​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
NEW: Early Medieval Settlement in Upland Perthshire: Excavations at Lair, Glen Shee 2012-17 by David Strachan, David Sneddon and Richard Tipping. Hardback; 205x290mm; 202 pages; 85 figures; 18 tables (63 pages in colour). (RRP £29.00). 579 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693157. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693164. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological evidence for settlement and land use in early medieval Scottish upland landscapes remains largely undiscovered. This study records only the second excavation of one important and distinctive house form, the Pitcarmicktype building, in the hills of north-east Perth and Kinross. Excavation of seven turf buildings at Lair in Glen Shee has confirmed the introduction of Pitcarmick buildings in the early 7th century AD. Clusters of these at Lair, and elsewhere in the hills, are interpreted as integrated, spatially organised farm complexes comprising byre-houses and outbuildings. Their form has more to do with contemporary traditions across the North Sea than with local styles.

There is a close link between 7th-century climatic amelioration and their spread across the hills, and it is argued that this was a purposeful re-occupation of a neglected landscape. Pitcarmick buildings were constructed and lived in by precocious, knowledgeable, and prosperous farming communities. Pollen analysis has shown the upland economy to have been arable as well as pastoral, and comparable contemporary economic ‘recovery’ is suggested from similar analyses across Scotland. The farms at Lair were stable and productive until the 11th century when changes, poorly understood, saw their demise.
About the Authors
David Strachan has worked in curatorial field archaeology in Wales, England and Scotland, at both national and local level, over the last 30 years. Having established the Historic Environment Record and planning archaeology service for Perth and Kinross in 2000, as Director of Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust he maintains interests in the Scottish ‘long’ Iron Age, intertidal and upland archaeology, and aerial photography.

David Sneddon has 20 years professional experience in archaeology, the last eight years of which were with Northlight Heritage where he was Project Manager. He recently co-founded Clyde Archaeology who provide archaeological and heritage services across the UK.

Richard Tipping has worked on problems of interpreting northern British landscapes since 1984 as a palaeo-ecologist, historical geomorphologist, geo-archaeologist and environmental historian. He has authored, co-authored and edited twelve books and more than 250 peer-reviewed and other contributions.
NEW: Les restes humains badegouliens de la Grotte du Placard Cannibalisme et guerre il y a 20,000 ans by Bruno Boulestin and Dominique Henry-Gambier. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+138 pages; 47 figures, 14 tables (56 pages of colour). 579 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693690. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693706. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Placard is a major Upper Palaeolithic site in France, known from as early as the middle of the nineteenth century. Paradoxically, owing to the antiquity of the poorly-documented early excavations, dozens of thousands of remains that were uncovered then are either unpublished to this day, or have only been the subjects of limited and often obsolete studies. This is the case in particular for the human remains, for which, until recently, the cultural attribution was moreover still under debate. Dating makes it clear they belong to various periods, yet most of them form a homogeneous group remarkable by traces of a specific treatment. Thanks to radiocarbon dating and to data from further excavations carried out some thirty years ago, this group can be dated from the Badegoulian period.

The writers present in this book a detailed study of the Badegoulian human remains. On the basis of quantification and bone modification analyses, they describe and identify the treatments of the dead. Whereas the general treatment pertains to the practice of cannibalism, more specific ones, focused on the head, can be explained by the crafting of trophies. On the whole, these treatments can be interpreted in a consistent manner by one or several episodes of armed conflicts, begging the question of the possible existence of warfare during the Upper Palaeolithic. Thus, despite the antiquity of the discovery, the Badegoulian human bones from le Placard still constitute a unique assemblage that contributes greatly to our knowledge of the behaviours of hunter-gatherer populations in European prehistory.

About the Authors
Bruno Boulestin and Dominique Henry-Gambier are anthropologists at the University of Bordeaux (France), members of the research unit ‘De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie’ (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). They are working on practices surrounding death in ancient societies, from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data. B. Boulestin’s work deals more specifically with bone modifications and the treatments of corpses. D. Henry-Gambier is a former Research Director at France's National Scientific Research Centre (CNRS) and is a specialist of Upper Palaeolithic populations.

French Description:
Connu depuis le milieu du 19e siècle, le site du Placard est un site majeur du Paléolithique supérieur français. Paradoxalement, en raison de l’ancienneté des premières fouilles, mal documentées, les dizaines de milliers de vestiges qui y ont été découverts sont pour la plupart inédits ou n’ont fait l’objet que d’études ponctuelles et souvent obsolètes. C’est le cas en particulier des restes humains, dont l’attribution culturelle était par ailleurs jusqu’à récemment discutée. Leur datation montre qu’ils appartiennent à plusieurs époques, mais la plus grande partie d’entre eux constitue un lot homogène qui se distingue par les traces d’un traitement spécifique. Grâce au radiocarbone et aux données provenant de nouvelles fouilles menées il y a une trentaine d’années, ce lot peut être daté du Badegoulien.

Les auteurs livrent ici l’étude détaillée de ces restes humains badegouliens. À partir de l’analyse quantitative et de celle des modifications osseuses, ils décrivent et identifient les traitements des morts. L’un, général, renvoie à la pratique du cannibalisme, tandis que d’autres, particuliers à la tête, peuvent s’expliquer par la fabrication de trophées. Globalement, ces traitements peuvent être interprétés de façon cohérente par un ou plusieurs épisodes de conflits armés, ce qui conduit à s’interroger sur la possible existence de la guerre au Paléolithique supérieur. Ainsi, malgré l’ancienneté de leur découverte, les restes humains badegouliens du Placard forment un ensemble exceptionnel qui apporte une contribution importante à notre connaissance des comportements des populations de chasseurs-cueilleurs de la Préhistoire europé
NEW: The Beau Street, Bath Hoard by Verity Anthony, Richard Abdy and Stephen Clews. Hardback; 205x290mm; 338 pages; 36 figures; 57 plates containing images of 1524 coins (75 pages in colour). 578 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 59. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915940. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915957. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Beau Street Hoard is one of the most remarkable archaeological discoveries ever to be made in Bath: the Roman town of Aquae Sulis. The discovery captured the public imagination and it became the focus for a major scientific investigation and a significant learning and public engagement programme. Carefully excavated by professional archaeologists the hoard was recovered intact and removed to the British Museum for more detailed examination and study. It was found to have been deposited in a cist in at least eight bags. Micro-investigation of the hoard in a conservation laboratory and further scientific analysis revealed more fascinating details and information reported on here. The Beau Street, Bath Hoard provides a thorough and complete publication and analysis of the hoard, which is one of the largest yet found in a Roman town in Britain. The high quality of the recovery and investigation process means that it makes a significant contribution to both archaeological and numismatic studies.

About the Authors
Verity Anthony is Visitor Experience and Collections Manager at Cornwall’s Regimental Museum. Prior to that she has worked in collections roles at the Museum of London and at The Roman Baths, where she played a major part in the Beau Street Hoard project.

Richard Abdy has been curator of Roman coins at the British Museum for many years, with particular interest in the middle and later imperial periods of the Roman Empire. He is in the process of publishing RIC II.3 on the coinage of Hadrian and has had long experience of recording Roman coin hoards through work on Treasure cases in England.

Stephen Clews is the Manager of the Roman Baths and Pump Room in Bath, where he has worked on the re-development and re-display of the site and its collections for more than thirty years. He also enjoys an occasional glass of spa water.
NEW: Dating Urban Classical Deposits: Approaches and Problems in Using Finds to Date Strata by Guido Furlan. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+288 pages; 153 figures, 6 tables (71 pages in colour). 576 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692525. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692532. Book contents pageDownload

Dating Urban Classical Deposits: Approaches and problems in using finds to date strata considers the issues surrounding the dating of archaeological strata on the basis of the assemblages recovered from them. This process is one of the most common processes in archaeology, yet it is still poorly structured theoretically, methodologically and operatively. No manuals specifically tackle the issue as a whole and consideration of useful theoretical and methodological tools is fragmentary. This book has been developed to try to correct this failing; it is based on the idea that for dating a given layer through the materials recovered from it, the embedding process of the materials must be modelled.

The book reviews the present state of archaeological practice and follows this with a theoretical discussion of the key concepts involved in the issue of dating deposits; the main methodological tools which can be employed (quantitative, qualitative and comparative) are then discussed in detail. The text presents a problem-oriented taxonomy of deposits, with depositional models for assessing how different assemblages can be analysed for dating; each type of deposit is accompanied by case studies where the methodological tools used are explained. Finally, a structured working method is proposed.

