and other sites on the northern frontier of Roman Britain. He has published widely on Iron Age and Roman archaeology and is the author of Hadrian’s Wall: Archaeology and History at the limit of Rome’s empire (2017).

Paul Bidwell was Head of Archaeology at Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums for almost three decades until his retirement in 2013. He has published numerous monographs, excavation reports and articles and is the author of Roman Forts in Britain (1997 and 2007). He is now an independent researcher and archaeological and heritage consultant.

Judith Schachtmann obtained an MA at Humboldt University, Berlin, with a comparison of German, British and Irish archaeological world heritage sites. For two years she was a researcher in the DFG (German Research Foundation) and is currently working on a PhD thesis on archaeological museums and exhibitions in Saxony during the national socialist era.


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Birds, Beasts and Burials: A study of the human-animal relationship in Romano-British St. Albans by Brittany Elayne Hill. vi+204 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 35 colour plates. 333 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 24. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915964. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915971. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The human-animal relationship is one that has been pondered by scholars for ages. It has been used to define both what it means to be human and what it means to be animal. Birds, Beasts and Burials examines human-animal relationships as found in the mortuary record within the area of Verulamium that is now situated in the modern town of St. Albans. Once considered a major centre, the mortuary rites given to its people suggest high variabilities in the approach to the personhood of certain classes of both people and animals. While 480 human individuals were examined, only a small percentage was found to have been afforded the rite of a human-animal co-burial. It is this small percentage that is examined in greater detail. Of major concern are the treatments to both the human and animal pre- and post- burial and the point at which the animal enters into the funerary practice.

About the Author:
Dr Brittany Elayne Hill is an American archaeologist who completed her undergraduate studies at University of Kansas in 2009 before coming to the University of Southampton in 2010 to pursue her master’s degree, which was then followed up by her acceptance to a PhD course in 2011. An ongoing fascination with Romano-British culture and osteology inspired her to engage in research covered in this book. She is particularly pleased by the combined representation of human osteology and zooarchaeology demonstrated in this monograph, as both play roles in the formation of the Romano-British burials found in St. Albans. This is her first monograph and she is excited to release the results of her PhD work to the public sphere for the first time. She is hopeful that the content of this monograph inspires others to consider the influence human-animal relationships have on the formation of ancient and modern cultures alike.
‘Poedicvlorvm oppida’ Spazi urbani della Puglia centrale in età romana by Custode Silvio Fioriello. 248 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English summary. 331 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 23. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915926. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915933. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The indigenous persistence, texture, articulation, shape and functionality of the urban definition of the municipia in central Apulia demonstrate the nature of the complex history and settlement of this area in the long period between the age of Romanization and the third century AD. The comprehensive collection and examination of the material evidence make it possible to reconstruct – for the first time, in an organic manner and in a global framework – the profile of the urban space of ‘Poediculorum oppida’. This has been carried out according to a dynamic perspective that reveals signs of restructuring and approval, of novelty and vibrancy, of strength and interaction, to make possible the reconsideration of that stubborn idea, prevalent until recently, of an ineluctable ‘crisis’, and to draw a picture of urban geography calibrated according to an intense and morphogenetic tension in terms of the assimilation of Roman culture and adaptation to local conditions.

