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NEW: Blood, Faith and Iron: A dynasty of Catholic industrialists in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England by Paul Belford. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+226 pages; 54 figures (black & white throughout). (Print RRP £34.00). 490 2018. ISBN 9781789690682. £34.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Ironbridge Gorge is an iconic industrial landscape, presented as the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution and so part of a national narrative of heroic Protestant individualism. However this is not the full story. In fact this industrial landscape was created by an entrepreneurial Catholic dynasty over 200 years before the Iron Bridge was built. This book tells that story for the first time.

Acquiring land at the Dissolution of the Monasteries, the Brooke family invested in coal mining and iron production – and introduced a radical new method of steelmaking which transformed that industry. Drawing together years of painstaking archaeological and historical research, this book looks in detail at the landscape, buildings and industrial installations created by the Brooke dynasty between the Dissolution and the English Civil War. It also explores the broader contexts – religious, economic and political – which shaped their mind-set and their actions. It considers medieval influences on these later developments, and looks at how the Brookes’ Catholicism was reflected in the way they created a new industrial landscape. In so doing it questions traditional narratives of English industrialisation, and calls for a more sophisticated understanding of this period by historical archaeologists.

About the Author PAUL BELFORD is an archaeologist. Currently the Director of the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust, he was for ten years Head of Archaeology at the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust. His main interests include early industrialisation, urban archaeology, the archaeology of earthwork monuments, and public engagement with archaeology and cultural heritage. A Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, Dr Belford is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.
NEW: Narratives and Journeys in Rock Art: A Reader edited by George Nash and Aron Mazel. Paperback; 175x245mm; xiv+686 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (81 plates in colour). (Print RRP £75.00). 484 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915605. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915612. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Why publish a Reader? Today, it is relatively easy and convenient to switch on your computer and download an academic paper. However, as many scholars have experienced, historic references are difficult to access. Moreover, some are now lost and are merely references in later papers. This can be frustrating. This book provides a series of papers from all over the world that extend as far back as the 1970s when rock art research was in its infancy. The papers presented in the Reader reflect the development in the various approaches that have influenced advancing scholarly research.

About the Editors
GEORGE NASH is an Associate Professor at Geosciences Centre of Coimbra University (u. ID73-FCT), Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (IPT), Portugal. Dr Nash is a specialist in openair rock art and contemporary street art and has recently undertaken fieldwork and research in Andean Chile, the Negev Desert in southern Israel, central Portugal and Wales.

ARON MAZEL is a Reader in Heritage Studies at Newcastle University, United Kingdom. Dr Mazel has done extensive recording of rock art in the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg (South Africa) and Northumberland (United Kingdom).
NEW: The River: Peoples and Histories of the Omo-Turkana Area edited by Timothy Clack and Marcus Brittain. Paperback; 210x210mm; xii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (121 colour plates). (Print RRP £40.00). 480 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690330. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690347. Book contents pageDownload

The Omo-Turkana area is unlike any place on earth. Spanning parts of Ethiopia, South Sudan and Kenya, the area is today home to a unique diversity of peoples and cultures. Extraordinary fossil finds from the locale have illuminated the evolutionary origins of our species and archaeological and historical evidence has demonstrated it has been a dynamic crossroads of peoples, languages and identities for millennia. Over the past two decades, development interventions have transformed the environment and presented a threat to local forms of material and intangible heritage. Many local groups now face challenges to the long-term sustainability of their traditional ways of life. This sumptuously illustrated book brings together a remarkable collection of the world’s leading archaeologists, ecologists, historians and ethnographers who specialise in the locale. Recognising the Omo-Turkana area as a crucial resource of global heritage, the authors also acknowledge its current vulnerability.

‘The current socio-economic and political happenings in the Omo-Turkana Basin are profoundly disturbing. Showcasing the area’s global importance, this compilation is a timely and crucial landmark in the pages of African history and archaeology’. - Dr Richard Leakey, Turkana Basin Institute

‘Written by eminent scholars, this book showcases the rich and unique heritage of the Lower Omo Valley from prehistory to the present’. - Prof Tekle Hagos, Addis Ababa University

‘This collection of essays highlights the deep history of the Omo-Turkana basin, and the material and cultural traditions of the region’s inhabitants past and present. The reader is treated to rich, textured insights into the remarkable heritage of this part of the African continent, the many environmental and political challenges facing today’s inhabitants, and their continuing resilience in the face of adversity’. - Prof Paul Lane, University of Cambridge

NEW: Roots of Nationhood: The Archaeology and History of Scotland edited by Louisa Campbell, Dene Wright, Nicola A. Hall. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+210 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 plates in colour. 478 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919825. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919832. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In a break away from the traditional mono-disciplinary scope of academic enquiry, this volume sets forth a challenge for practitioners within, and outwith archaeology to develop multi-disciplinary approaches in the study of identity in general and aspects in the formation of national identity in particular. The entanglement of identity and nationhood is explored from the prehistory of northern Britain; the establishment of a proto-Scottish identity in the early Middle Ages; facets of Scottish identity at home and in the wider diaspora of Empire; and the more recent heralding of Scottish identity as a multiethnic construction. Set against the backdrop of a groundswell change in the Scottish political landscape and the unprecedented, and largely unexpected, energised and proactive politicisation of the Scottish electorate in the lead up to and aftermath of the 2014 Independence Referendum, the volume is a timely and relevant contribution to discussions of national identities. By bringing together specialists covering a wide array of time periods and subject specialisms, we transcend the concept of identity. This is achieved by exploring the links of nationhood and Scottish identity in the early 20th and 21st Centuries in the ongoing quest for independence demonstrating the political manipulation of history, imagery and mythology entangled in political propaganda.

About the Editors
LOUISA CAMPBELL MA PhD FSA Scot is a graduate of the University of Glasgow. She a Roman ceramic specialist and her main research interests are threefold: material culture, the Roman and Provincial interface with a particular focus on frontier contexts and theoretical approaches to the study of culture contact. She has recently undertaken a Postdoctoral Fellowship supported by Historic Environment Scotland to develop innovative methodologies and technologies for the non-destructive in situ analysis of museum collections. This project, entitled Paints and Pigments in the Past (PPIP), resulted in the identification and reconstruction of pigments originally applied to Roman monumental sculptures from the Antonine Wall and Hadrian’s Wall.

DENE WRIGHT MA MLitt PhD FSA Scot is a graduate of the University of Glasgow. Dene is a lithic specialist and his principal research interest is the Mesolithic. His research centres on the Mesolithic of Scotland with a particular focus on west central Scotland. The structure of his research develops and incorporates Deleuzian theoretical approaches to the concepts of repetition, difference and becoming, identity and group identities as philosophical constructs in Archaeology, the symmetry of lithic technology and technological choices, symmetrical approaches to the chaîne opératoire and lithic analysis and the construct of time as a relational multiplicity of dimensions in co-existence. A research associate at Glasgow funded by Historic Environment Scotland, with Kenneth Brophy he is currently writing up for publication the excavations for Phase II (2012-17) of the Strathearn Environs & Royal Forteviot ‘SERF’ Project.

NICOLA A. HALL MA MLitt is a Senior Heritage Management Officer at Historic Environment Scotland. She is an Archaeology graduate of the University of Glasgow with a particular interest on ritual practice in the Neolithic/Early Bronze Age of Western Scotland. Her research incorporates archaeological theory, landscape archaeology, gender, ritual practice and seasonality.
NEW: Barrow Old Hall and Twiss Green Investigations of two sub-manorial estate centres within the townships of Bold and Culcheth in the Hundred of Warrington 1982-87 by Dan Garner, Jennifer Lewis and David Freke, edited by Jill Collens. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+108 pages; 93 illustrations (30 plates in colour). (Print RRP £30.00). 473 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919689. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919696. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations were carried out at the moated sites of Barrow Old Hall and Twiss Green, in Warrington, North West England, in the 1980s. Sub-manorial estates were established at these two sites by the fourteenth century, located near the boundaries of their multi-moated townships. Townships with multiple moats were a feature of parts of North West England and may have been the result of medieval assarting and the expansion of agriculture on to fringe or marginal areas, on the boundaries of earlier manors. It also owed much to the unusual tenurial arrangements of the region, whereby lords granted small estates out of their holdings, often to family members, to construct moated homesteads.