The topic of dating deposits crosses the chronological and spatial borders of many archaeologies, but the book focusses on Classical cities (particularly Roman), as they present specific traits (continuous occupation, high rates of residuality, high impact architecture, waste management etc.) making them unique fields for study.

About the Author
Guido Furlan is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Padova, where he achieved his doctorate in 2015. His current research focuses on Roman archaeology and post-excavation methodologies. He was involved, among others, in the investigation of the forum of Nora (Sardinia) until 2008, and in the excavation of the House of Titus Macer, Aquileia, from 2009 to 2013. He is currently working on the theatre of the ancient city.
NEW: Pottery from Roman Malta by Maxine Anastasi with contributions by David Cardona and Nathaniel Cutajar. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+176 pages; 87 figures, 7 tables. 574 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693294. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693300. Book contents pageDownload

Much of what is known about Malta’s ancient material culture has come to light as a result of antiquarian research or early archaeological work—a time where little attention was paid to stratigraphic context. This situation has in part contributed to the problem of reliably sourcing and dating Maltese Roman-period pottery, particularly locally produced forms common on nearly all ancient Maltese sites. This book presents a comprehensive study of Maltese pottery forms from key stratified deposits spanning the first century BC to mid-fourth century AD. Ceramic material from three Maltese sites was analysed and quantified in a bid to understand Maltese pottery production during the Roman period, and trace the type and volume of ceramic-borne goods that were circulating the central Mediterranean during the period. A short review of the islands’ recent literature on Roman pottery is discussed, followed by a detailed contextual summary of the archaeological contexts presented in this study. The work is supplemented by a detailed illustrated catalogue of all the forms identified within the assemblages, presenting the wide range of locally produced and imported pottery types typical of the Maltese Roman period.

About the Author
Maxine Anastasi is a Lecturer at the Department of Classics and Archaeology, University of Malta. She was awarded a D.Phil. in Archaeology from the University of Oxford for her thesis on small-island economies in the Central Mediterranean. Her research primarily focuses on Roman pottery in the central Mediterranean, with a particular emphasis on Maltese assemblages.
NEW: From Hispalis to Ishbiliyya: The Ancient Port of Seville, from the Roman Empire to the End of the Islamic Period (45 BC – AD 1248) by Carlos Cabrera Tejedor. Paperback; 205x290mm; xx+216 pages; 170 figures, 5 tables (92 plates in colour). (Print RRP £45.00). 534 2019. ISBN 9781789690583. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

From Hispalis to Ishbiliyya: The ancient port of Seville, from the Roman Empire to the end of the Islamic period (45 BC - AD 1248) focuses on the history and development of the ancient port of Seville, which is located in the lower Guadalquivir River Basin, Spain. This unique study is important because, despite its commercial importance, little has been known about the port, and so the purpose was to examine the topography, layout, and facilities of the ancient port of Seville, their history and development from approximately the 1st c. BC to about the 13th c. AD. This longue durée study was conducted adopting a holistic and interdisciplinary approach by examining a diverse range of information (historical, archaeological and scientific), a maritime archaeological perspective as well as a diachronic study of three different historical periods (Roman, Late Antique, Islamic). As a result, it has been possible to offer a description of the construction, development, and demise of the port. The study was one of the first comprehensive studies of an ancient port in Spain and one of the first to be conducted in a combined holistic and diachronic manner in Europe. This methodology has produced significant results not obtained with other simpler approaches, thus serving as a model for studies of other archaeological sites, especially those in relation with maritime or riverine culture.

About the Author
Carlos Cabrera Tejedor is a maritime archaeologist with a diverse and multi-disciplinary background and an interest in shipbuilding and ports. He started as a conservator, completing two bachelor’s degrees, one in Fine Arts Restoration and the other in Archaeological Conservation. He also completed a Master of Arts degree in Nautical Archaeology from Texas A&M University, worked as a project director and research associate at the Institute of Nautical Archaeology (INA), and a received a DPhil in Archaeology at the University of Oxford.

Regarding the study of ancient ships, Dr Cabrera conducted the study of the Mazarrón 1 shipwreck, a 7th century BC Phoenician boat excavated in Spain that constitutes the only known example of hull-remains from that century. He also completed a post-doctoral research study, at the University of Oxford, on the hull of Ship 11, a 5th – 4th century BC ritual vessel excavated in the Grand Canal of Thonis-Heracleion (Egypt) associated with the Mysteries of Osiris and his Temple. Included among Dr Cabrera’s on-going international collaborations is a project with the Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arte e Paesaggio per le Province di Pisa, where he is responsible for studying and publishing the naval architecture of a number of Roman vessels excavated at the Pisa-San Rossore train station, Pisa (Italy).
NEW: Carving Interactions: Rock Art in the Nomadic Landscape of the Black Desert, North-Eastern Jordan by Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+206 pages; 216 figures, 32 tables (129 colour pages). 577 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693119. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693126. Book contents pageDownload

The Safaitic rock art of the North Arabian basalt desert is a unique and understudied material, one of the few surviving traces of the elusive herding societies that inhabited this region in antiquity. Yet little is known about this rock art and its role in the desert societies. Why did these peoples make carvings in the desert and what was the significance of this cultural practice? What can the rock art tell us about the relationship between the nomads and their desert landscape? This book investigates these questions through a comprehensive study of over 4500 petroglyphs from the Jebel Qurma region of the Black Desert in north-eastern Jordan. It explores the content of the rock art, how it was produced and consumed by its makers and audience, and its relationship with the landscape. This is the first-ever systematic study of the Safaitic petroglyphs from the Black Desert and it is unique for the study of Arabian rock art. It demonstrates the value of a material approach to rock art and the unique insights that rock art can provide into the relationship between nomadic herders and the wild and domestic landscape.

About the Author
Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard (PhD, Leiden University) is an archaeologist specialising in rock art studies and social zooarchaeology. Nathalie has worked on excavations in the Netherlands and Germany and on rock art surveys in Jordan and the USA.
NEW: I Nebrodi nell’antichità: Città Culture Paesaggio by Francesco Collura. Paperback; 205x290mm; 384 figures (208 colour pages). Italian text with English Summary. 577 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692648. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692655. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Nebrodi mountains run along the central-northern part of Sicily. It is an area characterised by high ground that rises abruptly from the Tyrrhenian coast, separated by narrow valleys crossed by creeks and a few flat areas. Human presence there is very old due to the abundance of natural resources (water, wood, fertile land) and a favourable climate. In classical times, many cities prospered here, usually on well-defended hilltops; the archaic indigenous settlements encountered Greek culture from the 6th century BC, but they can be defined as totally Hellenized only after the middle of the 4th century BC.

The phase of greatest prosperity was the Hellenistic age, especially following the Roman conquest of Sicily. Important centres were, among others, Tyndaris, Halaesa, Kale Akte and Herbita. Their wealth derived from the great availability of natural resources and from direct or indirect trade with the rest of the island, the Italian peninsula and other areas of the Mediterranean, especially those overlooking the sea. The birth of many of these settlements often dates back to prehistory and the existence of some of them has continued until today. The physical characteristics of this mountainous part of Sicily, along with its remoteness from the main cities of antiquity, affected the forms of human occupation and the growth of an autonomous culture.

The Nebrodi have long remained archeologically unexplored: research and excavations were few and concentrated mainly on certain sites (particularly Tyndaris and Halaesa). Therefore, the history of these districts is still almost unknown. This volume presents the author’s many years of research, hoping to increase the knowledge of many aspects of this part of the island: the meeting between indigenous and Greek cultures, their coexistence, the types of settlement and the organization of cities, the trade and the local productions.