Italian description: Persistenza indigena, consistenza, articolazione, forma e funzionalità urbanistiche dei municipia della Puglia centrale consentono di leggere la complessa vicenda storica e insediativa di questo comparto nel lungo periodo esteso fra l’età della romanizzazione e il III sec. d.C. La raccolta e disamina complessive del patrimonio documentario permettono così di ricostruire – per la prima volta, in maniera organica e in un disegno globale – il profilo dello spazio urbano dei ‘Poediculorum oppida’ secondo una prospettiva dinamica che lascia cogliere segni di ristrutturazione e di omologazione, di novità e di vivacità, di rottura e di interazione, per provare a riconsiderare quell’idea pervicace di ineluttabile ‘crisi’ tradita fino a tempi recenti e a tracciare un quadro poleografico calibrato su una intensa e morfogenetica tensione fra metabolismo e simbiosi.
Ländliche Siedlungsstrukturen im römischen Spanien Das Becken von Vera und das Camp de Tarragona –zwei Mikroregionen im Vergleich by Jan Schneider. vi+214 pages; illustrated throughout with 35 plates in colour. German text; concluding chapter in German and English. 317 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 22. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915544. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915551. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The present study deals with the comparison of rural settlements, aiming to compare developments in various settlements of the Iberian Peninsula during the Roman era. This is to show to what extent structures in the hinterland show parallels or are different from one another and to explore the causes of these similarities and differences. Aspects of the Roman economy must be taken into account as well as the micro-regional influences of pre-Roman settlement or topographical conditions. To achieve this goal, various aspects of rural settlements such as the dating, size or status of a place and its location and environmental conditions are analyzed and related. Archaeological, geographic and statistical methods of investigation are used. These methods, along with the complete resulting data, are fully disclosed in order to allow the comparison to be extended to other regions. The Vera basin and the Camp de Tarragona were chosen as study areas. The former is located in the south-east of the Iberian Peninsula on the Spanish Mediterranean coast, and was seen in the Roman period as the hinterland of the city of Baria, today's Villaricos. Also on the Mediterranean coast of Spain, but in the north, is Camp de Tarragona. The name refers to the surrounding area of the Roman city of Tarraco, capital of the Hispania Tarraconensis province of the same name.

German Description: Die vorliegende Untersuchung beschäftigt sich mit dem Vergleich ländlicher Siedlungsstrukturen. Ziel der Arbeit ist es, die Entwicklungen in verschiedenen Siedlungskammern der Iberischen Halbinsel während der römischen Epoche einander gegenüberzustellen. Dies soll zeigen, inwieweit Strukturen im Hinterland Parallelen aufweisen oder voneinander abweichen und worin die diese Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede begründet sind. Dabei sind Aspekte des römischen Wirtschaftswesens ebenso zu berücksichtigen, wie mikroregionale Einflüsse der vorrömischen Besiedlung oder topographische Gegebenheiten. Um dieses Ziel zu erreichen, werden verschiedene Aspekte ländlicher Siedlungsstrukturen wie Datierung, Größe oder Status eines Platzes und dessen Standort- und Umgebungsbedingungen analysiert und in Beziehung zueinander gesetzt. Dabei kommen archäologische, geographische und statistische Untersuchungsmethoden zum Einsatz. Diese werden ebenso wie sämtliche Daten und Ergebnisse innerhalb der Arbeit vollständig offengelegt, um eine Ausweitung des Vergleichs auf weitere Regionen zu ermöglichen. Als Untersuchungsgebiete wurden das Becken von Vera und das Camp de Tarragona ausgewählt. Ersteres liegt im Südosten der Iberischen Halbinsel an der spanischen Mittelmeerküste und war in römischer Zeit als Hinterland der Stadt Baria, dem heutigen Villaricos, anzusehen. Ebenfalls an der Mittelmeerküste Spaniens, jedoch in dessen Norden, liegt das Camp de Tarragona. Der Name bezeichnet das Umland der römischen Stadt Tarraco, Hauptstadt der gleichnamigen Provinz Hispania Tarraconensis.
Jan Schneider studierte Klassische Archäologie und Alte Geschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität in Gießen. Bereits in seiner Magisterarbeit 2010, die in Kooperation zwischen der Universität Gießen und dem Deutschen Archäologischen Institut Madrid betreut wurde, beschäftigte er sich mit dem römischen Spanien. Darauf aufbauend folgte seine Dissertation Ländliche Siedlungsstrukturen im römischen Spanien. Untersuchungen im Becken von Vera und dem Camp de Tarragona die 2015 an der Universität Gießen eingereicht wurde. Er ist seit seinem Studium aktives Mitglied im Netzwerk zur Erforschung der Iberischen Halbinsel (TOLETUM) und arbeitet derzeit als Archäologe in Deutschland.

La Cerámica Común romana en la Bahía Gaditana en Época romana Alfarería y centros de producción by Lourdes Girón Anguiozar. xxii+424 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English introduction. 315 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 21. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915360. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915377. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volumes examines Roman pottery and production centers in modern-day Cádiz.