This report presents the results of the excavations at these two small moated sites, including evidence for possible aisled halls at both sites, as well as a significant assemblage of medieval and early post-medieval pottery. There is also a full account of the finding of the remains of a timber bridge at Twiss Green and its full reconstruction; an illustration of which was previously published in the Shire Archaeology series book on Moated Sites in 1985.

The publication of these excavations contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of the role and development of moated sites in this part of North West England and completes the outstanding analysis of moated sites excavated in the Warrington area.
NEW: Die Bleifunde der römisch-republikanischen Anlage von Sanisera, Menorca Archäologische und archäometrische Analyse by Regine Müller. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+248 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (54 plates in colour). (Print RRP £38.00). 462 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919887. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919894. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume includes the archaeological and archaeometrical analysis of the lead finds from the Roman Republican military fort of Sanisera in northern Minorca. The fort was built after the Roman conquest of the island in 123 BC and abandoned during the last third of the 1st century BC. By correlating typological-archaeological and scientific methods, the site’s unusual large number of lead objects/artefacts are examined within their find context and reviewed for superregional connections to contemporary sites within the Mediterranean. Furthermore, based upon the results of the find analyses as well as the examination of written sources, the site’s embedding within the historical context of the development of the late Roman Republic and early Imperial times is presented, especially in respect to the conquest of the Mediterranean and the consolidation of the Roman authority there.

Die vorliegende Arbeit umfasst die archäologische und archäometrische Analyse der Bleifunde der römisch-republikanischen Militäranlage von Sanisera im Norden Menorcas. Die Anlage entstand nach 123 v. Chr. in Folge der Eroberungen der Baleareninseln und wurde spätestens im letzten Drittel des 1. Jh. v. Chr. aufgegeben. Anhand der Korrelation typologisch-archäologischer und naturwissenschaftlicher Methoden wird hier die ungewöhnlich hohe Anzahl von Bleifunden aus der Anlage innerhalb ihres Fundkontextes analysiert und auf überregionale Verbindungen zu kontemporären Fundorten im Mittelmeerraum überprüft. Darüber hinaus erfolgt - basierend auf den Ergebnissen der Fundanalyse sowie der Auswertung von Schriftquellen - die Einbindung der Anlage in den historischen Kontext der späten römischen Republik und frühen Kaiserzeit, besonders im Zusammenhang mit der Eroberung des Mittelmeerraums und der Konsolidierung der römischen Vorherrschaft dort.

About the Author
REGINE MÜLLER studied Early- and Prehistorical Archaeology, Medieval History and Philosophy at the Justus-Liebig-University in Giessen. Her Magister thesis encompassed the archaeological analyses of the early medieval graveyard of Sindelsdorf, district of Weilheim-Schongau. The author participated at the excavations of the Roman military fort in Sanisera, Menorca for several years. Resulting from this, the study of the site’s lead objects within the frame of a PhD thesis at the Goethe-University in Frankfurt was undertaken. She still researches isotope analyses of lead slingshots and has been working for several years now as an archaeologist in Germany.

REGINE MÜLLER hat an der Justus-Liebig-Universität in Gießen Vor- und Frühgeschichte, Mittlere Geschichte und Philosophie studiert. Ihre Magisterarbeit behandelte die archäologische Analyse des frühmittelalterlichen Gräberfeldes von Sindelsdorf, Kr. Weilheim-Schongau. Aus der mehrjährigen Grabungstätigkeit in der römischen Militäranlage von Sanisera im Norden Menorcas ging die vorliegende Untersuchung zu deren Bleifunden im Rahmen einer Dissertation an der Goethe-Universität-Frankfurt hervor. Die Studien zur Bleiisotopenanalyse, vornehmlich von Schleuderbleien, setzte sie auch im Anschluss an die Dissertation weiter fort. Seit mehreren Jahren ist sie in Deutschland als Archäologin tätig.
NEW: Tarascan Copper Metallurgy: A Multiapproach Perspective by Blanca Estela Maldonado. Paperback; 205x290mm; 168pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £32.00). 447 2018 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916251. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916268. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the early sixteenth century much of West México was under the rule of the Purhépecha Empire, known to Europeans as the Tarascan Kingdom of Michuacan. Both archaeological and ethnohistorical evidence indicate that during the Late Postclassic Period (A.D. 1350-1525) this political unit was the primary center for metallurgy and metalworking in Mesoamerica. This technology was largely based on copper and its alloys.

Tarascan Copper Metallurgy: A multiapproach perspective focuses on evidence recovered from the area surrounding Santa Clara del Cobre, a Tarascan community in Central Michoacán. This pioneer research required the employment of multiple strands of evidence, including archaeological survey and excavation, ethnoarchaeology, experimental replication, and archaeometallurgy. Intensive surface survey located concentrations of manufacturing byproducts (i.e. slag) on surface that represented potential production areas. Stratigraphic excavation and subsequent archaeometallurgical analysis of physical remains were combined with ethnohistorical and ethnoarchaeological data, as well as comparative analogy, to propose a model for prehispanic copper production among the Tarascans.

The goal of this analysis was to gain insights into the nature of metal production and its role in the major state apparatus. The study provides valuable insights into the development of technology and political economy in ancient Mesoamerica and offers a contribution to general anthropological theories of the emergence of social complexity.

About the Author
BLANCA MALDONADO is an archaeologist specialised in ancient metallurgy and production processes. Specific areas of interest include pre-Columbian copper metallurgy in the New World, preindustrial non-ferrous metallurgy, and the cultural dynamics of technological practices. Her research has focused mainly on Mesoamerica and the South Central Andes.

Prof. Maldonado holds a PhD in Anthropology from The Pennsylvania State University, with specialization in Archaeology. Her doctoral studies included training in archaeological science and archaeometallurgy at the University of Oxford and at University College London. She has received several research grants and awards, including a DAAD Research Grant (for an Academic Stay at the University of Bonn, Germany) and a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, also in Germany (Curt-Engelhorn-Zentrum Archäometrie Mannheim). She is currently Professor and Researcher in the Centre for Archaeological Studies at El Colegio de Michoacán, A.C, in Mexico.

NEW: To Die in Style! The Residential Lifestyle of Feasting and Dying in Iron Age Stamna, Greece by Gioulika-Olga Christakopoulou. Paperback; 175x245pp; ii+77 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 445 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919351. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919368. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £22.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Symposium in Stamna both as a concept and as a process involved the presence of prominent citizens of the social establishment, as testified by the large cauldrons, tripod jars and tripod vessels present. This study re-examines the cemeteries studied to date, isolating tombs with unique architecture or peculiar structures with individual features, in order to investigate the complex identity of the elite group ideologies.

The finding and studying of such a large number of PRG tombs (500 ca) presents a good representative example for discussing the perception of death, and how it was confronted through the mourning ritual. The data also presents an opportunity to examine the creation of individual and collective memory in a population that operated in this privileged location, redefining as such the cultural landscape of the Protogeometric era. The pre-existing theoretical framework, the methodology of the managing and displaying of grief and their correlation with already-studied and exalted geographical parallels, integrate Stamna into the cultural chain of populations ruled by an overall-systematic design of a particular cultural ideology.

About the Author
GIOULIKA-OLGA CHRISTAKOPOULOU was born in Patras in 1968 and holds a degree in History and Archaeology from the University of Ioannina, and a PhD in Archaeology from the National Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. For the past twenty-five years she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities in Achaia, Greece. She also worked as a Lecturer until 2014, teaching ‘Ancient Monumental Topography’ in the Department of Museology, Museography and Exhibition Planning, at the University of Applied Studies, Western Greece. She has dedicated special attention to the study of the Iron Age in Ancient Stamna, Aetolia, and her research and publications focus on the population movement, burial architecture and burial rituals of this period.
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NEW: Roman Funerary Monuments of South-Western Pannonia in their Material, Social, and Religious Context by Branka Migotti, Marjeta Šašel Kos and Ivan Radman-Livaja. Paperback; 205x290; ix+276 pages; 308 figures (133 plates in colour). 476 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 45. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690217. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690224. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book has come about as a result of the project Roman Funerary Monuments of South-Western Pannonia in their Material, Social, and Religious Context, unfolding between 2015 and 2018 in the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts under the auspices of the Croatian Science Foundation, with B. Migotti as the project leader and M. Šašel Kos and I. Radman-Livaja as collaborators.