I Monti Nebrodi occupano la parte centro-settentrionale della Sicilia. Si tratta di un’area caratterizzata da rilievi che si elevano repentinamente dalla costa tirrenica, separati da strette vallate percorse da torrenti e con poche aree pianeggianti. La frequentazione umana è antichissima e fu agevolata dalla ricchezza di risorse naturali (acqua, boschi, terreni fertili) e da un clima molto favorevole. In epoca classica qui prosperarono numerose città, sorte in genere su rilievi ben difendibili; gli insediamenti indigeni incontrarono la cultura greca a partire dal VI secolo a.C. ma si possono definire totalmente ellenizzati solo dopo la metà del IV secolo a.C. La fase di maggiore prosperità fu l’età ellenistica, soprattutto quella successiva alla conquista romana della Sicilia: centri importanti furono, tra gli altri, Tyndaris, Halaesa, Kalè Akté, Herbita, la cui ricchezza derivava dalla grande disponibilità di risorse naturali e dai commerci diretti o indiretti svolti con il resto dell’Isola e con la Penisola Italiana, ma anche con altre aree del Mediterraneo, soprattutto per quelli che si affacciavano sul mare. La nascita di molti di questi insediamenti risale di frequente alla preistoria e l’esistenza di alcuni di essi si è prolungata fino ad oggi. Le caratteristiche fisiche di questa parte montagnosa della Sicilia determinarono peculiari forme di occupazione e lo sviluppo di una cultura autonoma, anche a causa della sua perifericità rispetto ai principali centri dell’antichità. I Nebrodi sono rimasti a lungo archeologicamente inesplorati: pochi sono stati i saggi di scavo, concentrati principalmente su alcuni siti (soprattutto Tyndaris e Halaesa). Pertanto la storia di queste contrade è rimasta a lungo quasi sconosciuta. L’autore ha svolto ricerche finalizzate alla conoscenza di molti aspetti inediti di questa parte dell’isola: l’incontro tra cultura indigena e cultura greca, la loro coesistenza, i modi d’insediamento e la forma delle città, i commerci anche ad ampio raggio, le produzioni locali. La ricerca ha tenuto c
NEW: The Ovoid Amphorae in the Central and Western Mediterranean Between the last two centuries of the Republic and the early days of the Roman Empire edited by Enrique García Vargas, Rui Roberto de Almeida, Horacio González Cesteros and Antonio Sáez Romero. Paperback; 210x297mm; xii+414 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (65 pages in colour). 572 2019 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 13. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692969. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692976. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The production of amphorae and the export of commodities transported in them was a key activity for the Mediterranean world in Antiquity. Consequently, their study is of enormous value for analysing the agricultural and fishing economy, and also the commercial mechanism of that period. Through the typological and chronological analysis of these ceramic containers, a high degree of knowledge has been achieved, especially for the production of the different Mediterranean societies from the second millennium BC to the Middle Ages.

In The Ovoid Amphorae in the Central and Western Mediterranean between the last two centuries of the Republic and the early days of the Roman Empire, several series of amphorae created in the Late Republican Roman period (2nd and 1st centuries BC) have been studied – a group of material until now little studied. All of these groups of containers share a common feature in the shape of their bodies which is generally ovoid. The fact that they were conceived and developed in the economic and political context in which Rome expanded throughout the Mediterranean, transferring to its new territories its production and commercialization procedures, bears witness to the almost total integration of the Mediterranean markets.

This publication is based on the proceedings of the workshop held at Seville University in December 2015. The book brings together contributions on the main production areas of these ovoid amphorae from the Atlantic to the Greek mainland / North Peloponnese, analysing in detail the origins, evolution and disappearance of their main series. It also includes case studies that are particularly relevant in relation to their distribution, consumption patterns, contents and relationship with other groups of amphorae manufactured in the Roman Imperial era. The aim of this publication has been to present an updated and complete synthesis of the so-called ovoid amphorae, from an interdisciplinary, international and diachronic standpoint.

About the Editors
Enrique García Vargas (PhD History, University of Seville) is Lecturer at the University of Seville. Currently, he co-leads the Tomares Treasure Project, on a huge coin hoard buried near Seville during the first decades of the 4th century AD.

Rui Roberto de Almeida holds a Master’s degree in Archaeology and is currently developing his PhD research and thesis on maritime food trade from the Guadalquivir valley to Lusitania during the Roman era (I century BC - VI AD)’.

Horacio González Cesteros (PhD Archaeology, University of Tarragona and the Catalan Archaeological Institute) is a member of the research staff of the Austrian Archaeological Institute.

Antonio Sáez Romero (PhD Archaeology, University of Cadiz) is Assistant Professor at the University of Seville (Spain) and has been part or directed several research projects in Gibraltar, Portugal, Morocco, Italy and Greece.
NEW: Maritime-Related Cults in the Coastal Cities of Philistia during the Roman Period Legacy and Change by Simona Rodan. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+212 pages; 40 figures (26 pages in colour). 571 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 60. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692563. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692570. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Maritime-Related Cults in the Coastal Cities of Philistia during the Roman Period questions the origins and the traditions of the cultic rites practised during Roman times along the southern shores of the Land of Israel. This area was known since biblical times as ‘Peleshet’ (Philistia), after the name of one of the Sea Peoples that had settled there at the beginning of the Iron Age. Philistia’s important cities Jaffa, Ashkelon, Gaza and Rafiah were culturally and religiously integrated into the Graeco-Roman world. At the same time, each city developed its own original and unique group of myths and cults that had their roots in earlier periods. Their emergence and formation were influenced by environmental conditions as well as by ethno-social structures and political circumstances. Philistia’s port cities served as crossroads for the routes connecting the main centres of culture and commerce in ancient times. Most of their cults were closely associated with the sea, and reflect the existential dependency of the inhabitants on the sea that supplied them with sustenance and livelihood and was regarded as a divine beneficent power. The myths also echo the lives of the sailors, their beliefs and fears derived from encountering the dangers of the sea: storms, floods, reefs and giant fish portrayed as monsters. The population of the cities was of mixed and varied ethnic and cultural origins. This was the result of the waves of conquests and migrations over the ages, yet each city was noted for its unique ethnic components. The book also deals with the political circumstances, which had a decisive impact on the formation of religious life and cultic rites in all four cities. It sheds new light to the understanding of the events and historical processes in the region.

About the Author
Simona Rodan is a historian whose field of research are the beliefs, customs and cultic practices in the ancient Mediterranean world, and their reflection in literature and art from the ancient period to the modern times. She holds a PhD in Maritime Civilizations from the University of Haifa. Rodan is the author of The Goddess of Luck, the City and the Sea: The Cult of Tyche and Fortuna in the Coastal Cities of Eretz Israel (2014) (in Hebrew) and Aegean Mercenaries in Light of the Bible: Clash of Cultures in the Story of David and Goliath (2015).
NEW: Experimental Archaeology: Making, Understanding, Story-telling Proceedings of a Workshop in Experimental Archaeology: Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens with UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture, Dublin (Athens, 14th-15th October 2017) edited by Christina Souyoudzoglou-Haywood and Aidan O'Sullivan. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+106 pages; 96 figures, 1 table (59 pages in colour). (Print RRP £28.00). 570 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693195. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693201. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Experimental Archaeology: Making, Understanding, Story-telling is based on the proceedings of a two-day workshop on experimental archaeology at the Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens in 2017, in collaboration with UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture. Scholars, artists and craftspeople explore how people in the past made things, used and discarded them, from prehistory to the Middle Ages. The papers include discussions of the experimental archaeological reconstruction and likely past experience of medieval houses, and also about how people cast medieval bronze brooches, or sharpened Bronze Age swords, made gold ornaments, or produced fresco wall paintings using their knowledge, skills and practices. The production of ceramics is explored through a description of the links between Neolithic pottery and textiles, through the building and testing of a Bronze Age Cretan pottery kiln, and through the replication and experience of Minoan figurines. The papers in this volume show that experimental archaeology can be about making, understanding, and storytelling about the past, in the present.

Aidan O’Sullivan is a Professor of Archaeology at University College Dublin, Ireland. He is Director of the UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture and established the School of Archaeology’s MSc in Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture in 2016. His research interests focus on early medieval Ireland, AD 400-1100, in its northwest European context; Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture studies; and Wetland Archaeology and Environments globally. He is the author and co-author of 13 books, including Early Medieval Ireland, AD 400-1100. The evidence from archaeological excavations (Royal Irish Academy, 2013) and co-edited The Oxford Handbook of Wetland Archaeology (Oxford University Press, 2012).