The innovative aspects of this research are several but we will limit them to three: the typological classification from a closer perspective to the mentality of the old potter; the concept of ‘social measure’, which connects the dimensions of the containers with the type of consumer and social group; and, the ethnoarchaeological aspects applied to the construction of a furnace, which have enabled to better specify various aspects relating to the manufacture of common Roman ceramics.

From a methodological point of view, it is proposed a debate about the concept of ‘common pottery’, which is defined as ceramics intended for a common and multipurpose use, more practical than aesthetic. Likewise, it is exposed the great problem of the typologies, seeking not only a logical classification into types and variants, but also a reference to the artisan work. The theme of the ancient name of Roman ceramic forms is faced in order to call by the old names to the Roman pottery forms found today. The concept of ‘social measure’, unprecedented in this type of analysis, pretends to reach a social accepted measure, obtained with a statistical study. This measure is that one around which the values are concentrated.
Amphorae from the Kops Plateau (Nijmegen) Trade and supply to the Lower-Rhineland from the Augustan period to AD 69/70 edited by C. Carreras and J. van den Berg. x+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 314 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915421. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915438. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the year 19 BC, Roman legions arrived in Nijmegen with the aim of conquering the Rhenish territories from the local populations. In addition to the legionaries themselves, the Roman army required a regular provision of staple supplies in order to keep such a war machine in top condition. The archaeological evidence for this provision is a myriad of organic remains (i.e. seeds, bones, pollen) as well as ceramic containers such as amphorae.

One of the first military camps at Nijmegen, together with that on the Hunerberg, was Kops Plateau. This timber fortress – the most northerly military site of the Julio-Claudian period – dating from 12 BC to AD 69, has provided an extraordinary amphora assemblage. At a time when most Roman roads were still only projects, this distant military outpost received amphora products from all over the Mediterranean basin – from Palestine to Greece in the east to Baetica and northern Africa in the west as well as from the Italian core. In addition to amphorae, Kops Plateau also provided a wide repertory of regional vessels whose contents are unknown.

The amphorae from Kops Plateau represent a singular example of Roman military supply in northern Europe at a very early date. Their analysis sheds light on trading routes in the Atlantic regions, and from Gaul to Germany; indeed also on the Claudian invasion of Britain.
The Nature and Origin of the Cult of Silvanus in the Roman Provinces of Dalmatia and Pannonia by Ljubica Perinić. vi+126 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 306 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 19. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915124. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915131. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Nature and Origin of the Cult of Silvanus in the Roman Provinces of Dalmatia and Pannonia deals with the cult of Silvanus and presents the evidence and current state of research of the cult in Dalmatia and Pannonia to the wider scholarly community. New perceptions on the subject are proposed and a fresh standpoint from which certain problems may be (re)addressed is presented.

About the Author:
Ljubica Perinić studied Archaeology at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Archaeology, where she defended her PhD thesis in 2008. She works at the Division of Archaeology at the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts. She is particularly interested in Roman religion, Roman army, and epigraphy. She lives and works in Zagreb.
An Urban Geography of the Roman World, 100 BC to AD 300 by J. W. Hanson. vii+818 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 284 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 18. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914721. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914738. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Although there have been numerous studies of individual cities or groups of cities, there has never been a study of the urbanism of the Roman world as a whole, meaning that we have been poorly informed not only about the number of cities and how they were distributed and changed over time, but also about their sizes and populations, monumentality, and civic status. This book provides a new account of the urbanism of the Roman world between 100 BC and AD 300. To do so, it draws on a combination of textual sources and archaeological material to provide a new catalogue of cities, calculates new estimates of their areas and uses a range of population densities to estimate their populations, and brings together available information about their monumentality and civic status for the first time. This evidence demonstrates that, although there were relatively few cities, many had considerable sizes and populations, substantial amounts of monumentality, and held various kinds of civic status. This indicates that there was significant economic growth in this period, including both extensive and intensive economic growth, which resulted from an influx of wealth through conquest and the intrinsic changes that came with Roman rule (including the expansion of urbanism). This evidence also suggests that there was a system that was characterized by areas of intense urban demand, which was met through an efficient system for the extraction of necessity and luxury goods from immediate hinterlands and an effective system for bringing these items from further afield. The disruption of these links seems to have put this system under considerable strain towards the end of this period and may have been sufficient to cause its ultimate collapse. This appears to have been in marked contrast to the medieval and early modern periods, when urbanism was more able to respond to changes in supply and demand.