Roman Funerary Monuments of South-Western Pannonia in their Material, Social, and Religious Context examines around two hundred funerary monuments and fragments (stelai, sarcophagi, ash-chests, tituli, altars, medallions and buildings) from three Roman cities in the south-west part of the Roman province of Pannonia in the territory of north-west Croatia: colonia Siscia (Sisak) and municipia Andautonia (Ščitarjevo) and Aquae Balissae (Daruvar). A juxtaposition of the evidence from three administrative units of different dimensions and municipal profiles, and of unequal importance in the wider area, offered a good opportunity for a meaningful comparison of the main components for a reconstruction of material, social and cultural components of the three Romano-provincial communities. The components studied were: 1 – territorial scope of the individual cities; 2 – quantification of the monuments in terms of kinds and chronology; 3 – structural typology and iconography; 4 – social aspects of the monument use; 5 – ritual and religious aspects (incineration vs. inhumation, classical religion vs. Christianity); 6 – geo-archaeological aspect. The most valuable contributions have been achieved in the geo-archaeological field, as such research had never been carried out in the studied area before.

About the Authors
Branka Migotti was born in Zagreb (Croatia) in 1954 and took the following degrees from the Faculty of Philosophy of the Zagreb University: BA in Archaeology and the English Language in 1978, MA in 1985 and PhD in 1992, both in the field of early Christian archaeology of Dalmatia. She is currently employed at the Division of Archaeology of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Zagreb as a scholarly consultant and Head of the Division, and she is a regular collaborator in the postgraduate study programme ‘Roman and early Christian archaeology’ at the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb. Her main fields of scholarly interests are early Christianity and the funerary archaeology of Pannonia, with emphasis on funerary monuments as evidence for social, material and religious aspects of life in the Roman province.

Marjeta Šašel Kos was born in Ljubljana (Slovenia) in 1952 and took the following degrees from the Faculty of Philosophy of the Ljubljana University: BA in ancient Greek and Archaeology in 1973 and 1974, respectively, MA in 1980 and PhD in 1986, both in the subject of Roman political history in the western Balkans as reflected in the works of the historians Cassius Dio and Herodian. She is currently employed at the Institute of Archaeology of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts as an academic adviser. She is member of the committee of the ‘Association Internationale d’Épigraphie Grecque et Latine’. Since 2005 she is a member of the Scientific Management Committee within the European Project ‘History and Archaeology of the Balkans’, coordinated by the University of Lyon. Her main fields of scholarly interests are the study of Roman political and religious history on the basis of written sources and epigraphic and onomastic evidence, mostly focused on the area of the western Balkans.

Ivan Radman-Livaja was born in Split (Croatia) in 1973, and took the following degrees from the Faculty of Philosophy of the Zagreb University: BA in Archaeology in 1996 and MA in 2002, the latter in the field of Roman military equipment in the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb. He took his doctor’s degree in Ancient History and Archaeology from the École Pratique des Hautes Études (Paris) in 20
NEW: The Affect of Crafting Third Millennium BCE Copper Arrowheads from Ganeshwar, Rajasthan by Uzma Z. Rizvi. Paperback; 210x297; 176 pages; 53 figures, 13 tables plus extensive catalogue (black and white throughout). (Print RRP £32.00). 475 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690033. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690040. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Affect of Crafting presents an interrogation of materiality and crafting, a consideration of the situatedness of the technological practice of crafting itself, and the forms of relationships that exist between all things transformed in the act of crafting: bodies, minerals and landscapes. Linked to those transformations, this volume presents an argument for cultural resonance as a manner through which to understand the resilience and repetition of certain styles and forms of copper arrowheads across the region during the third millennium BCE. Morphological consistency is theorized as producing affective responses that engender belonging: one belongs with and through things.

About the Author
UZMA Z. RIZVI is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Urban Studies, Department of Social Science and Cultural Studies at the Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY. She is also Visiting Researcher at the American University of Sharjah.
NEW: Archaeology and Ethnography Along the Loango Coast in the South West of the Republic of Congo by Gerry Wait and Ibrahima Thiaw with Tim Copeland and Elizabeth Gardner. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+108 pages; 72 figures, 5 tables (100 colour plates). 471 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919948. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919955. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In 2011 and 2012, Dr Gerry Wait (then Nexus Heritage) and Dr Ibrahima Thiaw (Institute Fundamental d’Afrique Noire: IFAN, Dakar) undertook an Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) project in Kouilou Department in the southwest region of the Republic of the Congo. The initiative had been commissioned by SRK Consulting UK for Elemental Minerals Ltd relating to a proposed potash mine. These landscapes were little known in terms of the sites and monuments from the distant and more recent past. That the area was important in the understanding of migrations along the African coast had been demonstrated in a pioneering set of excavations by Denbow (2012 and 2014). This base line study was undertaken to identify and evaluate cultural resources which might need further investigation. The second part of the study reports on ethnographic surveys undertaken in the same defined area, treating intangible cultural heritage as equally as important parts of the Congo’s cultural heritage and identity. The baseline studies were systematic in that they employed standard best-practice survey techniques but structured on a landscape level. By building upon Denbow’s extensive surveys and small-scale investigations from 30 years earlier the studies have enabled a richer and more nuanced understanding of the Atlantic Coast of Congo during the past millennium.

About the Authors
GERRY WAIT has over 35 years of experience as an archaeologist and anthropologist specialising in heritage assessments for Environmental and Social Impact Assessments (ESIAs). He has worked in over 30 countries, in Europe, Asia and Africa. Gerry has been active in the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists and in the Committee on Professional Associations in Archaeology of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA). He is on the editorial board of the Society of American Archaeology’s Advances in Archaeological Practice Journal. He is on the Register of Professional Archaeologists (USA) and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London.

IBRAHIMA THIAW is one of the leading practitioners in Africanist archaeology, heritage and in Environmental and Social Impact Assessments (ESIAs). He leads in the Laboratoire d’Archéologie at the Institut Fondamental d’Afrique Noire (IFAN) at the-Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar Senegal. He has worked extensively in the upper Senegal River basin where he conducted multiple Environmental and Social Impact Assessments. He is equally well known for his work on the UNESCO World Heritage site of Goree Island (Dakar). Ibrahima is a very strong advocate of students’ training, community engagement and the decolonization of Archaeological practice in Africa. He has pioneered marine archaeology in Senegal. He is also an active member in Africanist Archaeologists organizations including the PanAfrican Archaeology Association but also on the editorial board of a number of Professional Journals.

Gerry and Ibrahima have worked together on many projects in Sub-Saharan archaeology and ethnography since 2009, notably at Sabodala Senegal (published by Archaeopress Publishing in 2016) in Sierra Leone, and in Burkino Faso.

ELIZABETH GARDNER has been an archaeological illustrator since 2005. Her work includes all aspects of archaeological dissemination and publication. She is a full Member of both the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (CIfA) and the Institute of Archaeologists of Ireland (IAI). Alongside commercial archaeological work, Elizabeth has been involved in monograph projects such as Glastonbury Abbey (University of Reading, AHRC, Society of Antiquaries (London)), Bathwick, Bath (Context One Archaeological Services) and Godmanchester (Historic England and Oxford Archaeology) as well as populist publications such as Glendalough (Christiaan Corlett). She is active in CIfA as the graphics specialist assessment officer for membership validation.

TIM COPELAND is a
NEW: Burial Mounds in Europe and Japan Comparative and Contextual Perspectives edited by Thomas Knopf, Werner Steinhaus and Shin’ya Fukunaga. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+226 pages; 162 figures, 1 List, 1 Table (76 plates in colour). 470 2018 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690071. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690088. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Burial Mounds in Europe and Japan brings together specialists of the European Bronze and Iron Age and the Japanese Yayoi and Kofun periods for the first time to discuss burial mounds in a comparative context. The book aims to strengthen knowledge of Japanese archaeology in Europe and vice versa.

The papers demonstrate many methodological and interpretive commonalities in the archaeology of burial mounds in Japan and Europe and provide a series of state-of-the-art case studies highlighting many different aspects of burial mound research in both regions. Topics addressed by both European and Japanese specialists include research histories, excavation methods, origins and development of graves with burial mounds, the relationship of burial mounds to settlements and landscape, and above all administrative power and ritual.

About the Editors
Thomas Knopf is Professor of Pre- and Protohistory at the University of Tübingen in Germany. He has conducted fieldwork at some of the largest Celtic settlements in Europe. He works on theoretical themes including the concept of continuity, and is a specialist in human-environments relationships in prehistory. He works together with soils scientists and archaeobotanists focussing on the development and the perception of landscapes.