Christina Souyoudzoglou-Haywood is Director of the Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens (IIHSA) and Adjunct Lecturer in the School of Classics, University College Dublin. Her main research area is the Late Bronze Age of Greece, particularly the western periphery of the Mycenaean world, focusing on the Ionian island of Kephalonia, where she has been conducting a diachronic fieldwalking survey since 2003. For many years Curator of the Classical Museum, UCD, she has published on its history and contents as well as on Greek and Cypriot antiquities in other Irish museum and university collections.
NEW: Historic Landscapes and Mental Well-being edited by Timothy Darvill, Kerry Barrass, Laura Drysdale, Vanessa Heaslip and Yvette Staelens. Paperback; xx+282 pages; 70 figures, 7 tables (75 pages in colour). 569 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692686. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692693. Book contents pageDownload

Using archaeological sites and historic landscapes to promote mental health well-being represents one of the most significant advances in archaeological resource management for many years. Its potential contribution to health-care and wellness initiatives is boundless. Prompted by the Human Henge project working within the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site, this volume provides an overview of work going on across Britain and the near Continent at many different scales. Contributors share experiences, and discuss the outcomes, implications, and theoretical underpinnings of heritage-based well-being projects.

About the Editors
Timothy Darvill is Head of the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bournemouth University and leads the research on the Human Henge project; Kerry Barrass is a researcher on the project; Laura Drysdale is the Director of the Restoration Trust and project manager of Human Henge; Vanessa Heaslip is a Principal Academic in the Department of Nursing and Social Sciences at Bournemouth University and leads the participant monitoring programme on Human Henge; and Yvette Staelens is a visiting research fellow at Bournemouth University and was the programme facilitator for Human Henge.
NEW: La parure en callaïs du Néolithique européen edited by Guirec Querré, Serge Cassen and Emmanuelle Vigier; preface by Yves Coppens. Hardback; 203x276mm; viii+634 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. Papers in French and English. (Print RRP £130.00). 568 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692808. £130.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692815. Book contents pageDownload

Callaïs refers to the green stones from which the remarkable ornaments discovered in several Neolithic sites in Western Europe are made. A term used at the beginning of our era by Pliny the Elder and taken up by the first archaeologists of the early 20th century during the first excavations of the large tumuli of the Carnac region (Morbihan), callaïs includes several mineral species, especially variscite and turquoise, both hydrated aluminium phosphates with a green to blue colour. Beads and pendants made of this precious material, combined with other objects such as axes made of alpine jade, fibrolite, amber or jet beads, sometimes from very distant sources, were deposited with the deceased, reflecting their high rank among the first agropastoral societies, or «sacrificed» in the form of deposits. The question of the nature and origin of these Callaïs pearls and pendants has been discussed many times during the last century by mineralogists and prehistorians. Since the first discoveries on this gem, many researches have been carried out both in the field and in the laboratory to elucidate what some had called ‘the mysteries of the callaïs’.

This volume, prefaced by Yves Coppens, Honorary Professor of the Collège de France, brings together the contributions of the best European specialists in callaïs, variscite and turquoise, who spoke at a symposium on this ancient gemstone held in April 2015 in Carnac. The objective of this book is to disclose the results of the latest research relating to these jewels by scanning multiple fields: variscite geology, gemmology, Neolithic but also Roman exploitations, chemical characterization, production of objects and their diffusion, inventory, dating, place of these jewels within agropastoral societies that occupied part of Europe from the 5th to the 3rd millennium.

French Description:
La callaïs désigne les pierres vertes dont sont faites les remarquables parures découvertes dans plusieurs sites néolithiques d’Europe occidentale. Terme utilisé au début de notre ère par Pline l’Ancien et repris par les premiers archéologues du début du XXème siècle lors des premières fouilles des grands tumulus de la région de Carnac (Morbihan), la callaïs regroupe plusieurs espèces minérales, surtout la variscite et la turquoise, tous deux des phosphates d’aluminium hydratés de couleur verte à bleue. Les perles et pendeloques en cette matière précieuse, associées à d’autres objets tels que haches en jade alpin, en fibrolite, perles en ambre ou en jais, provenant de sources parfois très éloignées, étaient déposés auprès des défunts, témoignant de leur haut rang au sein des premières sociétés agropastorales, ou « sacrifiées » sous forme de dépôts. La question de la nature et de l’origine de ces perles et pendeloques en callaïs a été maintes fois abordée durant le siècle dernier par les minéralogistes et les préhistoriens. Depuis les premières découvertes sur cette gemme, de nombreuses recherches ont été menées tant sur le terrain qu’en laboratoire afin d’élucider ce que certains avaient baptisé « les mystères de la callaïs ».

Ce volume, préfacé par Yves Coppens, Professeur honoraire du Collège de France, regroupe les contributions des meilleurs spécialistes européens de la callaïs, variscite et turquoise, qui sont intervenus lors d’un colloque consacré à cette gemme ancienne qui s’est tenu en avril 2015 à Carnac. L’objectif de cet ouvrage est de divulguer le fruit des dernières recherches relatives à ces bijoux en balayant de multiples domaines : géologie de la variscite, gemmologie, exploitations néolithiques mais aussi romaines, caractérisation chimique, production des objets et leur diffusion, inventaire, datation, place de ces bijoux au sein de sociétés agropastorales qui occupaient une partie de l’Europe du 5ème au 3ème millénaire.
NEW: New Global Perspectives on Archaeological Prospection 13th International Conference on Archaeological Prospection, 28 August – 1 September 2019, Sligo – Ireland edited by James Bonsall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 366 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 567 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693065. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693072. Book contents pageDownload

This volume is a product of the 13th International Conference on Archaeological Prospection 2019, which was hosted by the Department of Environmental Science in the Faculty of Science at the Institute of Technology Sligo. The conference is held every two years under the banner of the International Society for Archaeological Prospection and this was the first time that the conference was held in Ireland. New Global Perspectives on Archaeological Prospection draws together over 90 papers addressing archaeological prospection techniques, methodologies and case studies from 33 countries across Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe and North America, reflecting current and global trends in archaeological prospection. At this particular ICAP meeting, specific consideration was given to the development and use of archaeological prospection in Ireland, archaeological feedback for the prospector, applications of prospection technology in the urban environment and the use of legacy data.

Papers include novel research areas such as magnetometry near the equator, drone-mounted radar, microgravity assessment of tombs, marine electrical resistivity tomography, convolutional neural networks, data processing, automated interpretive workflows and modelling as well as recent improvements in remote sensing, multispectral imaging and visualisation.

About the Editor
James Bonsall uses geophysical and remote sensing technology to investigate ancient people and landscapes. James is particularly interested in challenging upland and coastal environments that require technical expertise combined with novel methodological approaches to enhance the interpretation of past environments. James has twenty years of archaeological geophysical experience acquired in the commercial and academic sectors. His PhD, a fellowship from the National Roads Authority, focused on aspects of prospecting driven by legacy data collected during the ‘Celtic Tiger’ economic boom. James is a Lecturer in Archaeology at the Institute of Technology Sligo. His recent publications include a geoarchaeological study of shell middens on the west coast of Ireland; mapping pauper burials in the UK; and the challenges of surveying remote upland sites in Ireland and Italy.
NEW: The Archaeology of Medieval Villages Currently Inhabited in Europe edited by Jesús Fernández Fernández and Margarita Fernández Mier. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+120 pages; 40 figures, 7 tables (19 colour pages). (Print RRP £30.00). 566 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693003. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693010. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The study of deserted villages abandoned during the last millennium in Europe has been the primary focus of archaeological interventions in rural settlements over recent decades. However, most of the hamlets and villages of medieval origin remain inhabited today and excavations in these small and medium-sized settlements are more unusual. The Archaeology of Medieval Villages Currently Inhabited in Europe focuses on these locations, giving examples of sites excavated in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, France, Scandinavia and Spain. The case studies highlight the diversity of problems and debates around this subject such as the meaning of the term ‘village’, the chronology beyond the last millennium with continuities, discontinuities and ruptures, the integration of research into residential and working areas, the role of local communities in research programmes and the need for multidisciplinary approaches to address all these issues. Deserted villages research along with currently-inhabited settlement excavation has the important potential to achieve long-lasting historical syntheses on medieval settlement networks in Europe. These five chapters offer challenging approaches to the above issues and proposals for future research in the field from Spain to the North Sea.

About the Editors
Jesús Fernández Fernández’s lines of research and interests focus on Medieval Archaeology, Historical Archaeology, Landscape Archaeology, GIS and Heritage studies. His recent research interests and publications focus on the landscape and settlement transformations in the Asturian area, particularly in the early medieval period. Jesús has been the director of several archaeological fieldwork projects and a member of research projects in various universities. Currently he is co-director with Gabriel Moshenska and Margarita Fernández Mier of the Villanueva de Santu Adrianu medieval settlement excavation project. Currently he is teaching and researching at Oviedo University within the programme Marie-Curie COFUND. Fernández is also a social entrepreneur and director of La Ponte-Ecomuseum, an archaeological-museological community project in Asturias, founded in 2012 and an award winner in 2016 (Leading Culture Destination Awards) and 2019 (Hispania Nostra Awards for Good Practices in Cultural Heritage).