About the author:
J. W. Hanson is a historian and archaeologist specialising in the urbanism and economy of the Greek and Roman world. He holds a B.A. in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History from the University of Oxford, as well as an M.St. in Classical Archaeology and a D.Phil in Archaeology from the same institution. He is now a Research Associate at the University of Colorado, Boulder, working for the Social Reactors project.
The Small Finds and Vessel Glass from Insula VI.1 Pompeii: Excavations 1995-2006 by H.E.M. Cool. xii+304 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 283 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 17. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914523. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914530. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This report presents the vessel glass and small finds found during the excavations between 1995 and 2006 that took place in Insula VI.1, Pompeii (henceforth VI.1). More than 5,000 items are discussed, and the size of the assemblage has meant that the publication is in two parts. The book you are reading consists of the discussion with associated illustrations and the catalogue entries for a subset of the data. The other half is available digitally on the Archaeological Data Service. That part contains the full catalogue of the material recorded, additional contextual information, and details about the initial excavations of the insula during the eighteenth century.
L’artisanat de l’os à l’époque Gallo-Romaine De l’ostéologie à l’archéologie expérimentale by Marc Barbier. ii+ 140 pages; highly illustrated throughout with 57 plates in colour. French text. 263 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 16. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914219. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914226. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The transfer, in 1981, of the town Museum collections in Sens (Yonne) to the old Archbishop’s palace required great discretion and an underground passage was planned between the two buildings. Preventive archaeological excavations unearthed 22 Gallo-Roman bone combs, as well as a further 17 pieces when the excavation area was expanded.

This exceptional concentration of bone artefacts incited the author to start on an experimental search at a time when bone artefacts were not finding much interest among specialists. However, it was extremely adventurous to piece together a bone-worker production line and create a never before archaeologically discovered appliance used in Roman times.

Obviously, the first reproductions have been directed towards combs. Those replicas pointed towards the material constraints, but also defined the constructions of necessary tools to take slabs off and conceive objects.

Moreover, matrix origin – small sized compact bone – explained why bone workers used to juxtapose elements to get suitable surfaces. Various complications during free hand denture sawing led them to perfect another operating system, plausible and more reliable.

Logical follow up would have been to extend experimental investigations, perhaps not to all the bone artefacts, but to a typical class of them, in order to complete the reconstructions of the equipment and suggest a general bone worker’s workshop arrangement.

French Description:
Le transfert, en 1981, des collections du Musée municipal de Sens (Yonne) dans l’ancien palais des Archevêques a nécessité le terrassement d’une jonction souterraine entre deux des bâtiments. Des fouilles archéologiques préventives ont notamment permis de découvrir 22 peignes en os d’époque gallo-romaine, puis 17 autres lors de l’extension du secteur.

Cette exceptionnelle concentration a incité l’auteur à entreprendre une démarche expérimentale à une époque où l’on n’accordait que peu d’intérêt au mobilier osseux. On comprendra qu’il était alors aventureux de vouloir reconstituer la chaîne opératoire d’un tabletier et matérialiser l’appareillage dont on n’a aucun témoignage archéologique.

C’est évidemment sur la mise en œuvre de peignes qu’ont porté les premières reproductions. Ces répliques montraient déjà certaines contraintes liées à la matière elle-même, mais permettaient également de cerner les outils nécessaires au prélèvement des plaquettes et à la conception de l’objet.

Par ailleurs, l’origine des matrices - os compact dimensionnellement limité - expliquait pourquoi les tabletiers juxtaposaient les éléments pour obtenir la surface adéquate. Diverses complications, lors du sciage à main levée de la denture, ont amené à mettre au point un autre mode opératoire plausible et plus assuré.