Werner Steinhaus is Lecturer in Archaeology at Hiroshima University in Japan. After graduating from Freiburg University in Germany he undertook postgraduate research at Ōsaka University in Japan, specialising in the archaeology of the Kofun period. He curated the largest overseas exhibition of Japanese archaeology Die Zeit der Morgenröte, held in Germany in 2004-2005.

FUKUNAGA Shin’ya is Professor of Archaeology at the Graduate School of Letters at Ōsaka University in Japan. He graduated and received his doctorate from the Department of History, Graduate School of Letters, Ōsaka University. Professor Fukunaga is a member of the Science Council of Japan and the Committee for the World Heritage Inscription of the Mozu-Furuichi Kofun groups of mounted tombs. His publications include From the Yamatai Kingdom to the Yamato Court (Ōsaka University Press, in Japanese).
NEW: Introduzione alle antichità di Ventotene Ricerche archeologiche nell’isola di Ventotene 1 by Giovanni Maria De Rossi and Salvatore Medaglia. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+120 pages; 158 figures (81 plates in colour). Italian text. 469 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 44. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690170. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690187. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ventotene is a small island located in the Tyrrhenian sea, known in Antiquity as Pandateria. The site hosts the ruins of a large Roman villa for otium dated to the Augustan age where, during the first century AD, many women related to imperial families were exiled and enclosed. Notable figures exiled to Ventotene include Agrippina the Elder, Julia Livilla and Claudia Octavia, amongst others. This volume is an introduction to the roman antiquities of the island and is the first of a series of thematic monographs dedicated to the island. The first part of the book offers a brief overview of the geology of the island and reviews the studies and archaeological excavations carried out in Ventotene since the 18th century. The central part of the monograph is dedicated to the reconstruction of the historical events that have affected the island and to the development of the archaeological topography of the Roman age. The final chapter examines the numerous underwater archaeological discoveries made in the waters surrounding the island.

Ventotene è una piccola isola del medio Tirreno conosciuta nell’antichità con il nome di Pandateria. In questo luogo si conservano gli imponenti resti di una villa romana di età augustea destinata all’otium. Nel corso del I sec. d.C. l’isola funse da luogo di prigionia per una serie di donne legate alla famiglia imperiale che vi furono mandate in esilio. La prima di esse fu, nel 2 a.C., Giulia: era stata accusata di impudicizia sulla base della ‘Lex Iulia de adulteriis coercendis’ e rimase nell’isola con sua madre Scribonia, che la seguì volontariamente, fino al 3 d.C. Nel 29 d.C. la relagatio ad insulam toccò ad Agrippina Maggiore esiliata su ordine di Tiberio: la figlia di Giulia e di Vipsanio Agrippa morì a Ventotene nel 33 d.C. e le sue spoglie furono recuperate e riportate in pompa magna a Roma da Caligola nel 37 d.C. Dal 39 al 41 d.C. l’imperatore Caligola confinò a Pandateria sua sorella Iulia Livilla. Nel 62 d.C. Nerone mandò in esilio a Ventotene Ottavia, sua prima moglie, che vi morì solo pochi giorni dopo. L’ultima esiliata fu, nel 95 d.C., Flavia Domitilla, nipote di Domiziano, accusata di giudaismo. Questo volume costituisce un’introduzione alle antichità romane di Ventotene ed è il primo di una serie contributi monografici dedicati da Archaeopress Publishing al patrimonio archeologico isolano. Nella prima parte del libro si offre una breve panoramica sulla geologia e sulla storia degli studi e degli scavi che hanno interessato Ventotene sin dal XVIII secolo. La parte centrale della monografia è dedicata alla ricostruzione dei tempi e dei modi che hanno caratterizzato lo sviluppo insediamentale dell’isola e si fornisce un esauriente quadro della topografia di età imperiale. Il capitolo finale prende in esame le numerose testimonianze archeologiche recuperate nelle acque che circondano Ventotene.

About the Authors
Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Rome, 1942), Professor of Topography of ancient Italy at University of Salerno, has published many books about ancient and medieval Topography. He has directed archaelogical excavations in Italy; he conceived and designed the Archaeological Park and Historical and Archaeological Museum in Ventotene island; he has directed, in Ventotene, the archaeological excavations and, for twenty years, the Museum. | Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Roma, 1942), Professore Ordinario di Topografia dell’Italia Antica presso l’Università di Salerno, è autore di molte pubblicazioni scientifiche di Topografia antica e medievale. Ha diretto numerosi scavi in Italia. Ha ideato il Parco Archeologico e il Museo Storico Archeologico dell’Isola di Ventotene, dirigendo, nell’isola, gli scavi e, per 20 anni, il Museo.

Salvatore Medaglia (Crotone, 1971) is a classical archaeologist. He holds a PhD in Ancient Topography from the University of Salento and a joint Post-PhD in Landscape Archaeology at the University of Calabria and the University o
NEW: At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion Papers in Memory of Carin M. C. Green edited by Sinclair W. Bell and Lora L. Holland. Paperback; 175x245mm; xxiv+276 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 plates in colour. 468 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690132. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690149. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion brings together recent research from a range of upcoming and well-established scholars to demonstrate the richness of the cross-cultural exchange of ideas around the ancient Mediterranean along with the reception of and continuing dialogues with these ideas in the medieval and modern worlds. The crossroads theme both honours the memory of our late colleague and friend Carin M. C. Green, who published an important book on the cult of Diana—one of whose aspects was Trivia, the goddess of crossroads—and emphasizes how each encounter of new topic or genre forces the reader to pause and think before proceeding down the new path.

The contents are arranged accordingly under three headings: (1) Greek philosophy, history, and historiography; (2) Latin literature, history, and historiography; and (3) Greco-Roman material culture, religion, and literature. These papers also coincide in myriad ways across the three headings, tracing themes such as friendship, leadership, and the reception of ideas in the arenas of philosophy, historiography, manuscript studies, poetry, medicine, art, and war. Within this delimited framework, the volume’s diversity of topics and approaches to a range of genres in the Greco- Roman world is intended both to appeal to the general scholar with varied interests and to offer students a wide scope through which to consider those genres.

About the Editors
SINCLAIR W. BELL is a classical archaeologist and art historian who teaches at Northern Illinois University. He is the co-editor of ten books, the Associate Editor of Etruscan and Italic Studies, and the author of numerous works on Etruscan and Roman art and archaeology. He is a recipient of fellowships from the American Academy in Rome, the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, and the George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation.

LORA L. HOLLAND chairs the department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Her main area of research is the religions of the Roman Republic but she has published on a wide range of topics, including Greek tragedy, Roman comedy, and the history of women in Roman religion. She is a former Blegen Research Fellow at Vassar College, Visiting Fellow in Greek and Roman Religion at the Center for Hellenic Studies, and Visiting Scholar at the American Academy in Rome.
NEW: The Grotte du Placard at 150: New Considerations on an Exceptional Prehistoric Site edited by Christophe Delage. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+198 pages; 98 illustrations, 10 tables (62 plates in colour). 467 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919603. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919610. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageDownload

The prehistoric site of Le Placard, located in Southwest France, was discovered and first explored 150 years ago at a time when prehistory was just emerging as a scientific discipline. Through this century and a half of explorations this site has been involved in numerous debates of prehistoric research; it has also yielded an extraordinary amount and diverse range of archaeological materials (i.e. lithics, fauna, osseous industry, body adornments, pigments, human remains, mobiliary and parietal art, hearths, etc.). Yet this site appears now poorly valued due to the devastating 19th-century excavation techniques that almost completely emptied the cavity. Subsequently it is surprisingly ill-known. This 150-year milestone gives us an opportunity to look back at this exceptional site and its associated materials in order to demonstrate that it still holds a unique potential in the debates about these Late Pleistocene hunting and gathering societies. The various chapters cover multiple aspects of the history of research and of the collections, present detailed studies on the material culture (osseous industry, spearthrowers, musical instruments), and address speci¬fic issues related to parietal art, social networks and the political nature of these prehistoric communities. The best hypothesis and explanation to account for this exceptional diversity of remains would argue that Le Placard has been a village occupied by various groups of complex (transegalitarian) hunter-gatherers.