Margarita Fernández Mier is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Oviedo (Spain). Her principal interest is the study of early medieval societies in the north-western Iberian Peninsula, as well as the settlement analysis and the organisation of agrarian landscapes research. Margarita’s work is based on written and archaeological records and a long term analysis, from Roman times to Middle Ages. She is PI of the ‘Local spaces and social complexity: the medieval roots of a twentieth-century debate (ELCOS)’ project: a interdisciplinary research group funded by the Spanish Government which aims to situate the present-day rural communities of Southern Europe as inheritors of a centuries-long experience of collective organisation from medieval times. Margarita is the lead investigator of the LLABOR research group working on Agrarian and Public Archaeology in Spain and Latin America.
NEW: Listening to the Stones: Essays on Architecture and Function in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries in Honour of Richard Alan Tomlinson edited by Elena C. Partida and Barbara Schmidt-Dounas. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+264 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 pages in colour). 565 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690873. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690880. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Listening to the Stones: Essays on Architecture and Function in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries in Honour of Richard Alan Tomlinson deals with a range of topics that relate to the broad scope of Richard Tomlinson’s archaeological quests and echoes his own methodology in research. Innovative masonry modes, matters of style and orders, proportions and design principles, as well as the inter-regional connections which fostered the transmission of architectural traditions and technical know-how have been cardinal points in Tomlinson’s writings and lectures, as much as the Greek foundations on foreign soil, the forethought in planning, achievements in the field of engineering and the interaction between the secular, the sepulchral and the sacred premises in an ancient city. The conservative or progressive attitudes of a society usually leave an imprint on architectural creations. So, architecture is subject to evolution along with the developing societies. Its gradual changing signifies the building programs taken up by ancient communities. Within this frame, we better comprehend the function of public edifices, the remodeling of cult sites in accordance with historic circumstances, the role of politics in architecture. This book is a token of appreciation of a British professor of archaeology, who spread knowledge of the Greek civilization, manifesting the brilliant spirit of the versatile ancient Greek builders.

About the Editors
Elena C. Partida is research archaeologist at the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports, and adjunct professor at the University of Patras. She holds MA and PhD from the University of Birmingham. Trained by the Academic Staff Development Unit in ‘Teaching, assessing students and presentation skills’, she lectured on Classical archaeology at Birmingham University, as assistant to the head of the Department, Prof. R.A. Tomlinson. Elena attended seminars on Roman architecture at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts and the course ‘Interventions to monuments and historic settlements’ organised by the European Centre for the Precaution and Prognosis of Earthquakes. On the Acropolis of Athens E.P. was responsible for the documentation of architectural disiecta membra within the European project ‘Network of archaeological sites in Athens’. Appointed Curator of Antiquities at Delphi, E.P. carried out a study on the Delphi Museum Re-Exhibition (awarded with the Best Practices distinction), in parallel to studies on the restoration and consolidation of ancient monuments at Delphi; she also designed the installation of open-air exhibitions. As a curator of Patras Archaeological Museum, E.P. is in charge of interdisciplinary international collaborative projects involving cultural patrimony, new finds and new technologies.

Barbara Schmidt-Dounas studied classical archaeology, ancient history and prehistory at the Universities Johann Wolfgang von Goethe at Frankfurt/Main and Georg August at Göttingen in Germany. She was a scientific collaborator at the University Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in Frankfurt/Main – Germany within the project ‘Donations offered by Hellenistic Kings to Greek Cities and Sanctuaries’ which was funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) (1984-1986). Barbara was a lecturer and later an assistant and Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; in 2006 shewas appointed Professor of Classical Archaeology at the same University. Barbara is a member of the founding board of the Interdisciplinary Centre of Archaeological Studies ‘Manolis Andronikos’ (ΔΙ.ΚΕ.ΑΜ.) and a director of the Cast Museum of the Department of Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Barbara is also a corresponding member of the German Archaeological Institute.
NEW: Geophysical Phenomena and the Alexandrian Littoral by N. Evelpidou, C. Repapis, C. Zerefos, H. Tzalas and C. Synolakis. Hardback; 175x245mm; x+132 pages; 51 figures, 2 tables (51 pages in colour). 561 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692341. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692358. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Alexandria is located on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, bordered by Egypt’s Western Desert and the fertile Nile Delta. For many centuries, Alexandria was the major port city in the Eastern Mediterranean and it has been repeatedly struck by natural disasters, such as earthquakes, tsunamis and land subsidence, in its ~2400-year history. This book focuses on the geomorphological and archaeological evidence on the coastal zone of Alexandria, attempting to provide a comprehensive review of its evolution, taking into consideration long-term and short-term factors.

The book provides an extensive background on the geomorphology and recent geoarchaeological history of Alexandria, discussing historical maps and natural disasters. In the coastal area of Alexandria there is numerous archaeological evidence, such as burial sites, quarry activities and ancient building remnants, as well as geomorphological features, all revealing a complex evolution of the coastal zone. New evidence, such as fish tanks and ship wrecks in order to discuss the Late Holocene evolution of the coastal zone. Detailed illustrations and maps accompany the book chapters providing the reader the opportunity to gain an extensive view of Alexandria’s features.

About the Authors
Niki Evelpidou is a Professor of Geomorphology and Geoinformatics at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, and Faculty Affiliate of the Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences of the College of Charleston, USA. Prof. Evelpidou is actively involved in the research fields of geomorphology, coastal geomorphology, sea level changes, palaeogeography, geology, spatial technologies, study and modelling of natural hazards, while emphasizing on the use of new technologies and innovation.

Christos Repapis was Director of the Research Centre of Atmospheric Physics and Climatology of the Academy of Athens (1985-2005) and has remained as Research Associate of the Centre since his retirement.

Christos Zerefos heads the Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens and is president-elect of the General Assembly of the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation. Other roles academic posts include Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Physics (Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki), Visiting Professor (Universities of Minnesota and Boston) and Samarbeidspartnere (University of Oslo).

Harry Tzalas has conducted a range of innovative experimental archaeological studies relating to ancient sea vessels. In 1997 he formed the Hellenic Institute of Ancient and Mediaeval Alexandrian Studies and obtained a concession from the Egyptian Authorities for an underwater survey of 14 kilometers of the eastern littoral of Alexandria; 28 campaigns were successfully conducted.

Costas Synolakis is Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Southern California and a a member of the Academy of Athens holding the Chair of Earth Sciences. His research studies the impact of natural hazards, and particularly tsunamis and extreme flooding events on beaches. He has participated or led 30 scientific expeditions in 21 countries, practically in all of the world’s oceans and seas.
NEW: The Buckley Potteries: Recent Research and Excavation by Nigel Jones. Paperback; x+122 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 551 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692228. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692235. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Peter Davey, Leigh Dodd, Richard Hankinson, Bob Silvester and Sophie Watson.

The small town of Buckley, in Flintshire, has been the focus for a regional pottery industry for at least 600 years, from the medieval period to the mid-20th century. However, despite Buckley’s impressive industrial past, a visit to the town today reveals little evidence to suggest the extent and importance of what was once a major industry supplying traditional earthenware.

This book is based on the results of recent research and excavation which has enhanced our understanding of the Buckley potteries, identifying over 30 individual production sites from documentary and cartographic sources. It considers the factors that influenced the siting and development of the industry, how it changed through time and the reasons for its eventual demise.

Few of the potteries have been the subject of archaeological excavation, and of those none have previously been published in detail. The book presents the results from excavations on the sites of four potteries, and includes a review of the evidence for others, including a gazetteer detailing the evidence for all of the potteries currently known.

About the Author
NIGEL JONES is the Principal Archaeologist at the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust, where he has worked since the early 1980s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of archaeological sites from the Neolithic to industrial, the more significant of which have been published in regional and national journals. His career has focused principally on field archaeology, including numerous excavations, surveys of earthwork monuments and wider landscapes, building surveys and aerial photography. He is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.