La suite logique voulait que les recherches expérimentales s’étendent sinon à l’ensemble du mobilier osseux, du moins à des catégories d’objets d’une même typologie permettant de compléter l’outillage et suggérer l’agencement de l’atelier d’un tabletier généraliste.

Moneda Antigua y Vías Romanas en el Noroeste de Hispania by M. Isabel Vila Franco. xii+574 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text throughout. 250 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 15. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913991. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914004. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This work seeks to understand the process of monetization within the economy of the Galicians and Asturians and the cultural ways in which the phenomenon occurred. Numismatic remains are studied in depth, found in four of the roads crossing the northwestern territory of the Iberian peninsula in Roman times; the tracks studied, as referenced in the Itinerary of Antonino, were XVII, XVIII, XIX and XX.

All the coins discovered were imported, and so it was possible to mark precisely where the greatest influx of individuals and materials came from, as well as areas and zones of different speeds of monetization and, thus, Romanization.

Spanish Description:
A través de este trabajo hemos pretendido comprender el proceso de monetización de la economía de galaicos y astures y las vías culturales por las que el fenómeno se produjo. Para ello hemos estudiado en profundidad los restos numismáticos aparecidos en cuatro de las calzadas que atravesaban el territorio noroccidental de la península ibérica en época romana, las vías XVII, XVIII, XIX y XX del Itinerario de Antonino.

Debido a que toda la moneda que encontramos en este territorio es importada, hemos podido marcar con precisión cuáles fueron los horizontes de mayor entrada de individuos y materias, así como áreas y zonas de diferentes velocidades de monetización y con ello de romanización. Seguramente las zonas cercanas a campamentos, dónde se alojaron miles de soldados cuya única economía posible era la monetaria, conocieron y dependieron pronto del valor de la moneda. Igualmente los nuevos núcleos romanos administrativos hubieron de ser centros focales de monetización, aunque desconocemos el por qué no se abrieron cecas de moneda en estas ricas ciudades con importante tráfico de mineral y de gentes, como pueda ser el caso de Astorga o Braga.

M. Isabel Vila Franco es doctora en Arqueología desde 2012 por la Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (España). Ha disfrutado de diferentes becas para la catalogación de material arqueológico depositado en instituciones museográficas y además, desde 2003 ha colaborado en varios proyectos de investigación europeos y nacionales en el Instituto de Historia del CSIC (Madrid). Sus principales líneas de investigación, plasmadas en diversas publicaciones, han estado siempre vinculadas con los procesos de monetización y con la circulación de moneda en relación con las vías de comunicación, especialmente en el Noroeste de Hispania.
Inter Moesos et Thraces The Rural Hinterland of Novae in Lower Moesia (1st – 6th Centuries AD) by Agnieszka Tomas. x+234 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 5 colour plates. 246 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 14. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913694. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913700. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman legionary base at Novae in Lower Moesia is one of the most important sites in the Lower Danubian provinces. Towards late Antiquity, the military camp was transformed into a civil town with Episcopal residence and survived until the beginning of the 7th century. The Polish-Bulgarian excavations carried out for more than 55 years revealed remains dated from the mid-1st up to the early Byzantine periods and more than 300 inscriptions on stone. The rural hinterland of Novae is exceptional and fascinating for the historian and archaeologist, not only due to the importance of the site itself, but also due to its location. The legionary camp at Novae was located halfway between the outlets of two rivers – the Osăm and Jantra, flowing nearly parallel to each other. This part of the Danubian Plain was inhabited by Geto-Thracians and tribes influenced by the Celts. The special position of the lands between the Osăm and Jantra rivers is well-expressed by a series of boundary stones set up in AD 136 by Emperor Hadrian, who divided the tribal territories of Moesos and Thraces. This special geopolitical situation must have caused considerable difficulties in administering the area by the Romans. At present this poses a challenge for scholars, who search for answers to various questions concerning the universal solutions applied in borderlands in the past.
Diseños geométricos en los mosaicos del Conventus Astigitanus by Sebastián Vargas Vázquez. vi+342; highly illustrated throughout with 170 colour plates. Spanish text with English summary. 240 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 13. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912734. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912741. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume focuses on the study of the geometric designs documented in the mosaics of the Conventus Astigitanus, one of the four conventi iuridici of Roman Baetica. This study is part of a much broader undertaking, the primary objective of which is the analysis of the geometric mosaic designs of the province as a whole.