About the Editor
Christophe Delage (Ph.D., 2001, University of Paris 1-Sorbonne) is a specialist of lithic raw material sourcing and chipped stone industries. He has been working in the Southern Levant (Israel and Jordan) for 25 years and in Southwest France (Charente and Vienne) on the Magdalenian for about 10 years. He has published various articles and edited books related to these topics. He is currently affiliated with the Department of Prehistory, National Museum of Natural History (Paris).
NEW: Une archéologie des provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo edited by Bernard Clist, Pierre de Maret and Koen Bostoen. Paperback; 205x290mm; 500pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (approx. 205 plates in colour). French text throughout. 465 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919726. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919733. Book contents pageDownload

Of all the great kingdoms that flourished in Africa, the Kongo is one of the most famous. It remains an important historical and cultural reference for Africans and their diaspora. The KongoKing inter-university project (2012-2016), funded by the European Research Council, aimed, through an interdisciplinary approach, to understand the origin of the kingdom and to shed light on the phenomena of political centralization, economic integration and linguistic evolution that took place there. This book presents in detail the results of archaeological research carried out by the KongoKing project in the former northern provinces of the Kongo Kingdom, currently located in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

French Description: De tous les grands royaumes qui fleurirent en Afrique, le royaume Kongo est l’un des plus célèbres. Il reste une référence historique et culturelle importante pour les Africains et leur diaspora. Entraînés très tôt dans le commerce de traite, les esclaves originaires de la région font que du Brésil à New York, en passant par les Caraïbes, la culture Kongo a laissé de nombreuses traces.

Le projet interuniversitaire KongoKing (2012-2016), financé par le Conseil Européen de la Recherche a été coordonné par Koen Bostoen, tandis que Bernard Clist et Pierre de Maret en ont dirigé le volet archéologique. Ce projet visait par une approche interdisciplinaire à comprendre l’origine du royaume et à éclairer les phénomènes de la centralisation politique, d’intégration économique et d’évolution linguistique qui s’y sont déroulés .

Cet ouvrage présente de façon détaillée les résultats des recherches archéologiques menées par le projet KongoKing dans les anciennes provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo, situées actuellement en République Démocratique du Congo. Dans une première partie on présente le contexte général, l’évolution du milieu, l’histoire du groupe linguistique kikongo et ce que l'on sait des périodes qui précèdent le royaume, ainsi que des informations récoltées dans diverses sources historiques sur ces provinces. Les prospections et fouilles des différents sites étudiés sont ensuite présentées. Puis vient le bilan des recherches archéologiques avec une synthèse des datations, une esquisse de la séquence chrono-culturelle de la poterie kongo et les études systématiques des différents types de vestiges récoltés. Pour conclure, on présente la synthèse de l'ensemble de ces découvertes et la façon dont celles-ci viennent compléter les données issues des autres disciplines pour éclairer d'un jour nouveau l'histoire du royaume Kongo.

BERNARD CLIST est actuellement professeur invité de l’Université de Gand (UGent). Il est archéologue depuis 38 ans, spécialiste de l’Afrique centrale où il a dirigé des projets de recherches notamment en Angola, Cameroun, Gabon et Guinée-Equatoriale. Entre 1985 et 1995 il a été le responsable du Département d’Archéologie du CICIBA au Gabon qu’il a créé. Il a aussi réalisé de nombreuses Etudes d’Impact Environnemental pour des sociétés américaines, britanniques, françaises au Gabon et en Zambie. Pendant toutes ces années, il a publié ou co-publié plus de 130 articles et 8 ouvrages. Entre 2015 et 2016, il a contribué à la version finale du dossier de classement par l’UNESCO du centre historique de Mbanza Kongo au Patrimoine Mondial de l’Humanité, chose acquise en juillet 2017.

PIERRE DE MARET est professeur d’anthropologie et d’archéologie à l’Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) dont il a été le recteur, et Honorary professor à l’University College de Londres. Il poursuit depuis plus de 45 ans des recherches sur le terrain en Afrique centrale et est l’auteur de nombreuses publications sur l’histoire précoloniale, l’anthropologie économique et appliquée, et la gestion culturelle. Membre de l’Académie Royale de Belgique, il est aussi président du conseil scientifique du Musée Royal de l’Afrique Centrale (MRAC)
NEW: The Law of Treasure by A.G. Guest with the assistance of Paul Matthews. Paperback; 175x245mm; x+152 pages. 459 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919740. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919757. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £22.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The importance of the Law of Treasure is largely the result of the spectacular growth in the activity of metal detecting which, starting in the 1960’s, has grown so much in popularity that it now brings to our knowledge each year more than a thousand objects of historical, cultural or archaeological interest. The nature and volume of these finds has in turn led to a greater public concern to ensure that measures exist which will be conducive to the retention and effective preservation of the more important of those objects.

It is, of course, essential that facilities exist for the physical examination and conservation of finds and that those facilities should be accessible and adequate. But the law has an important part to play in this process by ensuring that finds of substantial value or importance should be preserved for the nation and made available to the public in museums.

For many hundreds of years, the Law of Treasure was the common law of treasure trove. Today it is essentially based on the Treasure Act 1996. Although the Act is a great improvement on the common law it is nevertheless not always rational and the meaning of some of its provisions is sometimes obscure. This book aims to provide a reliable guide to the Law of Treasure in England, Wales and Northern Ireland and also to explain the role played by legal institutions, such as the Coroner, in that process.

This book will be of interest to archaeologists, museums, coroner’s offices, finds liaison officers, farmers and landlords’ associations. It will also be of interest and utility to metal detectorists since, in addition to explaining what objects are considered to be treasure by the law, it explains the legal restrictions on searching for artefacts, the duty to report finds of treasure and the structure of the valuation process and rewards.

About the Authors
Professor Tony Guest is emeritus Professor of Law at King’s College, London. He has been the editor of a number of legal text books including Chitty on Contracts and Benjamin’s Sale of Goods and the author of Guest on Assignment. He has been assisted by Judge Paul Matthews who is a specialist Civil Circuit Judge (Chancery) and who was formerly HM Senior Coroner for the City of London. Judge Matthews is an honorary professor of law at King’s College and the editor of Jervis on Coroners.
NEW: Iron Oxide Rock Artefacts in Mesopotamia c. 2600-1200 BC An interdisciplinary study of hematite, goethite and magnetite objects by Martine Marieke Melein. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+258 pages; 49 figures; 52 tables (85 plates in colour). 453 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919641. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919658. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The flourishing civilisations of Mesopotamia, nowadays Iraq and Syria, imported all kinds of materials from the surrounding regions. Iron oxide rock (hematite, goethite and magnetite) was very popular for weight stones and cylinder seals around 2000 BC. This research aims to determine the region of origin for the raw material, what made people start using iron oxide rock, and what led them to stop using it. To answer these questions, a multidisciplinary approach was applied. Geology and archaeology were combined to identify Northern Syria as the region of origin. Archaeometric research of the production process showed that technological change concurred with the start and end of the use of iron oxide rock. Cuneiform texts yielded, among other information, the earliest description of magnetism known to mankind. Furthermore, element and mineral composition of 50 artefacts from three Dutch collections were determined with modern, non-destructive analysis techniques.

About the Author
Martine Melein grew up in the most southern part of the Netherlands. Her interest in archaeology began when she was very young, and her grandfather told her stories about ancient cultures. When she was 17, she left Maastricht to study archaeology in Leiden. She is the first of her family to have completed an academic education. After finishing her doctoral education in Mesopotamian archaeology, and obtaining a post-academic teaching degree in social science, she lectured on various Ancient Near Eastern subjects at Leiden University, as well as for the general public. During her PhD-research she raised a family and earned money as a housekeeper, lunch lady, educational co-ordinator of Geo- and Bioarchaeology at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and finally assistant to the director of the academic teacher education, also at Vrije Universiteit. She presented her research at several ICAANE and RAI conferences and participated in the international METROLOGIA-research group, as well as in scientific workshops on themes such as metrology and pigments. One of Martine’s major strengths lies in combining scientific disciplines, thus allowing to tell a more complete and balanced story of our past.
NEW: A Bestiary of Monsters in Greek Mythology by Spyros Syropoulos. Paperback; 148x210mm; viii+140 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 colour plates). (Print £19.99). 451 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919504. £19.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919511. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Greek myths abound in images of beauty and perfection: charming gods, attractive goddesses, and handsome heroes, all of them standards of physical and spiritual flawlessness. However, the ancient Greeks were not fond of absolutes. No god or hero is shown without blemishes in character and ethics, and some are even physically imperfect, like Hephaestus, who is ugly and lame. Another element that dominates Greek mythology is the idea of balance. Good and evil, light and darkness, hubris and punishment. What could not be missing from this world is the image of reversed beauty: monstrosity. The aim of this book is to explore the realm of the imaginary world of Greek mythology and present the reader with a categorization of monstrosity, referring to some of the most noted examples in each category.