Table of Contents
Introduction; Geology of the Buckley Area - By Richard Hankinson; Buckley Potteries and their relationship with Buckley Mountain Common – cartographic evidence - By Bob Silvester; History and Significance of the Buckley Potteries - By Peter Davey; Brookhill Pottery (Site 1), 2016 - By Richard Hankinson; Taylor’s Pottery (Site 3), 2005 - By Leigh Dodd; Lewis’s Pottery (Site 5), 2000 - By Leigh Dodd; Price’s Pottery (Site 11), 2014-15 - By Sophie Watson; A Gazetteer of Buckley Potteries; Bibliography
NEW: The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual by Glennise West. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 362 figures (colour and black & white), 1 table. 539 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 23. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691825. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691832. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

What is the Tekenu? What was its function? What are its origins? These are questions upon which Egyptologists have long pondered. However, Egyptologists, until now, have avoided any major work on the topic. Previous treatments of the Tekenu largely adopt a selective approach focusing on a specific form. Rarely has the Tekenu been examined profoundly in all of its forms or contexts with its possible origins commented upon merely in passing. The aim of The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual is to provide a provocative examination and interpretation of the Tekenu in an endeavour to proffer plausible answers hitherto eluding scholars. Attested from the Fifth Dynasty until, and including the Saite Period, the Tekenu is a puzzling icon which is depicted within the funerary scenes in the tombs of some ancient Egyptian nobles. In this work four distinct types of Tekenu are identified and classified and then a Corpus Catalogue is formed. The Tekenu is appraised within the context of the wall scene. Two tombs are dealt with in greater detail.

About the Author
Glennise West graduated from the University of Sydney and taught English and History at secondary school level. Later she followed her lifelong interest in ancient Egypt obtaining MA and PhD from Macquarie University, Sydney. The topic of this book was the subject of her PhD dissertation. She lives in Sydney.
NEW: Conflict Landscapes: An Archaeology of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War by Salvatore Garfi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 530 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691344. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691351. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is an archaeological exploration of a conflict landscape encountered by the volunteers of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War of 1936-39. A great deal is known about the Brigades in terms of inter-world war geopolitics, their history and make-up, but less is known about the materiality of the landscapes in which they lived, fought, and died.

The Spanish Civil War was a relatively static conflict. As in the First World War, it consisted of entrenched Republican government lines facing similarly entrenched Nationalist (rebel) lines, and these ran north to south across Spain. Fighting was intermittent, so the front line soldiers had to settle in, and make what was an attritional war-scape, a place to live in and survive. This research examines one such war-scape as a place of ‘settlement’, where soldiers lived their daily lives as well as confronting the rigours of war – and these were the volunteers of the International Brigades, both foreign and Spanish, who occupied a section of lines southeast of Zaragoza in Aragón in 1937 and 1938.

This research draws, not only on the techniques of landscape archaeology, but also on the writings of international volunteers in Spain – in particular, George Orwell – and it incorporates historical photography as a uniquely analytical, archaeological resource.

About the Author
Salvatore Garfi has been a professional archaeologist since 1974, working on a range of projects from the prehistoric to the contemporary. Besides working in Britain, he has worked in Egypt, Southern Arabia, and elsewhere in the Middle East. Since 2010, he has specialised in the archaeology of modern conflict, and his doctoral research was on the late 20th Century conflict in Western Sahara. He was a post-doctoral Leverhulme Fellow in the School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, University of Nottingham (2015-2018), and co-founder of the International Brigades Archaeological Project (IBAP), which ran from 2014 to 2015.
NEW: Country in the City: Agricultural Functions of Protohistoric Urban Settlements (Aegean and Western Mediterranean) edited by Dominique Garcia, Raphaël Orgeolet, Maia Pomadère and Julian Zurbach. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+200; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (32 plates in colour). 518 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691320. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691337. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The validity of an opposition between rural and urban spaces is an important question for our societies; this question has been raised since the radical transformations of the 20th century and the so-called ‘end of the peasants’. In this context it becomes also a question for archaeologists and historians. Country in the City: Agricultural Functions in Protohistoric Urban Settlements (Aegean and Western Mediterranean) assembles contributions on the place of agricultural production in the context of urbanization in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Mediterranean. The contributions concentrate on the second millennium Aegean and the protohistoric northwestern Mediterranean. They offer a reflection on the nature of urbanization and its consequences for rural spaces near cities and on the many ways in which rural spaces and agricultural activities may be intertwined with urban spaces – a reconsideration of the very nature of urbanism. A deliberate accent is laid on the comparative perspectives between different regions and periods of Mediterranean protohistory, and on the integration of all kinds of sources and research methods, from texts to survey to environmental archaeology. Highlighted throughout are the original paths followed in the Peloponnese or in the Troad with regard to the Minoan model of urbanization, and the many aspects of Minoan urbanization, and many regional differences in Languedoc vis-à-vis Catalonia. Thus a new perspective on Mediterranean urbanization is offered.

About the Editors
Dominique Garcia is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Aix-Marseille and, since 2014, has been president of the lnstitut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research).

Raphaël Orgeolet is Senior Lecturer in Mediterranean Bronze Age Archaeology at Aix-Marseille University. His main research interests focus on settlement, funeral practices and society. He has taken part in various archaeological projects in the Mediterranean and especially in the Aegean and is now leading the excavations of the Neolithic and Bronze Age site of Kirrha in Mainland Greece.

Maia Pomadère is a Senior Lecturer in Aegean Archaeology at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon Sorbonne and member of the UMR 7041-ArScAn. Her research interests encompass Aegean Bronze Age and Early Iron Age archaeology, especially architecture and funerary practices. She has been directing an archaeological excavation in the Minoan town of Malia in Crete since 2005, and is codirecting a geoarchaeological project on the same site.

Julien Zurbach is Senior Lecturer in Greek history at the ENS Paris. He is working on agricultural practices, land distribution and workforce in the Aegean world from the Late Bronze Age to the Archaic period. He concentrates particularly on Mycenaean epigraphy and has led field projects in Kirrha (Phocis) and Miletus (Ionia).
FORTHCOMING: Scambi e commerci in area vesuviana I dati delle anfore dai saggi stratigrafici I.E. (Impianto Elettrico) 1980-81 nel Foro di Pompei edited by Darío Bernal-Casasola and Daniela Cottica. Paperback; 210x297mm; x+344 pages; 79 figures, 71 plates (90 pages in colour). (Print RRP £55.00). 590 2019 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 14. ISBN 9781789693232. Book contents pageBuy Now

Transport amphorae are one of the best archaeological indicators for evaluating the economy and trade of societies in the ancient world. Scambi e commerci in area vesuviana: i dati delle anfore dai saggi stratigrafici I.E. (Impianto Elettrico) 1980-81 nel Foro di Pompei, produced by researchers from the University of Cadiz and the Ca' Foscari University of Venice, includes the study of nearly five hundred of these commercial containers, recovered during the pioneering stratigraphic excavations carried out in 1980-1981 at the Forum of Pompeii, called conventionally "Impianto Elettrico".

The work represents the first Pompeian monograph dedicated exclusively to the analysis of the amphoric evidence brought to light by archaeological excavation activities in the city buried by the eruption of Vesuvius and analyses in diachronic perspective the main productions in circulation between the VI / V BC and the year 79 AD. The chapters of the volume offer the reader data relating to archaic amphorae, Greek amphorae and Italic wine amphorae from the Republican era, which draw a commercial panorama of great vitality. The African amphorae, following Punic traditions, are then reviewed; then follow the Punic-Gaditan garum amphorae, identified for the first time in the Vesuvian area in this study; le Dressel 21-22, containers for the Italic fish-salting trade and, finally, the productions of the late Republican and Julio-Claudian period. The volume is completed by a series of complementary archaeometric studies carried out on some of the amphorae (paleocontent organic residue analysis and petrographic characterization of the fabrics).

All this material, analyzed with an integrated and interdisciplinary approach, allows us to draw multiple conclusions, fundamental to understanding the rich and articulated daily history of Pompeii, its merchants and its inhabitants (the consumers to whom the amphorae were intended) but also useful to better define the Economic History of some of the circum-Mediterranean regions (from Gades to the Aegean) with which Pompeii had strong trade ties in Antiquity, as evidenced by the amphorae presented here.

About the Editors
Darío Bernal-Casasola is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cádiz.

Daniela Cottica is currently Senior Lecturer in Classical Archeology at the Ca 'Foscari University of Venice.