The number of mosaics in the Conventus Astigitanus, and the larger number still documented in other areas of Baetica, place this province among those with the highest count of mosaics in the Roman world providing evidence of the level of cultural and economic power enjoyed by the province over the centuries.

As a whole, this study makes an absolutely necessary contribution to the understanding of Roman mosaics in general and Hispanic mosaics in particular, based on an innovative and unprecedented approach in Spain. It includes a very significant number of designs and provides the basis for a completely open catalogue, to which new models may be added as they become available through the continual study of new mosaics. This catalogue ultimately aims to become a reference for the study of geometric mosaics and compositions in the Roman world. Moreover, the value of the present volume also lies in the contribution that is offered to a topic, the analysis of geometric composition, which is of great interest beyond the author’s specific field of study.
Late Roman Handmade Grog-Tempered Ware Producing Industries in South East Britain by Malcolm Lyne. xii+179 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 202 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 12. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912376. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912383. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The appearance and revival of handmade grog-tempered ware producing pottery industries during the late 3rd and 4th centuries using technology more appropriate to the Late Iron Age in the south and south-east of Britain is something of an enigma. This revival in the popularity of such primitive pottery took place on the Isle of Wight and in the Hampshire Basin, East Sussex and Kent at a time when the production of Romanised wheel-turned grey and fine colour-coated wares was still on a large scale in the south of Britain and elsewhere in the British provinces.

This publication is the result of 25 years research into these grog-tempered wares: it presents corpora of forms associated with the various industries and discusses the distributions of their products at different periods. It also discusses the possible reasons for the revival of such wares, increasing popularity during the 4th century and disappearance during the 5th century AD.
La implantación del culto imperial de la provincia en Hispania by Marta González Herrero. x+150 pages; 18 black & white illustrations. Spanish text with English summary. 193 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 11. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911768. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911775. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The aim of this study is to show how the Imperial Cult was introduced and organised in provincial Hispania, and examines the collaboration with the Romanised native elites who came from Lusitania, Baetica and Hispania Citerior. This book draws upon literary, numismatic, archaeological and epigraphic sources. The epigraphy found in Lusitania is especially important because it is the only one of the Hispanic provinces where there is evidence of flamines provinciae officiating before the Flavian period, even as early as under Tiberius.
Die Römische Villa als Indikator provinzialer Wirtschafts- und Gesellschaftsstrukturen by Mareike Rind. vi+286; illustrated throughout in black & white. German text with extensive English summary. 178 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911683. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911690. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The investigation of the Roman villa and its economic structures in the western provinces of the Roman Empire has clearly shown that rural settlement developed at different paces and intensities that largely depended on the specific region in which a villa landscape was intended and created. The progress of Romanisation was strongly linked to the existence of pre- Roman infrastructure in a given region (e.g. Tres Galliae: Celtic; Narbonensis: Greek; Northern Africa: Punic). This existing infrastructure was at first acquired and successively intensified by the Romans.

In its sum, the Roman villa economy was a complex and dynamic system that in its configuration vastly differed, according to the specific province. Still, the system essentially served clear functional purposes such as self-subsistence and, ideally, surplus production for the supply of the Roman military in newly conquered provinces. Besides that, the implementation of a villa landscape in a province, often carried by veterans and other groups of Italic origin, the Roman villa network took the role as a carrier of processes that evolve around the term Romanisation during the phase of Roman conquest and authority.
A Study of the Deposition and Distribution of Copper Alloy Vessels in Roman Britain by Jason Lundock. vi+258 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 171 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 9. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911805. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911812. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

By examining patterns in depositional practice as well as the geographic and site distribution of copper alloy vessels in Roman Britain, this book offers an analysis of the varying and divergent practices of material culture in the British provinces under Roman rule. The work also seeks to offer a useful classification system for the study and discussion of copper alloy vessels by adapting familiar typology as well as introducing new vocabulary. Analysis is given to patterns in the deposition of vessel forms during the Roman period in Britain as well as addressing their spatial relation to other objects and their use of decoration. Insight is also offered into the functional application of these objects and how changing culture practice led to the shifting of use from smaller vessel forms in the early Roman period to larger vessel forms by Late Antiquity. Additionally, the discussion offered in this book serves as a case study in the application of small finds research to the larger theoretical debates concerning Rome and its provinces.
Romans, Rubbish, and Refuse The archaeobotanical assemblage of Regione VI, insula I, Pompeii by Charlene Alexandria Murphy. xii+137 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 1 colour plate. 152 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 8. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911157. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911164. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Although world-renowned, Pompeii, the first Roman site to be excavated and one of the most visited and best-studied archaeological sites in the world, still has unanswered questions to yield, especially in terms of its long-term development from pre-Roman times. The extensive excavations (1995–2006) by the Anglo-American Project in Pompeii (AAPP) has provided a rare insight into chronological change within the city of Pompeii. This research was significant as an insula block within the city of Pompeii had never previously been excavated in its entirety. The analysis of all the recovered seeds, fruits and cereal remains has provided a unique research opportunity to undertake a diachronic study of urban Roman plant food consumption and discards. Over the past two centuries of excavations at Pompeii only a handful of published works dealing with botanical evidence have been published. The results from this study demonstrate a standard Mediterranean archaeobotanical assemblage recovered from Insula VI.1 which included wheat, barley, legumes, olives, grapes and figs. A wider diversity of fruits, pulses, and additional cereals, especially broomcorn millet were also found. These results support the established view that Pompeii was a fully urbanised city in the 1st century B.C.
I vetri del Museo archeologico di Tripoli by Sofia Cingolani. ii+182 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 colour plates. Italian text. 142 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910945. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910952. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is focused on the cataloguing of glass conserved in the Archaeological Museum of Tripoli. This is so far an unpublished corpus of objects identified from investigations into the necropolis and other burials in Tripoli and its suburbs, in conjunction with the activities of the Italian Government in Libya during the first twenty years of the last century. The main objective of the work is filling the gaps in the state of knowledge concerning the production of glass of the North-African area by providing as complete as possible a documentation on the findings from Oea and its territory.
Egyptian Cultural Identity in the Architecture of Roman Egypt (30 BC-AD 325) by Youssri Ezzat Hussein Abdelwahed. x+222 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 134 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910648. £37.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910655. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Egyptian Cultural Identity in the Architecture of Roman Egypt (30 BC–AD 325) considers the relationship between architectural form and different layers of identity assertion in Roman Egypt. The Roman province of Aegyptus was a peculiar province such that many scholars have generally assumed that it was given a special status in the Roman Empire. The text covers the period from the Roman conquest of Egypt under Octavian in 30 BC to the official recognition of Christianity in AD 325. It stresses the sophistication of the concept of identity, and the complex yet close association between architecture and identity. This monograph is the outcome of four years of research at the Department of Classics and Ancient History, the University of Durham. The book will be of interest and value for both Classicists and Egyptologists working on the archaeology of Egypt under Roman rule and the concept of identity.
The Early and Late Roman Rural Cemetery at Nemesbőd (Vas County, Hungary) edited by Gábor Ilon and Judit Kvassay. x+194 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 132 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910488. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910495. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman Cemetery at Nemesbőd belonged to a settlement or a villa which was located on the territory of the Roman colony of Savaria (present day Szombathey, Hungary) in Pannonia. The book deals with thirty-seven graves, which consisted of mainly cremation but also of some inhumation burials. Detailed analysis of grave goods (bronze vessels, pottery, glass, personal accessories, lamps etc.) provides a study of burial customs and their evolution. In addition, specialist reports on human remains and animal bone as well as on epigraphic material are presented.

La difusión comercial de las ánforas vinarias de Hispania Citerior-Tarraconensis (s. I a.C. – I. d.C.) edited by Verònica Martínez Ferreras. x+220 pages; illustrated in colour and black & white throughout. Papers in Spanish and French with English abstracts; Preface in Spanish and English. 130 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910624. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910631. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents a series of studies of the wine from Hispania Citerior-Tarraconensis traded in amphorae, with the aim of demonstrating (as has recently been done for the amphora production) the existence of different trade dynamics, according to individual cases, territories and periods. While seeking to avoid descriptions of a generalised nature, the present volume aims to illustrate the complexity of the trading system, emphasizing intra- and inter-provincial commercial patterns and the way in which these evolved during the period considered. Although this work includes the results of a few highly specific case studies (which cannot replace the findings from other better or lesser known sites), they cover most of the areas of wine production and trade and all the dimensions of analysis in which archaeological, epigraphic and literary data related to the commercial distribution might be framed.
Diana Umbronensis a Scoglietto Santuario, Territorio e Cultura Materiale (200 a.C. - 550 d.C.) edited by Alessandro Sebastiani, Elena Chirico, Matteo Colombini and Mario Cygielman. x+396 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Papers in Italian with English abstracts. 129 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910525. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910532. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is the first in a series of works detailing the archaeological investigations of the ager Rusellanus, in coastal southern Etruria, undertaken by the Alberese Archaeological Project.

It focuses on the Roman temple and sanctuary dedicated to Diana Umbronensis, located at Scoglietto (Alberese – GR) on the ancient Tyrrhenian coast. In so doing it adds to the study of trade and settlement networks in ancient Italy, and provides new data on the character of Roman and late antique Etruria.

The book discusses the changing aspect and character of the sanctuary over approximately eight centuries – from its foundation in the mid-2nd century BC and substantial refurbishment in the Antonine period, to its destruction in the 4th century AD and the varied use and reuse of the site through the following two centuries. It includes archaeological, historical and landscape studies, as well as detailed architectural and material culture studies for a composite interpretation of the site and its history.
The Arverni and Roman Wine Roman Amphorae from Late Iron Age sites in the Auvergne (Central France): Chronology, fabrics and stamps by Matthew Loughton. ix+626 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 126 2014 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 2. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910426. £77.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910433. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Large numbers of Greco-Italic and Dressel 1 amphorae were exported to many parts of Gaul during the late Iron Age and they provide a major source of information on the development and growth of the Roman economy during the late Republican period. This volume examines in detail this trade to the Auvergne region of central France and provides a typological and chronological study of the main assemblages of Republican amphorae found on the farms, agglomerations, oppida, and funerary sites, dating from the second century BC until the early first century AD. Other topics examined include the provenance of the amphorae, the stamps, painted inscriptions and graffiti, the distribution of Republican amphorae in the Auvergne, and the evidence for their modification and reuse. Finally, a gazetteer of Republican amphora findspots from France is also provided.
Römisches Zaumzeug aus Pompeji, Herculaneum und Stabiae Metallzäume, Trensen und Kandaren by Christina Simon. vi+240 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. German text with English summary. 121 2014 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910341. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910358. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Few regions possess so many and mainly complete Roman bridles as do the Vesuvian sites. Singular find conditions permit both comprehensive antiquarian-historian analyses of their production, functionality, and everyday use and new approaches to their typology and chronology. The 103 catalogued specimens belong to four types of bronze headstalls, namely metallic noseband, bitless metal bridle (“hackamore”), multipartite metallic bridle (“metallic halter”), and muzzle as well as two types of bits, namely snaffle bit with circular cheekpieces and curb bit. All of them occurred in more or less numerous variants of local or provincial origin. Special attention is paid to the reconstruction of application methods and combinations of types as well as the replica of a snaffle bit with circular cheekpieces. Bitless metal bridles followed Greek models, multipartite metallic bridles Celtiberian ones and, in combination with Thracian or Italian curb bits, formed typical military bridles. All Campanian finds came from civilian contexts such as luxury villae, villae rusticae, urban houses, and workshops. Thanks to find circumstances they can be attributed to draught animals, beasts of burden or mounts (horse, donkey, mule) which also showed up in stables and skeletal remains.
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