About the Author
SPYROS SYROPOULOS is an Associate Professor of Ancient Greek Literature at the Dept of Mediterranean Studies of the University of the Aegean in Rhodes. He is the acting Vice-Rector of the University of the Aegean (2014-2018). Since 2006, he teaches Ancient Greek Theater at the Open University of Greece. He is the director of the Masters Course ‘Theater as a social and political institution during antiquity’ at the Department of Mediterranean Studies of the University of the Aegean. He is the founder and editor of the electronic journal ELECTRYONE (http://www.electryone.gr) and since 2017 he is the General Secretary of the Greek delegation at the European University Association.
NEW: Winifred Lamb: Aegean Prehistorian and Museum Curator by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 148x210mm; 340pp. (Print RRP £30.00). 448 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918798. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918804. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

Winifred Lamb was a pioneering archaeologist in Anatolia and the Aegean. She studied classics at Newnham College, Cambridge, and subsequently served in naval intelligence alongside J. D. Beazley during the final stages of the First World War. As war drew to a close, Sydney Cockerell, Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, invited Lamb to be the honorary keeper of Greek antiquities. Over the next 40 years she created a prehistoric gallery, marking the university’s contribution to excavations in the Aegean, and developed the museum’s holdings of classical bronzes and Athenian figure-decorated pottery. Lamb formed a parallel career excavating in the Aegean. She was admitted as a student of the British School at Athens and served as assistant director on the Mycenae excavations under Alan Wace and Carl Blegen. After further work at Sparta and on prehistoric mounds in Macedonia, Lamb identified and excavated a major Bronze Age site at Thermi on Lesbos. She conducted a brief excavation on Chios before directing a significant project at Kusura in Turkey. She was recruited for the Turkish language section of the BBC during the Second World War, and after the cessation of hostilities took an active part in the creation of the British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara. a.

About the Author
David Gill is Professor of Archaeological Heritage at the University of Suffolk and Visiting Research Fellow in the School of History at the University of East Anglia. He is a former Rome Scholar at the British School at Rome, and Sir James Knott Fellow at Newcastle University. He was responsible for the Greek and Roman collections at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, before moving to Swansea University where he was Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Introduction
Chapter 1 - The Lamb Family and Early Years
Chapter 2 - Cambridge and Classics
Chapter 3 - The Hope Vases and Naval Intelligence
Chapter 4 - The First Year in Athens (1920–21)
Chapter 5 - Prehistory and the Fitzwilliam Museum
Chapter 6 - Mycenae, Sparta and Macedonia
Chapter 7 - The Fitzwilliam Museum: Developing the Classical Collections
Chapter 8 - The Eastern Aegean: Lesbos and Chios
Chapter 9 - Anatolia and Kusura
Chapter 10 - The War Years
Chapter 11 - The British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara
Bibliography
Index
NEW: Étude paléoanthropologique et analyse des rituels funéraires de deux sites laténiens valaisans Randogne – Bluche et Sion – Parking des Remparts by Tobias Hofstetter. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+240 pages; 171 figs + 6 tables (colour and black & white throughout). French text; English abstract. 444 2018 Laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique UNIGE . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919375. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919382. Book contents pageDownload

This volume concerns the bioanthropological analysis and the investigation of Second Iron Age (also known as the La Tène period: 470–25 BC) funerary practices in central Valais. More precisely, it deals with the study of two necropolises lately discovered in this mountainous region of southern Switzerland: Randogne–Bluche (excavated between 2001 and 2005) and Sion–Parking des Remparts (excavated in 2006). The matter of Second Iron Age funeral practices has been investigated since the late 19th century in Switzerland and has ever since yielded many exceptional finds. In archaeological terms, the research presented in this work introduces a consistent summary of the current archaeological and historiographical state of knowledge regarding Second Iron Age funeral practices in southern Switzerland.

Étude paléoanthropologique et analyse des rituels funéraires de deux sites laténiens valaisans : Randogne – Bluche et Sion – Parking des Remparts porte sur l’analyse bioanthropologique et l’étude des rituels funéraires laténiens en Valais central. Plus précisément, elle traite des ensembles funéraires de Randogne – Bluche (fouillé entre 2001 et 2005) et de Sion – Parking des Remparts (fouillé en 2006). Le premier objectif de cette étude a consisté à attribuer une identité et des caractéristiques biologiques aux individus inhumés au sein de ces deux ensembles. Ensuite, il s’est agi de caractériser ces deux ensembles funéraires par leur insertion au cadre géographique et archéologique, de s’intéresser à leur organisation chronologique et spatiale et à l’architecture des sépultures, ainsi qu’aux positions d’inhumation, de même qu’au mobilier funéraire présent. Par la suite, nous avons développé une vision comparative de ces deux ensembles funéraires, avant de finalement les confronter à l’intégralité du corpus funéraire laténien actuellement connu pour le Valais central et ainsi chercher à proposer une vision synthétique de la question.

About the Author
TOBIAS HOFSTETTER (B.A, M.Sc.) was born in Zürich in 1992. He currently works as consulting bioanthropologist to the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Bioanthropology at the University of Geneva, where he has collaborated in various archaeological fieldwork operations and bioanthropological assessments, covering the Mesolithic to the Middle Ages, in Switzerland, Italy, Bulgaria, Kuwait and Jordan.

TOBIAS HOFSTETTER (BA ; MSc) est né à Zürich (Suisse) en 1992. Il a obtenu son Bachelor en archéologie préhistorique et classique ainsi qu’en anthropologie à l’Université de Neuchâtel (Suisse) en 2013. Il a poursuivi ses études en Master d’archéologie préhistorique et bioanthropologie à l’Université de Genève (Suisse) ; formation qu’il a terminée en 2016. Il travaille couramment en tant que bioanthropologue consultant pour le laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique et d’anthropologie de l’Université de Genève. À ce titre, il a participé à de nombreuses campagnes de fouilles archéologiques et expertises bioanthropologiques, s’étendant du Paléolithique jusqu’à la période médiévale, en Suisse, France, Italie, Bulgarie, Koweït et Jordanie. En parallèle, il a repris un deuxième cursus de Master en histoire et littérature anglaise à l’Université de Neuchâtel.
NEW: The Geography of Trade: Landscapes of competition and long-distance contacts in Mesopotamia and Anatolia in the Old Assyrian Colony Period by Alessio Palmisano. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+192 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 442 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919252. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919269. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From the mid-20th century onwards, consolidated study of the merchant archives from the Old Assyrian trading colony at Kaneš (Kültepe) has not only transformed our understanding of the social, economic and political dynamics of the Bronze Age Near East, but also overturned many preconceived notions of what constitutes pre-modern trade. Despite this disciplinary impact and archaeological investigations at Kültepe and elsewhere, our understanding of this phenomenon has remained largely text-based and therefore of limited analytical scope, both spatially and contextually. This book re-assesses the Old-Assyrian trade network in Upper Mesopotamia and Central Anatolia during the Middle Bronze Age (c. 1970 – 1700 BC) by combining in some analytical detail the archaeology (e.g. material culture, settlement data, etc.) of the region both on its own terms and via a range of spatial approaches. The author offers a comparative and spatial perspective on exchange networks and economic strategies, continuity and discontinuity of specific trade circuits and routes, and the evolution of political landscapes throughout the Near East in the Middle Bronze Age.