Italian Description:
Scambi e commerci in area vesuviana: i dati delle anfore dai saggi stratigrafici I.E. (Impianto Elettrico) 1980-81 nel Foro di Pompei rappresenta la prima monografia pompeiana dedicata esclusivamente all’analisi delle testimonianze anforiche portate alla luce da attività di scavo archeologico nella città sepolta dall’eruzione del Vesuvio, ed analizza in prospettiva diacronica tutte le produzioni in circolazione tra il VI/V secolo a.C. e l’anno 79 d.C. I quattordici capitoli del volume offrono al lettore i dati relativi alle anfore arcaiche, non abbondanti ma molto significative per le fasi più antiche dell’insediamento, e alle anfore greche, specialmente rodie di epoca ellenistica, che si distinguono per l’abbondanza di esemplari bollati. Sono poi presentate le anfore vinarie italiche di epoca repubblicana, che disegnano un panorama commerciale di grande vitalità, nel quale la Campania gioca un ruolo preminente, intrecciando le sue produzioni con quelle di altre aree della penisola. Si passano quindi in rassegna le anfore africane, o di tradizione punica, caratterizzate da una complessa seriazione tipologica che ben illustra gli intensi rapporti commerciali con il nordafrica e l’isola di Ibiza; seguono poi le anfore punico-gaditane da garum, identificate per la prima volta in area vesuviana proprio in questo studio, e le Dressel 21-22, contenitori per il commercio italico di salagione di recente caratterizzazione e, infine, le produzioni del periodo tardo-repubblicano e g
FORTHCOMING: Egypt in Croatia: Croatian Fascination with Ancient Egypt from Antiquity to Modern Times edited by Mladen Tomorad. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 369 illustrations in colour and black & white (Print RRP: £50.00). 585 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 24. ISBN 9781789693393. Book contents pageBuy Now

At first sight, it seems that ancient Egyptian history and culture have no meaningful ties with present-day Croatia. However, when we scratch beneath the surface of the common idea of Egypt, that of a distant and ancient civilisation, we notice that its elements have been present in Croatia ever since antiquity. Egypt in Croatia provides a closer look at many aspects of the presence and fascination of ancient Egyptian culture in Croatia, from antiquity to the present. The topics explored are the artefacts discovered in present-day Croatia (mostly from the early 19th century), Croatian travellers to Egypt from the 16th to the middle of the 20th century, Egyptian collections in Croatia and early collectors from the 1820s until the 1950s, an overview of the development of Egyptology of study within Croatia as well as the various elements of ‘Egyptomania’ found in Croatia, mostly from the beginning of the 19th century.

About the Editor
Mladen Tomorad is a senior researcher and professor of Ancient History at the Department of History, University of Zagreb. He has a masters degree in History and a PhD in Ancient History and Museology, and he has also studied Egyptology at the University of Manchester.
FORTHCOMING: Bridge of Civilizations: The Near East and Europe c. 1100–1300 edited by Peter Edbury, Denys Pringle and Balázs Major. Hardback; 176x250mm; xx+344 pages; 171 figures, 10 maps. (Print RRP £65.00). 576 2019. ISBN 9781789693270. Buy Now

This volume brings together 23 of the papers presented at a conference held in Esztergom, Hungary, in May 2018 to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the crusade of King Andrew II of Hungary to the Holy Land in 1217–18. The theme, Bridge of Civilizations, was chosen to highlight aspects of the links and contrasts between Europe and the areas around the eastern Mediterranean that were visited and occupied by western crusaders and settlers in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, giving special attention to the evidence provided by archaeology and material culture, as well as historical sources.

The results of the joint Syrian-Hungarian Archaeological Mission (SHAM) to the Hospitaller castle of Margat (al-Marqab) highlighted in this volume include an up-to-date overview of the structural development of the site from 1187 to 1285, as well as particular studies of the wall paintings, cooking installations and pottery. SHAM’s recent rescue work at Crac des Chevaliers also provides the basis for studies of the water-management system and medieval burials revealed in its courtyard, while other papers examine the masonry marks and surviving evidence of medieval trebuchet damage at both castles. Other papers focus on the medieval castles of Karak (Jordan) and Jubayl (Lebanon), the medieval buildings of Latakia (Syria), the impact of the Crusades on buildings in Cairo, historic bridges in Lebanon, the medieval chapels of Yanouh-Mghayreh and Edde-Jbeil (Lebanon), piscinas in Crusader churches in the East, the images of donors found in medieval Lebanese churches, and the activity of late thirteenth-century Western metalworkers in Cyprus.

Papers focusing more particularly on historical sources include a new edition of a late eleventh- to twelfth century pilgrimage itinerary from Hungary to the Holy Land, a discussion of two minor military orders in Hungary, a reassessment of the conceptualization of Holy War in the run-up to the First Crusade, and the portrayal of Sultan al-Kāmil in a contemporary western account of the Fifth Crusade.

About the Editors
Peter Edbury is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. He has published widely on the history and institutions of the kingdoms founded by the crusaders in the Near East and has re-edited the legal treatises by John of Ibelin (2003) and Philip of Novara (2009).

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013).

Balázs Major is an archaeologist, Arabist and historian by training and holds a PhD from Cardiff University. He is the director of the Institute of Archaeology at Pázmány Péter Catholic University and a lecturer in the Department of Arabic Studies.
FORTHCOMING: Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 1000 edited by Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; xxviii+350 pages; 358 figures, 52 tables. 575 2019. ISBN 9781789692983. Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Cristina Mondin, Michele Asolati Louise Bertini, Audrey Eller, Urška Furlan, Ole Herslund, Israel Hinojosa Baliño, Marie-Caroline Livaditis, Giorgia Marchiori, Marcus Müller, Benjamin T. Pennington and Amy Wilson.

In 2012, fieldwork began at two large sites in the Beheira Province in the western Nile Delta: Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit (ancient Metelis). Being close to the important ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta meant that they had been ideally placed to take advantage of the trade between the Mediterranean and Egypt. The sites are being thoroughly investigated to reveal their archaeological significance.

Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt presents the results of the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016. It provides details of the survey and excavation results from different occupation phases. A complete town beneath the Nile silt was revealed using a combination of modern scientific techniques. Hellenistic houses and a temple enclosure wall were investigated at Kom Wasit; while at Kom al-Ahmer, a Late Roman house, an amphora storage building, a cistern and an early Islamic cemetery were revealed.

Dating from the Late Dynastic to the Early Islamic period, the remains found at Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit demonstrate for the first time the rich archaeological heritage of this region.

About the Editor
Mohamed Kenawi is a Researcher and Training Manager at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford, for the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa project. He was Head Researcher (2011–16), followed by Acting Director (2016–17), of the Hellenistic Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria. He taught at the American University in Cairo and at Catania University. He has participated in various archaeological missions in Libya, Italy, and Egypt, among them those at Kom al-Ahmer/Kom Wasit, Athribis, Dionysias, and Manqbad. He currently collaborates on projects with Padua University and Tübingen University. He has published various articles about his research, in addition to his monograph, Alexandria’s Hinterland: Archaeology of the Western Nile Delta, Egypt (2014). He published a co-authored book with G. Marchiori entitled Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: the Italian Contribution (2018). He is Egypt Coordinator for the Manar al-Athar open access photo-archive.
FORTHCOMING: Farmsteads and Funerary Sites: The M1 Junction 12 Improvements and the A5–M1 Link Road, Central Bedfordshire Archaeological investigations prior to construction, 2011 & 2015–16 by Jim Brown. Hardback; 205x290mm; 566pp; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £120.00). 556 2019. ISBN 9781789692600. Buy Now

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook extensive excavations during the construction of two separate, but adjacent road schemes, some 4.5km apart near Houghton Regis and Toddington, in south Central Bedfordshire. Taken as a whole, the excavations provide a detailed multi-period dataset for regional and national comparison.

The first evidence for occupation occurred in the middle/late Bronze Age comprising pits and clusters of postholes, including four-post and six-post structures. Two pit alignments, more than 2km apart, also indicate that land divisions were being established, and in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a significant new settlement emerged in the valley bottom. Parts of a further contemporary earlier-middle Iron Age settlement lay at the top of the valley but neither settlement extended into the Roman period. In the late Iron Age or early Roman period three or four new settlements emerged with occupation continuing into the late Roman period in at least one of these. Of particular interest was the recovery of two significant Aylesford-Swarling type cemeteries as well as a third cemetery which largely comprised unurned burials, including some busta, but with few accompanying grave goods.