About the Author
ALESSIO PALMISANO is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at UCL Institute of Archaeology and is currently working on a research project examining the relationship between inferred regional demographic trends in the Mediterranean since the appearance of farming and reconstructed land cover in the past. His research so far has been primarily focused on the study of Western Asian and Eastern Mediterranean early complex societies, the analysis of settlement patterns, and the development of bespoke quantitative and computational methods to Archaeology. He also took part, with roles of scientific responsibility, in several campaigns of archaeological fieldwork, primarily in Iraq, Italy, Syria, and Turkey.
NEW: New Approaches to Disease, Disability and Medicine in Medieval Europe edited by Erin Connelly and Stefanie Künzel. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+152 pages; 2 figures, 1 table (2 plates in colour). 441 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918835. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918842. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The majority of papers in this volume were originally presented at the eighth annual ‘Disease, Disability, and Medicine in Medieval Europe’ conference. The conference focused on infections, chronic illness, and the impact of infectious diseases on medieval society, including infection as a disability in the case of visible conditions, such as infected wounds, leprosy, syphilis, and tuberculosis. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this conference emphasised the importance of collaborative projects, novel avenues of research for treating infectious disease, and the value of considering medieval questions from the perspective of multiple disciplines. This volume aims to carry forward this interdisciplinary synergy by bringing together contributors from a variety of disciplines and from a diverse range of international institutions. Of note is the academic stage of the contributors in this volume. All the contributors were PhD candidates at the time of the conference, and the majority have completed or are in the final stages of completing their programmes at the time of this publication. The originality and calibre of research presented by these early career researchers demonstrates the promising future of the field, as well as the continued relevance of medieval studies for a wide range of disciplines and topics. Contributions by Stefanie Künzel, Marit Ronen, Cathrin Hähn, Rachel Welsh, Ninon Dubourg, Clara Jáuregui, Lucy Barnhouse, Cecilia Collins, Erin Connelly, and Christoph Wieselhuber.

About the Editors
ERIN CONNELLY is the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow for Data Curation in Medieval Studies in the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, University of Pennsylvania Libraries. She holds a PhD in English from the University of Nottingham with a special interest in medieval medical texts and the relevance of medieval medicine for modern infections (‘ancientbiotics’). Her doctoral project was the first edition of the 15th-century Middle English translation of Bernard of Gordon's Lilium medicinae, the Lylye of Medicynes (Bodleian Library MS Ashmole 1505). She collaborates on a wide range of interdisciplinary projects, including a ‘big data’ approach to analysing medieval medical texts and using multispectral imaging to categorise stains in medieval manuscripts.

STEFANIE KÜNZEL has recently finished her doctorate at the University of Nottingham. Her thesis explores concepts of disease in Anglo-Saxon literature and culture, focusing on metaphors pertaining primarily to the fields of infection and epidemics. She obtained her BA from the University of Bamberg in 2011 and subsequently completed an MA in Anglo-Saxon and Viking Studies at the University of Nottingham.
NEW: The Hydraulic System of Uxul Origins, functions, and social setting by Nicolaus Seefeld. Paperback; 205x290mm; xxii+518 pages, 21 folded pull-outs; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (183 colour plates). 440 2018 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919290. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919306. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Since the inception of Maya studies, the issue of water supply in Classic Maya society has been a matter of controversial debate. Due to the annually recurring dry seasons the availability of water during this period is and has always been problematic. In the light of these conditions, the fact that the pre-Hispanic Maya were able to establish, developed and maintain prosperous urban centres over long periods is hard to explain.

In order to resolve this open issue, this book aims to explain the water management strategies of the Maya in pre-Hispanic times. To this end, this volume analyses the intricate relationship between the natural environment and the adaptation strategies of the pre-Hispanic population, whose physical remains were documented in the form of hydraulic features. A large section of this book discusses the different forms, functions, and the geographic distribution of the published hydraulic features. The main body of this monograph focuses on the archaeological investigation of the hydraulic system of Uxul, a medium-sized Maya centre in the south of the state of Campeche, Mexico. As many open research questions could be addressed and studied in this site, the hydraulic system of Uxul acted as a central point of reference for the evaluation of the socio-political relevance of water management in the Maya Lowlands. This book identifies both the natural causes for water scarcities and the cultural adaptation strategies that were designed to overcome them. Due to this comprehensive approach, the present book is the most extensive and exhaustive account on the hydraulic features of the Maya Lowlands and thus enables representative statements on the sociopolitical relevance of water management in Classic Maya society.

About the Author
Nicolaus Seefeld is an archaeologist who specializes in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica with a focus on the ancient Maya. He has participated in archaeological investigations at several Maya sites in Mexico and Guatemala. Since 2008, his research has focused on the water management practices and the agricultural production of the Classic Maya. He holds an MA and a doctorate from the University of Bonn.

Note regarding the eBook version: Due to the number of illustrations and the extent of the volume the eBook has had to be compressed down to a manageable size for downloading. If you purchase the eBook version (or are entitled to a free eBook along with a print purchase) and would like the full-resolution version please email your order receipt to info@archaeopress.com and we will send the larger file via wetransfer.
FORTHCOMING: Greek Art in Motion Studies in honour of Sir John Boardman on the occasion of his 90th Birthday edited by Rui Morais, Delfim Leão, Diana Pérez with Daniela Ferreira. Paperback; iv+528pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (230 colour plates). (Print RRP £75.00). 485 2018. ISBN 9781789690231. Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication on Greek Art gathers a large number of studies presented at the International Congress ‘Greek Art in Motion’. Held in honour of Sir John Boardman’s 90th birthday, the congress took place at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, 3-5 May, 2017.

The volume first presents eight contributions by the keynote speakers who, as friends and students of Sir John, present a debate and a problematisation of Greek Art from the archaeological and historical point of view.

Thereafter, 45 papers are divided into the different themes considered during the congress, all of which have greatly benefited from Sir John's researches throughout his long and distinguished academic career: Sculpture, Architecture, Terracotta and Metal, Greek Pottery, Coins, Greek History and Archaeology, Greeks Overseas, Reception and Collecting, Art and Myth.

About the Editors
RUI MORAIS was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in History, variant of Archaeology from the University of Coimbra. He has a Masters in Urban Archaeology, PhD in Archaeology, Technology and Materials from University of Minho. He was Professor at Minho University and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Among his research, he has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH). He was a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for antiques. He is a member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project.

DELFIM LEÃO is a Professor at the Institute of Classical Studies and a researcher at the Center for Classical and Humanistic Studies, University of Coimbra. His main areas of interest are ancient history, law and political theory of the Greeks, theatrical pragmatics, and the ancient novel. He also has a strong interest in digital humanities. Among his main recent works are D. F. Leão and P. J. Rhodes, ‘The Laws of Solon. A new Edition, with Introduction, Translation and Commentary’ (London, I. B. Tauris, 2015), and a second revised edition in 2016; D. F. Leão and G. Thür (Hrsg.) ‘Symposion 2015. Vorträge zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte’ (Wien, Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2016). Along with Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta, he is the editor of Brill’s ‘Plutarch Studies’.

DIANA RODRÍGUEZ PÉREZ is a Junior Research Fellow at Mougins Museum in Classical Art and Material Culture at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and was previously the Research Assistant for the Beazley Archive Pottery Database at the Classical Art Research Centre. Before moving to Oxford, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Edinburgh (FECYT). She received a PhD (Doctor Europaea) from the University of León, Spain (The Snake in the Ancient Greek World: Myth, Rite and Image), an MPhil in History of Art from the University of León, and an MPhil in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. From 2010 to 2011 she worked as a translator at the European Parliament in Luxemburg, and was a DAAD Fellow at the Institut für klassische Archäologie of the University of Heidelberg from 2008 to 2009. In the summer of 2017 she was Tytus Scholar at the Department of Classical Studies of the University of Cincinnati (US).

DANIELA FERREIRA is currently a PhD student at the Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archeology of Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, and a researcher at UI&D CITCEM - Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory», Portugal. She is also a recipient of a FCT (Portuguese national funding agency for science, research and technology) grant since 2015. Daniela holds a Master’s degree in Archaeology from the University of Oporto (Portugal), with a focus
FORTHCOMING: Popular Religion and Ritual in prehistoric and ancient Greece and the eastern Mediterranean edited by Giorgos Vavouranakis, Konstantinos Kopanias and Chrysanthos Kanellopoulos. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+170 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (30 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 481 2018. ISBN 9781789690453. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume features a group of select peer-reviewed papers by an international group of authors, both younger and senior academics and researchers. It has its origins in a conference held at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, which aimed to bring up the frequently-neglected popular cult and other ritual practices in prehistoric and ancient Greece and the eastern Mediterranean. The topics covered by the chapters of the volume include the interplay between elite and popular ritual at cemeteries and peak sanctuaries just before and right after the establishment of the first palaces in Minoan Crete; the use of conical cups in Minoan ritual; the wide sharing of religious and other metaphysical beliefs as expressed in the wall-paintings of Akrotiri on the island of Thera; the significance of open-air sanctuaries, figurines and other informal cult and ritual paraphernalia in the Aegean, Cyprus and the Levant from the late bronze age to the archaic period; the role of figurines and caves in popular cult in the classical period; the practice of cursing in ancient Athens; and the popular element of sports games in ancient Greece.

About the Editors GIORGOS VAVOURANAKIS is Assistant Professor in Prehistoric Aegean: Theoretical Archaeology at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied at the same university and did his MA and PhD at the University of Sheffield. He has worked as a contract archaeologist for the Hellenic Ministry of Culture, as a post-doctoral researcher at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and as adjunct faculty at the Universities of Crete and the Peloponnese, and the Hellenic Open University. His research interests include archaeological theory, especially landscape archaeology and funerary archaeology, but also the history of archaeological research. He has directed field projects in Cyprus and Crete and is currently the deputy director of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens excavation at Marathon.

KONSTANTINOS KOPANIAS is Assistant Professor of Ancient Civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied at the same university and also at the Paris-Lodron University of Salzburg and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. He has worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Athens, as adjunct faculty at the University of Crete and as Allgemeiner Referent at the German Archaeological Institute in Athens. Since 2011 he has been the director of the University of Athens excavaton in Tell Nader and Tell Baqrta in the Kurdistan Region in Iraq.

CHRYSANTHOS KANELLOPOULOS is an archaeologist specializing in classical architecture. He is Assistant Professor at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He was employed for a number of years as a historical architect at the American Center of Oriental Research in Amman, Jordan, where he worked on the buildings of both Amman and Petra. His PhD thesis treated the classical and Hellenistic phases of ancient Karthaia on the island of Kea. He is the author of Amman: The Great Temple (Amman 1996) and the Late Roman Temenos Wall at Epidauros (Athens 1999), co-author of the Petra Church (Amman 2001), The Thymele at Epidauros (Fargo 2017) and The North Ridge in Petra (Amman 2018). During recent years, Dr Kanellopoulos’ work has focussed on the architecture of the Library of Hadrian in Athens and of the temple of Zeus Basileus in Levadeia.
FORTHCOMING: Loaves, beds, plants and Osiris: Considerations about the emergence of the Cult of Osiris by Leo Roeten. Paperback; 175x245mm; xxx+220 pages; 117 figures, 13 tables (black & white throughout). (Print RRP £34.00). 479 2018 Archaeopress Egyptology 21. ISBN 9781784919665. Book contents pageBuy Now

The emergence of the cult of Osiris is, in most cases, dated to the end of the 5th dynasty, the period in which the name of Osiris appears in writing, and it is commonly held that before this period not a trace of the cult can be discerned.

This study is intended to investigate whether this emergence was really so sudden, or if there is evidence to suggest this appearance was preceded by a period of development of the theology and mythology of the cult.

One of the most important aspects of the mythology of the cult is the rebirth of Osiris. In the theology of the cult this rebirth was projected on mortal men, and led to the postulation that every human being, whether royal or non-royal, had the possibility to attain eternal life after death. What made this cult even more attractive is that this eternal life was not confined to the tomb, as it used to be for non-royalty.

The study is concerned with the rebirth possibilities of non-royal persons and aims to determine the chronological development of the rebirth connotations of the various decoration themes that were used in the chapel of Old Kingdom tombs. The decoration themes that are the subject of the determinations are the group of bed-scenes consisting of the bed-making scene and the marital bed-scene, the development in form and length of the bread loaves on the offering table, the different aspects of the scenes in which the “lotus” flower is depicted, and the marsh scenes.

About the Author
LEO ROETEN obtained a Masters degree in biochemistry and plant physiology in 1972. After a career in this field Leo studied Egyptology at the University of Leiden and in 2011 wrote a dissertation called ‘The certainty of change. A research into the interactions of the decoration on the western wall of the cult chapels of the mastabas at Giza during the Old Kingdom’. From then on he has been active as an independent researcher specialised in the Old Kingdom tombs in the Memphite necropoleis. This research has led to a number of articles and to publication of two books (‘The decoration of the cult chapel walls of the Old Kingdom at Giza’ (2014) and ‘Chronological developments in the Old Kingdom tombs in the necropoleis of Giza, Saqqara and Abusir’ (2016).
FORTHCOMING: Bronze Age Metalwork Techniques and traditions in the Nordic Bronze Age 1500-1100 BC by Heide W. Nørgaard. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+502 pages; 290 figures (244 plates in colour). 474 2018. ISBN 9781789690194. Book contents pageBuy Now

Bronze ornaments of the Nordic Bronze Age (neck collars, belt plates, pins and tutuli) were elaborate objects that served as status symbols to communicate social hierarchy. The magnificent metalwork studied here dates from 1500-1100 BC. An interdisciplinary investigation of the artefacts was adopted to elucidate their manufacture and origin, resulting in new insights into metal craft in northern Europe during the Bronze Age. Based on the habitus concept, which situates the craftsmen within their social and technological framework, individual artefact characteristics and metalworking techniques can be used to identify different craft practices, even to identify individual craftsmen. The conclusions drawn from this offer new insights into the complex organisation of metalcraft in the production of prestige goods across different workshops. Several kinship-based workshops on Jutland, in the Lüneburg Heath and Mecklenburg, allow us to conclude that the bronze objects were a display of social status and hierarchy controlled by, and produced for, the elite – as is also seen in the workshops on Zealand. Within the two main metalworking regions, Zealand and central Lower Saxony, workshops can be defined as communities of practice that existed with an extended market and relations with the local elite. Attached craft, in the sense that the craftspeople fully depended on a governing institution and produced artefacts as a manifestation of political expression, was only detected on Zealand between 1500-1300 BC.

The investigation presented here showed that overall results could not be achieved when concentrating only on one aspect of metalwork. Highly skilled craft is to be found in every kind of workshop, as well as an intensive labour input. Only when considering skill in relation to labour input and also taking into account signs of apprenticeship and cross-craft techniques, as well as the different categories of mistakes in crafting, can a stable image of craft organisation be created.

About the Author
HEIDE W. NØRGAARD is a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, where she graduated and received her PhD in 2014. With the background as an educated goldsmith, she is working with metal artefacts trying to solve craft technical problems from the Bronze to the early Iron Ages in Northern Europe. Heide W. Nørgaard is currently working on reconstructing the earliest metal trading routes towards Scandinavia, based on over 500 lead isotope analysis of the first half of the 2nd millennium BC.
FORTHCOMING: Rural Cult Centres in the Hauran as Part of a Broader Network of the Near East (100 BC–AD 300) by Francesca Mazzilli. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+208 pages; 43 figures, 3 maps, 5 tables (3 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 464 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781784919542. Book contents pageBuy Now

The book challenges earlier scholars’ emphasis on the role played by local identities and Romanisation in religion and religious architecture in the Roman Empire through the first comprehensive multidisciplinary analysis of rural cult centres in the Hauran (southern Syria) from the pre-Roman to the Roman period (100 BC-AD 300). The Hauran is an interesting and revealing object of study because it has been a geographical crossroads between different cultures over time. Inspired by recent theories on interconnectivity and globalisation, the monograph argues that cult centres and the Hauran itself are part of a human network at a macro level on the basis of the analysis of archaeological, architectural, sculptural and epigraphic evidence and landscape. As a result of this multi-disciplinary approach, the author also re-assesses the social meaning of these sanctuaries, discusses the identity of the elite group that contributed financially to the building of sanctuaries, and attempts to reconstruct ritual and economic activities in cult centres. This work re-evaluates the significance of contacts between the elite of the Hauran and other cultures of the Near East in shaping cult sites, and it includes the first catalogue of rural cult centres of the Hauran (in the appendix).

About the Author
DR FRANCESCA MAZZILLI has been a Roman pottery specialist for the Cambridge Archaeological Unit at the University of Cambridge since March 2015. She holds a PhD in Archaeology from the University of Durham for her thesis Beyond Religion: Cultural Exchange and Economy in Syria. Over the last ten years she has worked as an archaeologist in England, Italy and Jordan. Her main research interests are Roman religion, architecture, landscape, theory and pottery. She has presented papers covering these topics in various international conferences in Europe. Together with Dies Van Der Linde she is currently co-editing the book titled Dialectics of Religion in the Roman World. She has been a member of Theoretical Roman Archaeological Conference (TRAC) standing committee and of the Theoretical Roman Archaeological Journal (TRAJ) editorial team since March 2017.