In the late 7th-century a small probable Christian conversion open-ground inhumation cemetery was established with burials accompanied by a range of objects, including a rare work box, knives, brooches, chatelaine keys and a spearhead. Parts of three medieval settlements were uncovered including one with a potters' working area.
FORTHCOMING: What Difference Does Time Make? Papers from the Ancient and Islamic Middle East and China in Honor of the 100th Anniversary of the Midwest Branch of the American Oriental Society edited by JoAnn Scurlock and Richard H. Beal. Paperback; 176x250mm; 186pp; 10 figures (Print RRP: £38.00). 589 2019 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 6. ISBN 9781789693171. Buy Now

This volume presents a wide-ranging exploration of Time as experienced and contemplated. Included are offerings on ancient Mesopotamian archaeology, literature and religion, Biblical texts and archaeology, Chinese literature and philosophy, and Islamic law. In addition, the majority of the papers specifically address issues of differences and similarities between cultures, with or without actual cultural contact.

This volume is the publication of a conference designed to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Midwest branch of the American Oriental Society, held at St. Mary’s University in Notre Dame, Indiana, in February 2017.

About the Editors
JoAnn Scurlock, president of the Midwest Branch of the American Oriental Society, received her BA and PhD in Assyriology from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. She is the author of around one hundred articles in scholarly journals on ancient medicine, magic, mythology, religion, and political history.

Richard H. Beal received his BA in the Oriental Studies department at the University of Pennsylvania and his PhD from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago in Hittitology. He has worked for the Chicago Hittite Dictionary Project since its inception in 1976 and is now a senior research associate.
FORTHCOMING: Les pratiques funéraires en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle by András Márton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 556pp; 322 figures, 382 maps (Print RRP: £70.00). 588 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789693355. Buy Now

Les pratiques funéraires en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle aims to give an overview of Roman burial practices in Pannonia during the Early Roman period. Among the different approaches proposed by R. Reece for the study of Roman cemeteries, this work focuses on the grave treatment and grave furnishing. The funerary practices are thus apprehended through the study of tomb structure, the selection and treatment of grave goods and human remains.

The book proposes a synthesis of the published finds to serve as a base for future research. The analysis consists of a documentary review (presented in the catalogue and numerous tables) as complete as possible from the published data, accompanied by a detailed analysis of the information available today to highlight the trends regarding the entire province but also the peculiarities that can be distinguished at the regional level. The analysis is supported by many graphics and maps. Many general trends, common to the western provinces of the Roman Empire, were detected but also many particularities linked to the economic and social situation of the communities, the different components of the population of Pannonia and the political and military history of the province.

About the Author
András Márton was born in Budapest. He holds masters degrees in History, and Archaeology (specializing in Roman provincial and Classical archaeology) from the Eötvös Lorand University, Budapest and a PhD from the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest. He currently lives in France and is involved with research programmes at the Louvre and the Museum of Fine Arts, Lyon. His research interests are pottery studies and ancient funerary practices.
FORTHCOMING: La naissance des cités-royaumes cypriotes by Thierry Petit. Paperback; 175x245mm; 168pp (Print RRP: £30.00). 587 2019. ISBN 9781789693478. Buy Now

Three theories vie to explain the causes, characteristics and chronology behind the emergence of Iron Age Cypriot city-kingdoms: Achaean, Phoenician and autochthonous. Privileged by scholars until as recently as the 1980s, the first linked the emergence of the Cypriot city-state to the great Achaean migrations at the end of the second millennium. Epic foundation myths, telling of cities founded by Achaean heroes returning from Troy, were seen as fabled versions of events unfolding ostensibly at the outset of the Iron Age. The writings of D.W. Rupp cast doubt on the Achaean theory, by placing these developments at a much later date (8th c. BCE) and tracing their origins to the growing influence of the Phoenicians. This hypothesis was hotly contested, giving rise to a third theory, according to which the Cypriot Iron Age was essentially a continuation of the island’s Bronze Age civilisation. The latter theory now holds sway and is scarcely ever contested. The Cypriot city-kingdoms that we observe in the historical period (7th-4th c. BCE) are said to have arisen, after a few decades of instability, as early as the 11th century. Their political and administrative structures would have undergone little more than consolidation in the 8th century, before enjoying their floruit during the Archaic and Classical periods and finally disappearing amid the Wars of the Diadochi at the start of the Hellenistic period.

By recasting these developments within the broader context of the re-emergence of state structures in the eastern Mediterranean, La naissance des cités-royaumes cypriotes reassesses the arguments advanced by champions of the received theory. It likewise situates the phenomenon within a firmer theoretical (i.e. anthropological) framework, intended to establish well-defined distinctions. Furthermore, it proposes a shared typology that can accommodate other political entities, traces of which are found throughout the Geometric period (11th-8th c. BCE). Not only does the archaeological evidence compel us to question whether events unfolded as suggested, it reinforces a more nuanced variant of the Phoenician theory. Various state markers, though abundant in the 8th century (Cypro-Geometric III), seem indeed conspicuously absent during Cypro-Geometric I and II. Excavations at one such city-state, the palace of Amathus, have yielded compelling indications as to when a lasting dynasty originally arose. From them, we can surmise that the Kingdom of Amathus was the first of its kind. While the process no doubt took several decades, under no circumstances did it occur before the 9th century BCE. This coincides, moreover, with the wave of resurgent state-building that swept the eastern Mediterranean and engulfed even more westerly regions like the Aegean.

À propos de l'origine des cités-royaumes cypriotes connues aux époques archaïque et classique (VIIe-IVe s. av.), trois théories s'affrontent, que l'on peut respectivement appeler la « théorie achéenne », la « théorie phénicienne » et la « théorie autochtone ». C'est cette dernière qui actuellement fait consensus. Selon ses défenseurs, les poleis de l'île auraient été constituées en royaumes dès le XIe s. en prenant pour base une organisation politique et socio-économique héritée de l'Âge du Bronze. Dans cet ouvrage, l'auteur entend démontrer que cette vision des choses est erronée et ne se fonde sur aucune évidence archéologique ou textuelle. En dépit d'une certaine hiérarchisation sociale visible dans les ensevelissements, les polities cypriotes du début de l'Âge du Fer (I-II) ne constituent pas des États, mais des entités moins centralisées que l'on peut désigner du terme de « chefferies ». Les différents corrélats anthropologiques de l'État ne sont pas visibles avant la fin du IXe s. C'est surtout au VIIIe s. (Cypro-Géométrique III/ Cypro-Archaïque I) que des changements profonds ont lieu, à la suite des contacts croissants avec les Phéniciens et de leur i
FORTHCOMING: The Hypocephalus: An Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet by Tamás Mekis. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 95 figures, 36 plates (Print RRP: £55.00). 586 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology . ISBN 9781789693331. Buy Now

The hypocephalus is an element of Late Period and Ptolemaic funerary equipment – an amuletic disc placed under the head of mummies. Its shape emulates the sun’s disc, and its form is planar, although it occasionally has a concave shape (in such cases, it protects the head as a funerary cap). The earliest known example can be dated to the 4th century BC and the latest to the 2nd/1st century BC.

The Hypocephalus: An Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet analyses both the texts and iconography of these objects. So far, 158 examples are known; several, unfortunately, from old descriptions only. The relatively low number shows that the object was not a widespread item of funerary equipment. Only priest and priestly families used them, those of Amon in Thebes, of Min in Akhmim, and the ones of Ptah in Memphis.

Among the examples, no two are identical. In some details, every piece is an individualized creation. Ancient Egyptian theologians certainly interpreted hypocephali as the iris of the wedjat-eye, amidst which travels the sun-god in his hidden, mysterious and tremendous form(s). The hypocephalus can be considered as the sun-disk itself. It radiates light and energy towards the head of the deceased, who again becomes a living being, feeling him/herself as ‘one with the Earth’ through this energy.

The texts and the iconography derive principally from the supplementary chapters of the Book of the Dead. Some discs directly cite the text of spell 162 which furnishes the mythological background of the invention of the disc by the Great Cow, who protected her son Re by creating the disc at his death.

About the Author
Tamás Mekis is an independent researcher who graduated from the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest with a degree in Egyptology (2007). In quest of hypocephalus amulets, he spent his traineeship at the Royal Museums of Art and History, Brussels, in 2008 and at the Louvre Museum in 2010. He has also conducted research at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo.