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NEW: Definición y caracterización de las cerámicas a mano con decoración pintada del sur de la península ibérica en época tartésica by Pedro Miguel Naranjo. Paperback; 203x276mm; 476 page; 136 figures; illustrated catalogue consisting of 99 colour plates. Spanish text. 682 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697728. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697735. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Handmade ceramics with painted decoration constitute one of the most outstanding archaeological materials from the Late Bronze Age and the First Iron Age in the Guadalquivir and Guadiana valleys, the context in which the Tartessian culture developed. In this work, an exhaustive study of these ceramic styles has been attempted, defining their technical characteristics, dispersion, forms, decoration, symbolism, chronology, use and meaning. To this overall study are added several unpublished pieces by Alarcos, some with archeometric and content analysis, the results of which allow questioning their traditional consideration as 'post-firing ceramics'.

This characterization allows an orientation in the classification of some styles traditionally considered as a monolithic set when really, there is a much more complex panorama due to different chronological and cultural circumstances. Among the latter, the relationships and contacts established between local communities and Mediterranean populations stand out, giving rise to cultural phenomena of miscegenation or hybridization in which local tradition was combined with all exogenous contributions, a fossilized reality in these productions. This book presents the most complete and up-to-date work on these ceramics, studied from the perspective of new theoretical-methodological approaches and recent interpretations.

About the Author
Pedro Miguel Naranjo has a degree in History (Extraordinary Award) and a doctorate in Prehistory from the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM). He completed a master's degree in History and Ancient Sciences (UCM-UAM), specializing in oriental cultures. His research focuses on the Protohistory of the Iberian Peninsula, specifically the Phoenicians, Tartessians and Greeks.

Spanish Description
Las cerámicas a mano con decoración pintada constituyen uno de los materiales arqueológicos más destacados del Bronce Final y de la Primera Edad del Hierro en los valles del Guadalquivir y del Guadiana, contexto en el que se desarrolló la cultura tartésica. En este trabajo se ha abordado un estudio exhaustivo sobre estos estilos cerámicos, definiendo sus características técnicas, dispersión geográfica, formas, decoración, simbolismo, cronología, uso y significado. A este estudio de conjunto se añaden varias piezas inéditas de Alarcos, algunas con análisis arqueométricos y de contenido cuyos resultados cuestionan su tradicional consideración como “cerámicas postcocción”.

Dicha caracterización permite una orientación en la clasificación de unos estilos tradicionalmente considerados como un conjunto monolítico, cuando realmente subyace un panorama mucho más complejo que obedece a diversas circunstancias cronológicas y culturales. Entre estas últimas destacan las relaciones y contactos establecidos entre las comunidades locales peninsulares y las poblaciones mediterráneas, dando lugar a fenómenos culturales de mestizaje o hibridación en el que se conjugó la tradición local con todas las aportaciones exógenas, una realidad fosilizada en estas producciones. En definitiva, se trata de la obra de conjunto más completa y actualizada sobre estas cerámicas, estudiadas desde la perspectiva de los nuevos enfoques teórico-metodológicos y las recientes interpretaciones.

Pedro Miguel Naranjo es graduado en Historia (premio Extraordinario Fin de Carrera) y doctor en Prehistoria por la Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM). Realizó el máster en Historia y Ciencias de la Antigüedad (UCM-UAM), con especialidad en culturas orientales. Sus investigaciones se centran en la Protohistoria de la península ibérica, concretamente fenicios, tartesios y griegos.
NEW: Die Bestattungsgruben in Bat by Conrad Schmidt, with contributions by Stefan Giese und Christian Hübner and Steve Zäuner. Hardback; 210x297mm; 374pp; 250 figures; 187 tables (97 pages of colour). German text. 680 2020 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697391. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697858. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Volume 1 of the series Arabia Orientalis presents the first comprehensive study of two Umm an-Nar (2700—2000 BC) burial pits from the UNESCO World Heritage site Bat in the Sultanate of Oman. They were excavated between 2010 and 2012 by the University of Tübingen. Each burial pit represents one of the largest closed finds of the Early Bronze Age in the region. Finds largely include beads and other items of personal adornment, as well as pottery and human bones. Detailed typologies of all objects are the basis for in-depth statistical analyses of the different categories of finds and the reconstruction of burial customs at Bat. Furthermore, imports and imitations from other regions including the Indus Valley, Iran, and Mesopotamia illuminate Bat’s foreign relations and integration into the interregional exchange and communication system. The interpretation of the unearthed human remains conducted by Steve Zauner offer, not only the number of individuals, sex, and age of the deceased, but also insights into lifestyle, diseases, and stress of the people in the past.

German description
Die Umm an-Nar-Zeit (2700–2000 v. Chr.) auf der östlichen Arabischen Halbinsel gilt als Periode tiefgreifender Veränderungen in der ökonomischen und sozialen Organisation der Gesellschaft sowie der Ausbeutung von Ressourcen. Einer der größten und bedeutendsten Fundplätze dieser Zeit im Sultanat Oman ist der seit 1988 auf der Welterbeliste der UNESCO stehende Fundort Bat in der Provinz Al-Dhahirah. Von 2010 bis 2015 führte die Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen ein Projekt zur Erforschung der Entwicklung der beiden Nekropolen von Bat und Al-Ayn sowie der Siedlung von Al-Zebah durch. Im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchungen stand die Frage nach den Gründen und Ursachen des sozioökonomischen Umbruchs im 3. Jahrtausend v. Chr. und wie sich dieser in den Lebensverhältnissen der damaligen Bevölkerung widerspiegelt.

Die vorliegende Publikation stellt den ersten Band der Endberichte des Forschungsprojekts des Instituts für die Kulturen des Alten Orients der Universität Tübingen in Bat, Al-Zebah und Al- Ayn dar. Das Werk beinhaltet die vollständige Auswertung der beiden Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Bestattungsgruben A-Inst. 0006 und A-Inst. 0025 in Bat einschließlich anthropologischer Analysen und einer geophysikalischen Prospektion in der Nekropole von Bat. Beide Gruben zählen zu den größten jemals im Oman untersuchten geschlossenen Fundkontexten der frühen Bronzezeit. Zur Publikation gehört ein online unter https://tinyurl. com/9781789697391-der-fundekatalog publizierter Katalog, der sämtliche Einzelnachweise zu den Funden aus den beiden Bestattungsgruben enthält.
NEW: An Educator's Handbook for Teaching about the Ancient World edited by Pınar Durgun. Paperback; 156x234mm; 248 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 670 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697605. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697612. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

With the right methods, studying the ancient world can be as engaging as it is informative. Many K-12 teachers, university instructors, and museum educators use hands-on, project-based, and experiential activities in their classes to increase student engagement and learning. This book aims to bring together such pedagogical methods and teaching activities about the ancient world for any educator to use. The teaching activities in this book are designed in a cookbook format so that educators can replicate these teaching "recipes” (which include materials, budget, preparation time, levels of students) in their ancient art, archaeology, social studies, and history classes. They can be implemented online or in-person, in schools, universities, libraries, museums, or at home. Find out more about the book and the contributors here.

About the Editor
Pınar Durgun is an art historically-trained archaeologist with a background in anthropology, cultural heritage, and museums, passionate about outreach and education. She received her Ph.D. from Brown University and has been teaching for about a decade in universities, museums, and school classrooms about archaeology and the ancient world. As a dedicated public scholar and educator, Dr. Durgun hopes to make academic information about the ancient world accessible, fun, and inclusive.
NEW: Public Archaeologies of Frontiers and Borderlands edited by Kieran Gleave, Howard Williams and Pauline Clarke. Paperback; 203x276mm; 270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 126 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698015. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698022. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

From IndyRef and Brexit to the Refugee Crisis and Trump’s Wall, the construction and maintenance, subversion and traversing of frontiers and borderlands dominate our current affairs. Yet, while archaeologists have long participated in exploring frontiers and borderlands, their public archaeology has been starkly neglected. Incorporating the select proceedings of the 4th University of Chester Archaeology Student conference hosted by the Grosvenor Museum, Chester, on 20 March 2019, this is the first book to investigate realworld ancient and modern frontier works, the significance of graffiti, material culture, monuments and wall-building, as well as fictional representations of borders and walls in the arts, as public archaeology. Key themes include the heritage interpretation for linear monuments, public archaeology in past and contemporary frontiers and borderlands, and archaeology’s interactions with mural practices in politics, popular culture and the contemporary landscape. Together, the contributors show the necessity of developing critical public archaeologies of frontiers and borderlands.

About the Editors
Kieran Gleave is currently an archaeologist with the University of Salford. He graduated from the University of Chester in 2019 after graduating with a BA (Hons) Archaeology degree. ;

Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches public archaeology and archaeologies of death and memory. He writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath. ;

Pauline Magdalene Clarke is a postgraduate researcher at the University of Chester, having recently completed both her BA (Hons) and MA there. She has a particular interest in material culture, and how it can demonstrate change (or not) in borderlands in the Anglo-Saxon period. She has recently published a review of the PAS finds from Cheshire for that period.
NEW: El Palacio: Historiography and new perspectives on a pre-Tarascan city of northern Michoacán, Mexico edited by Marion Forest. Paperback; 203x276mm; 314 pages; 143 figures, 52 tables; papers in English and Spanish. 125 2020 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 53. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697964. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697971. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

In the centuries that preceded the European conquest in 1521, the central-northern region of the state of Michoacán, West Mexico, was a place of significant socio-political changes materialized by important transformations of settlement pattern and material culture. The archaeological site of El Palacio (also known as La Crucita or Mich. 23), located in the Zacapu Basin, constituted a major center throughout these regional events. The site has been mentioned in the archaeological literature as early as the end of the nineteenth century, and dispersed subsequent research has documented changes in site morphology, function, and degree of integration into interregional networks of cultural interaction. The present volume offers the first monographic publication about El Palacio. It is composed of a series of eleven contributions looking at both legacy and archive data (1896–1995) and results derived from recent archaeological investigations (2012–2017). The systematic review and analysis of the chrono-stratigraphy, material culture, urbanism, and economic and ritual practices at the site yields critical information that allows discussion of the role of El Palacio and the context of its development at both local and extra-local scales, between A.D. 850 and 1521. Beyond this central concern, this volume provides extended material for cultural comparisons with West, Northwest and Central Mexico during this time period, as well as for broader discussions about the complex social mechanisms involved in the rise, transformation, and fall of premodern urban centers.

About the Editor
Marion Forest received her PhD in archaeology from the University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Anthropology of Brigham Young University. She specializes in urbanization processes in western and central Mexico. Her current research includes a survey and excavation field project at Teotihuacan and further developments in the integration of LiDAR data in archaeology.

Spanish Description
En los siglos que precedieron a la conquista española de 1521, la región centro-norte del estado de Michoacán, occidente de México, fue el escenario de cambios sociopolíticos importantes, materializados a través de transformaciones significativas en el patrón de asentamiento y la cultura material a escala regional. El sitio arqueológico de El Palacio (también conocido como La Crucita o Mich. 23), localizado en la cuenca de Zacapu, constituye un centro mayor que fue ocupado entre 850 y 1521 d. C y transformado de manera continua a lo largo de su historia ocupacional. El Palacio atrajo la atención de diversos investigadores desde finales del siglo diecinueve y fue sujeto a investigaciones subsecuentes. Si bien las intervenciones en el sitio fueron dispersas, éstas permitieron documentar ciertos cambios en la morfología del asentamiento, su función, y su grado de integración en las redes de interacción culturales a larga distancia. El presente volumen constituye la primera publicación monográfica sobre El Palacio. Se compone de once contribuciones enfocadas tanto en la reevaluación de la información existente del sitio (obtenida entre los años 1896 y 1995) como en el estudio de los datos adquiridos durante las investigaciones recientes (de 2012 a 2017). La revisión y análisis sistemático de la cronoestratigrafía, la cultura material, el urbanismo, y las prácticas rituales y económicas que caracterizan la ocupación prehispánica del sitio, produjeron una documentación que permite discutir el papel de El Palacio y su contexto de desarrollo en una escala local y regional. El presente volumen ofrece, asimismo, un contenido con material extensivo útil para ser retomado en estudios comparativos, sobre todo con respecto a las regiones Oeste, Noroeste y Central de México durante los periodos Epiclásico y Postclásico. Finalmente esta obra contribuye a generar una reflexión en tor
NEW: Architecture militaire du Deccan: Une réponse défensive face à la guerre moderne Deccan Military Architecture: A response to early modern warfare by Nicolas Morelle. Paperback; 203x276mm; 428pp; 168 figures. French text with English introduction and conclusion. 124 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697445. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697452. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Architecture militaire du Deccan focuses on the Deccan region in central India between the medieval and modern period, a period at the interface between local Indian culture and the Persian world, followed by relations with the colonial enterprise European in Asia. This period was marked by many conflicts, but also by an inventive adaptation of new military technologies in response to new forms of modern warfare in India, with the arrival of artillery.

Using the most recent investigative techniques, such as photogrammetry and 3D modeling, this volume presents a wealth of new data. The author’s meticulous approach encompasses the study of urban maps, architectural plans and detailed descriptions of walls, bastions, moats, towers, gates, horsemen, granaries, hydraulic éléments, and more.

Through the study of four representative fortified sites, the author synthesizes the evolution of the military architecture of the Deccan.

One can only hope that this volume will inspire other scholars to work on other Indian fortified sites, not limited to the Deccan. Thus, a more complete understanding of the phases of evolution of Indian military architecture can emerge.

About the Author
Nicolas Morelle is an archaeologist, specialising in India (associated researcher of LA3M CNRS in France). After studies on crusaders fortifications and influences between East and West in terms of building techniques and military Architecture, he studied technical interactions in Indian fortifications as part of his PhD thesis on the evolution of Military Architecture in the four Deccan forts. In this context, he collaborated with many Indian and international institutions.

French description: L’extraordinaire conservatoire de fortifications que constitue l’Inde centrale enrichit la connaissance de l’architecture militaire de la période moderne. Les spécificités indiennes en matière de défense constituent un apport non négligeable sur le développement original des organes défensifs du Deccan.

En utilisant les techniques d’investigation les plus récentes, telles que la photogrammétrie et la modélisation 3D, Nicolas Morelle découvre une richesse de données jusqu’alors inconnues. Il présente ainsi une approche méticuleuse à travers des cartes urbaines, des plans d’architecture et des descriptions détaillées de murs, bastions, douves, tours, portes, cavaliers, greniers, éléments hydrauliques, …

Dans ce volume, Nicolas Morelle se concentre sur la région du Deccan dans le centre de l’Inde entre la période médiévale et moderne, période à l’interface entre la culture indienne locale et le monde persan, suivi des relations avec l’entreprise coloniale européenne en Asie. Cette période a été marquée par de nombreux conflits, mais aussi par une adaptation inventive, de nouvelles technologies militaires en réponse aux nouvelles formes de guerre moderne en Inde, avec l’arrivée de l’artillerie.

A travers l’étude de quatre sites fortifiés représentatifs, l’auteur élabore une synthèse de l’évolution de l’architecture militaire du Deccan.

On ne peut qu’espérer que le présent volume inspirera d’autres chercheurs à travailler sur d’autres sites fortifiés indiens, sans se limiter au Deccan. Ainsi, une compréhension plus complète des phases d’évolution de l’architecture militaire indienne pourra émerger.

Tiré d’une recherche doctorale récente, cet ouvrage est en français. Plusieurs parties sont traduites en anglais, dont la synthèse, afin d’améliorer sa diffusion vers le public international.

Nicolas Morelle est archéologue, spécialiste de l’Inde (chercheur associé du LA3M CNRS en France). Après des études sur les fortifications des croisades et les influences entre Orient et Occident dans l’architecture militaire, il a étudié les interactions techniques dans les fortifications indiennes dans le cadre de sa thèse de doctorat sur
NEW: Nel regno del fango: speleoarcheologia della Grotta di Polla (Salerno, Italia) Risultati delle prime campagne di scavo edited by Antonella Minelli and Sandra Guglielmi. Paperback; 203x276mm; 114 pages; 61 figures, colour throughout. Italian text. 123 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691221. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691238. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Nel regno del fango presents the preliminary results of the archaeological excavations recently carried out in the Grotta di Polla, in the province of Salerno, in the Vallo di Diano area. Speleoarchaeological researches in recent years have revealed the considerable difficulty of operating methodologically in an environment, such as that of a cave which, in addition to being often characterized by the limitations caused by the darkness and tightness of the environments, has in this case led to the presence of a considerable amount of mud which made researches even more complex. The methodologies adopted for the preservation and conservation of archaeological materials and the results obtained are therefore illustrated. From an interpretative point of view, the cave is configured as an area that has been exploited with a certain continuity from the Neolithic to the whole Bronze Age with the specific function of a burial area.

About the Editors
Antonella Minelli is an academic researcher in the scientific field of Evolutionary Anthropology (BIO/08), at the Department of Humanities, Social and Formation Sciences of the University of Molise. ;

Sandra Guglielmi is a researcher in Physical Anthropology (BIO/08), at the Department of Humanities, Social and Formation Sciences of the University of Molise.

Italian Description
Il volume presenta i risultati preliminari degli scavi archeologici effettuati nella Grotta di Polla, ubicata in provincia di Salerno, nel territorio del Vallo di Diano, in Italia meridionale.

La grotta si configura come un’area sfruttata con una certa continuità, dal Neolitico finale a tutta l’Età del Bronzo, con la specifica funzione di area sepolcrale. Le informazioni acquisite nel corso delle ricerche e degli studi di natura archeostratigrafica, paleobiologica, archeobotanica, hanno permesso di tracciare un quadro significativo ed esaustivo delle modalità di sfruttamento del contesto ipogeico, inserendosi a pieno nei modelli comportamentali noti, per il periodo considerato, in Italia centro-meridionale.

Nel volume sono illustrate le metodologie adottate per la preservazione e la conservazione dei materiali archeologici. I risultati ottenuti sono - dunque - di un certo rilevo nonostante la notevole difficoltà di operare metodologicamente in un ambiente, come quello di grotta che, oltre a dover fare i conti con i limiti dovuti all’oscurità e all’ampiezza degli ambienti, è caratterizzato in questo caso da una considerevole quantità di fango, che ha reso le ricerche ancora più complesse.

Antonella Minelli è ricercatore confermato nel settore scientifico disciplinare di Antropologia, presso il Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Sociali e della Formazione dell’Università degli Studi del Molise. Ha lavorato come responsabile scientifico in contesti pre-protostorici in grotta e in open-air site in Italia e in Europa ed è stata direttore e collaboratore scientifico delle missioni archeologiche finanziate dal Ministero degli Affari Esteri italiano in Colombia e Paraguay. È autrice di diverse pubblicazioni. ;

Sandra Guglielmi è ricercatore a tempo determinato in Antropologia Fisica, presso il Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Sociali e della Formazione dell’Università degli Studi del Molise. L’area disciplinare della sua attività di ricerca è l’Antropologia Fisica e Biomolecolare applicata ai campioni archeologici. Ha svolto attività scientifica in diversi ambiti archeologici, da contesti protostorici a contesti storici, in Italia e in Sud America. È autrice di diverse pubblicazioni.
NEW: Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest edited by Federica Boschi, Enrico Giorgi, Frank Vermeulen. Paperback; 203x276mm, 230 pages; 96 figures (colour throughout). 121 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696998. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697001. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest: Landscape Archaeology and Material Culture is a coherent collection of papers presented at an International Workshop held in Ravenna (Italy) on 13-14 May 2019. The event, organized by the Universities of Bologna and Ghent and Arcadria, focussed on the transition between Italic culture and Romanised society in the central Adriatic area – the regions ager Gallicus and Picenum under Roman dominance – from the fourth to the second centuries BCE.

By bringing together the experience of international research on this topic, the volume highlights a period that marks a profound transformation in the whole of central Italy by analysing the relationships between the central settlements and their territories and, more generally, by measuring the impact of early Romanization on the territorial structure, social organization and cultural substrata of populations living here. The volume also discusses methodological aspects regarding best practices in fieldwork, landscape investigation and study of material culture, identifying research lines and perspectives for the future deepening of knowledge in this crucial period of central Adriatic archaeology.

About the Editors
Federica Boschi is senior researcher in Methods of Archaeological Research at the University of Bologna. She specialises in non-destructive methods of investigation, in particular geophysics and aerial photography for archaeology. She directs field projects in central Adriatic Italy and is a member of several teams conducting research of international significance. ;

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor of Methodology and Landscape Archaeology at the University of Bologna. He is the director of the journal ‘Groma: Documenting Archaeology’ and directs research on Adriatic archaeology. He conducts archaeological missions in Croatia, Albania and Egypt which are already the subject of publications. ;

Frank Vermeulen has been Professor of Roman Archaeology and Archaeological Methodology at Ghent University since 1999 and directed its Department of Archaeology from 2015-2018. He is particularly interested in Roman settlement archaeology and geo-archaeological approaches to ancient Mediterranean landscapes; he has a keen interest in IT applications in archaeology.
NEW: Ages and Abilities: The Stages of Childhood and their Social Recognition in Prehistoric Europe and Beyond edited by Katharina Rebay-Salisbury and Doris Pany-Kucera. Paperback; 176x252mm; 264 pages; illustrated throughout. 681 2020 Childhood in the Past Monograph Series 9. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697681. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697698. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ages and Abilities explores social responses to childhood stages from the late Neolithic to Classical Antiquity in Central Europe and the Mediterranean and includes cross-cultural comparison to expand the theoretical and methodological framework. By comparing osteological and archaeological evidence, as well as integrating images and texts, authors consider whether childhood age classes are archaeologically recognizable, at which approximated ages transitions took place, whether they are gradual or abrupt and different for girls and boys. Age transitions may be marked by celebrations and rituals; cultural accentuation of developmental stages may be reflected by inclusion or exclusion at cemeteries, by objects associated with childhood such as feeding vessels and toys, and gradual access to adult material culture. Access to tools, weapons and status symbols, as well as children’s agency, rank and social status, are recurrent themes. The volume accounts for the variability in how a range of chronologically and geographically diverse communities perceived children and childhood, and at the same time, discloses universal trends in child development in the (pre-)historic past.

About the Editors
Katharina Rebay-Salisbury is an archaeologist with a research focus on the European Bronze and Iron Ages. She directs the research group ‘Prehistoric Identities’ at the Institute for Oriental and European Archaeology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and teaches at the University of Vienna. ;

Doris Pany-Kucera studied biological anthropology at the University of Vienna, focusing on muscle marks and joint changes on skeletal remains to reconstruct occupational stress and labour patterns (PhD 2015). She teaches at the Universities of Vienna and Pilsen.
NEW: Networks and Monumentality in the Pacific Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 7 Session XXXVIII edited by Aymeric Hermann, Frédérique Valentin, Christophe Sand, Emilie Nolet. Paperback; 205x290mm; 104 pages; illutsrated throughout. 678 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697155. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697162. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Sessions XXXVIII-1,2 of UISPP 2018 in Paris were dedicated to monumental constructions and to complex exchange networks in the Pacific. Both topics have been extensively commented on and described by indigenous experts, explorers, missionaries, and scholars over the last two centuries, however these have been made famous only for the most impressive examples such as the moai statues of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) or the kula exchange system of the Trobriand Islands. Some of the latest research on these key aspects of Pacific islands societies are made available in this volume to researchers focusing on the region, but also to a more global scientific community and to the general public. The volume reflects the tremendous progress made in Pacific island archaeology in the last 60 years which has considerably advanced our knowledge of early Pacific island societies, the rise of traditional cultural systems, and their later historical developments from European contact onwards. Interdisciplinarity is particularly stimulating in the Pacific region, where the study of the archaeological record and of chronological sequences are often combined with other kinds of information such as ethnohistorical accounts, oral traditions, and linguistic reconstructions, in the French tradition of ethnoarchéologie and the American tradition of historical anthropology.

About the Editors
Aymeric Hermann is a post-doctoral researcher at the Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Since 2010, he has directed archaeological projects in several archipelagos of French Polynesia as well as in central Vanuatu. ;

Frédérique Valentin is a researcher in Oceanic archaeology at CNRS (UMR 7041, MSH Mondes, Nanterre, France). She specialises in funerary archaeology and biological anthropology. ;

Christophe Sand is Head Archaeologist for the New Caledonia Government at the IRD Research Centre in Nouméa, working on Southern Melanesia, Western Polynesia and Western Micronesia. ;

Emilie Nolet is an Assistant Professor in Archaeology at the University Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne.
NEW: El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico 20 años de excavaciones arqueológicas en el Sector III by Mª del Rosario García Huerta, Francisco Javier Morales Hervás and David Rodríguez González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 160 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 671 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696912. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696929. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico presents the results of archaeological work which has been carried out since 1997 in so-called Sector III of the Alarcos site, located on a hill next to the Guadiana river, a few kilometres from Ciudad Real. These archaeological campaigns have made it possible to obtain essential information to understand the communities that, from the end of the Bronze Age to the end of the Iron Age, inhabited this large town and its surrounding area.

An interesting set of structures and other evidence of material culture have been recovered, which allow us to characterize the daily activities of people between the 10th-11th century BC and, in addition, they enable us to understand the paleoenvironment of this territory and the nature of the economy and the food transformation activities of these protohistoric populations.

The use of this territory has been determined over the centuries, being originally a residential area which later, in Iberian times, assumed economic functionality, as it was intended for grain storage, grinding and cooking food.

The documentation of a wide and varied repertoire of ceramic materials and an interesting set of foreign ceramics corroborates the dynamism this settlement achieved, during both the Pre-Iberian period and the full Iberian period.

About the Authors
Mª del Rosario García Huerta holds a PhD in Prehistory and is Senior Lecturer on this subject at the University of Castilla-La Mancha. ;

Francisco Javier Morales Hervás was awarded an extraordinary prize during his bachelor's degree and holds a PhD in History from the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he is Associate Lecturer in Prehistory. ;

. David Rodríguez González is Lecturer in Prehistory at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he also coordinates the Degree in History and is a member of the Governing Council. ;

Spanish Description
El objeto de este libro es dar a conocer los trabajos de investigación arqueológica que desde 1997 se han realizado en el denominado Sector III del yacimiento de Alarcos, ubicado en un cerro situado junto al río Guadiana, a pocos kilómetros de Ciudad Real. Estas campañas arqueológicas han permitido obtener una información esencial para poder conocer a las comunidades que, desde finales de la Edad del Bronce hasta finales de la Edad del Hierro, habitaron este gran poblado y su área circundante.

Se ha logrado recuperar un interesante conjunto de estructuras y otras evidencias de la cultura material, que permiten caracterizar las actividades cotidianas que desempeñaban estas personas entre el siglo X a.C. y el II a.C. y, además, nos posibilitan realizar una aproximación al paleoambiente de este territorio y a las características de la economía y de las actividades de transformación de alimentos de estas poblaciones protohistóricas.

Se ha determinado su uso a lo largo de los siglos, siendo en origen un área residencial que posteriormente, en época ibérica, asumió una funcionalidad económica al estar destinada al almacenamiento de grano, a molienda y cocción de alimentos.

La documentación de un amplio y variado repertorio de materiales cerámicos y de un interesante conjunto de cerámicas foráneas corrobora el dinamismo que alcanzará este asentamiento, tanto en época Preibérica como durante el Ibérico pleno.

Mª del Rosario García Huerta es doctora en Prehistoria y profesora titular de esta materia en la Universidad de Castilla- La Mancha. Sus líneas de investigación se han centrado en las culturas protohistóricas de la península ibérica, celtibérica e ibérica y, más recientemente, ha iniciado el estudio del simbolismo animal en la Prehistoria. Es investigadora principal de numerosos proyectos de investigación arqueológicos y autora de un gran número de libros
NEW: The Global Connections of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Third International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 18th-19th March, 2019 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696950; Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout. 669 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696950. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696967. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Gandhāran art is often regarded as the epitome of cultural exchange in antiquity. The ancient region of Gandhāra, centred on what is now the northern tip of Pakistan, has been called the ‘crossroads of Asia’. The Buddhist art produced in and around this area in the first few centuries AD exhibits extraordinary connections with other traditions across Asia and as far as the Mediterranean. Since the nineteenth century, the Graeco-Roman associations of Gandhāran art have attracted particular attention. Classically educated soldiers and administrators of that era were astonished by the uncanny resemblance of many works of Gandhāran sculpture to Greek and Roman art made thousands of miles to the west. More than a century later we can recognize that the Gandhāran artists’ appropriation of classical iconography and styles was diverse and extensive, but the explanation of this ‘influence’ remains puzzling and elusive. The Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre was initiated principally to cast new light on this old problem.

This volume is the third set of proceedings of the project’s annual workshop, and the first to address directly the question of cross-cultural influence on and by Gandhāran art. The contributors wrestle with old controversies, particularly the notion that Gandhāran art is a legacy of Hellenistic Greek rule in Central Asia and the growing consensus around the important role of the Roman Empire in shaping it. But they also seek to present a more complex and expansive view of the networks in which Gandhāra was embedded. Adopting a global perspective on the subject, they examine aspects of Gandhāra’s connections both within and beyond South Asia and Central Asia, including the profound influence which Gandhāran art itself had on the development of Buddhist art in China and India.

About the Editors
Wannaporn Rienjang obtained her doctorate in Archaeology from University of Cambridge. She is now Lecturer in Archaeology, Museum and Heritage Studies at the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University and a project consultant for the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. Her research focuses on the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Indian Ocean Trade and ancient working technologies of stone beads and vessels. ;

Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran a
NEW: The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland The British School at Rome’s Tiber Valley Project by Helen Patterson, Robert Witcher and Helga Di Giuseppe. Paperback; 205x290mm; 372 pages; 131 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 665 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 70. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696158. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696165. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland presents a new regional history of the middle Tiber valley as a lens through which to view the emergence and transformation of the city of Rome from 1000 BC to AD 1000. Setting the ancient city within the context of its immediate territory, the authors reveal the diverse and enduring links between the metropolis and its hinterland. At the heart of the volume is a detailed consideration of the results of a complete restudy of the pioneering South Etruria Survey (c. 1955–1970), one of the earliest and most influential Mediterranean landscape projects. Between 1998 and 2002, an international team based at the British School at Rome conducted a comprehensive restudy of the material and documentary archive generated by the South Etruria Survey. The results were supplemented with a number of other published and unpublished sources of archaeological evidence to create a database of around 5000 sites across southern Etruria and the Sabina Tiberina, extending in date from the Bronze Age, through the Etruscan/Sabine, Republican and imperial periods, to the middle ages. Analysis and discussion of these data have appeared in a series of interim articles published over the past two decades; the present volume offers a final synthesis of the project results.

The chapters include the first detailed assessment of the field methods of the South Etruria Survey, an extended discussion of the use of archaeological legacy data, and new insights into the social and economic connectivities between Rome and the communities of its northern hinterland across two millennia. The volume as a whole demonstrates how the archaeological evidence generated by landscape surveys can be used to rewrite narrative histories, even those based on cities as familiar as ancient Rome.

Includes contributions by Martin Millett, Simon Keay and Christopher Smith, and a preface by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill.

About the Authors
Helen Patterson is the former Assistant Director (Archaeology) of the British School at Rome and director of the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project (1998–2002). She is a specialist in the archaeology of the late antique and early medieval periods, with particular interests in ceramic production and distribution. She has published a series of edited volumes including Bridging the Tiber (2004), Mercator Placidissimus (with F. Coarelli, 2008) and Veii: the historical topography of the ancient city (with R. Cascino & H. Di Giuseppe, 2012).

Robert Witcher is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, UK. From 1999 to 2002, he was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. His research interests include landscape archaeology with a particular focus on the pre-Roman and Roman periods in Italy and the wider Mediterranean. He has published on aspects of ancient rural settlement, agriculture, demography and globalization. He is the editor of the world archaeology journal, Antiquity.

Helga Di Giuseppe specialises in Italian archaeology with particular interests in the classical and late antique periods. She has published widely on ancient landscape, Roman villas, and ceramic and textile production, and has edited several major excavation and conference volumes. From 1998 to 2002, she was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. She is currently project manager for Fasti Online with the International Association of Classical Archaeology and editorial manager with the publisher Scienze e Lettere.
NEW: Foragers in the middle Limpopo Valley: Trade, Place-making, and Social Complexity by Tim Forssman. Paperback; 203x276mm; 140 pages; 54 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 122 2020 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 100. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696851. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696868. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Between the last centuries BC and the early second millennium AD, central southern Africa witnessed massive social change. Several landscapes hosted a variety of socio-political developments that led to the establishment of state-level society at Mapungubwe, c. 1220 AD in the middle Limpopo Valley. These different landscapes were connected through various forms of circuitry, including social, political, economic and topographic networks. While most often these systems and developments are discussed in the context of farmer societies, local forager communities also saw associated shifts. They were present from before the arrival of farmers and not only witnessed but also participated in local systems leading to the appearance of complex society. Despite numerous studies in the valley, this has not been explored; generally, forager involvement in socio-political developments has been ignored and only farmer sequences have been considered. However, from the early first millennium AD, foragers themselves transformed their own society. Changes have been noted in settlement patterns, craft production, trade relations, social interactions, wealth accumulation, and status. Moreover, these changes occurred unevenly across the landscape; at different forager sites, different responses to shifting social networks have been recorded. When viewed together, the spectrum of change suggests that valley foragers developed social complexity.

About the Author
Tim Forssman is a senior lecturer at the University of Pretoria. Previously, he managed a dam development mitigation project in Lesotho and was a postdoctoral reader at the Universities of the Witwatersrand and Pretoria. His research interests include forager-farmer interactions, forager economies, trade dynamics, landscape archaeology, and rock art.
NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 4 2019 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297mm; 204 pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697841. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

JHP is an independent learned journal dedicated to the research of ceramics and objects of daily use of the Hellenistic period in the Mediterranean region and beyond. It aims at bringing together archaeologists, historians, philologists, numismatists and scholars of related disciplines engaged in the research of the Hellenistic heritage.

ARTICLES ;
Understanding the Jal el-Bahr Storage-Jar Assemblage – Donald T. Ariel ;
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeologica Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2019 – Justin Stephens, Brandon R. Olson, Thomas Landvatter & R. Scott Moore ;
A Hellenistic Farmhouse at the Entrance to the Town of El’ad – All Nagorsky ;
Cave 169 at Marisa: The Imported Ptolemaic Red Ware – Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom ;
Lissos in Illyria: Two Centuries of Hellenistic Pottery, and a Plea for the Publication of Contextual Material – Patricia Kögler ;

BOOK REVIEWS ;
Sarah James, Hellenistic Pottery. The Fine Wares, Corinth 7, 7 – Brice Erickson ;
Gabriel Mazor, Walid Atrash & Gerald Finkielsztejn, Bet She’an IV. Hellenistic Nisa-Scythopolis. The Amphora Stamps and Sealings from Tel Iztabba – Marek Palaczyk ;
Henrieta Todorova (ed.), Durankulak 3. Die hellenistischen Befunde – Reyhan Şahin ;
Idit Sagiv, Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems. Meaning and Interpretations – Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Hershkovitz ;
Kalliope Bairami, Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times – Natalia Kazakidi ;
Qumran, Unchecked Parallelomina, and Pseudonymity in Academic Publication, review article of Kenneth Silver, Alexandria and Qumran: Back to the Beginning – Dennis Mizzi
NEW: Mapping the Past: From Sampling Sites and Landscapes to Exploring the ‘Archaeological Continuum’ Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 8 Session VIII-1 edited by Michel Dabas, Stefano Campana and Apostolos Sarris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 94 pages; 35 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 676 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697131. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697148 . Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Session VIII-1 of UISPP 2018 in Paris ‘Mapping the Past’ brought together several contributions reflecting on the need to develop sustainable and reliable approaches to mapping our landscape heritage. The session was guided by the crucial concept termed the ‘archaeological continuum’. This concept can be defined as a proactive approach to landscape survey based on the summative evidence detected (or detectable) within the area under examination, reducing spatial and chronological gaps as far as possible through the intensive and extensive application of a wide variety of exploratory methods and analytical techniques. Research work across Europe as well as contributions presented in this session have demonstrated that it is now possible to explore the whole landscape of carefully chosen areas and study them as an archaeological continuum. Archaeological interpretations derived from this kind of approach can be expected to reveal different layers of information belonging to a variety of chronological horizons, each displaying mutual physical (stratigraphic) and conceptual relationships within that horizon. The raising of new archaeological questions and also the development of alternative conservation strategies directly stimulated by the radical ideas inherent in the concept of the ‘archaeological continuum’ are among the major outcomes of the session.

About the Editors
Michel Dabas is Senior Researcher and Co-Director of the Laboratory of Archaeology at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris (AOROC) where he develops approaches for the provision of interactive maps on the web (chronocarto.eu portal) and focuses on the application of geophysical methods for archaeological sites. ;

Stefano R.L. Campana is Professor of Landscape Archaeology at the University of Siena. His research is focused on the understanding of past Mediterranean landscapes from late prehistory to contemporary times. ;

Apostolos Sarris is ‘Sylvia Ioannou’ Professor of Digital Humanities at the Archaeological Research Unit, University of Cyprus and Research Director at F.O.R.T.H.: Head of the GeoSat ReSeArch Lab. He is an Adjunct/Affiliate Professor at Cyprus University of Technology and a Research Associate of the Department of Anthropology, the Field Museum of Natural History of Chicago, Illinois, USA. His research focuses on geophysical prospection, GIS spatial modelling and satellite remote sensing in archaeology.
NEW: IKUWA6. Shared Heritage: Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress for Underwater Archaeology 28 November–2 December 2016, Western Australian Maritime Museum Fremantle, Western Australia edited by Jennifer A. Rodrigues and Arianna Traviglia. Paperback; 205x290mm; 698 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 666 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916428. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916435. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Celebrating the theme ‘Shared heritage’, IKUWA6 (the 6th International Congress for Underwater Archaeology), was the first such major conference to be held in the Asia-Pacific region, and the first IKUWA meeting hosted outside Europe since the organisation’s inception in Germany in the 1990s. A primary objective of holding IKUWA6 in Australia was to give greater voice to practitioners and emerging researchers across the Asia and Pacific regions who are often not well represented in northern hemisphere scientific gatherings of this scale; and, to focus on the areas of overlap in our mutual heritage, techniques and technology. Drawing together peer-reviewed presentations by delegates from across the world who converged in Fremantle in 2016 to participate, this volume covers a stimulating diversity of themes and niche topics of value to maritime archaeology practitioners, researchers, students, historians and museum professionals across the world.

About the Editors
Jennifer Rodrigues graduated as an archaeologist in Australia before specialising her training at the University of Southampton’s Centre for Maritime Archaeology, England, in 2000, after which she joined the Mary Rose Trust. Upon returning to Australia, she worked as a heritage consultant in Victoria and New South Wales, investigating Indigenous heritage sites, before joining the Western Australian Museum as Curator, Collections Manager then Exhibitions Project Manager over 16 years. She completed her doctorate at the University of Western Australia in 2011, and was Editor of the Australasian Journal for Maritime Archaeology from 2012 to 2015. In 2019 she joined the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as Senior Curator of the Centre for Indigenous Knowledges.

Arianna Traviglia is the Coordinator of the IIT Centre for Cultural Heritage Technology (Italy). Trained as an archaeologist, her work primarily focuses on mediating the inclusion of digital technology within the study of archaeological landscapes, especially waterscapes and lagoon environments. From 2006 to 2015 she held positions as Postdoctoral Fellow in Australia at Sydney and Macquarie Universities, before re-entering European academia as recipient of a Marie Curie Fellowship in 2015. She is Co- Editor of the Journal of Computer Application in Archaeology (JCAA) and currently a member of the Management Committee of the EC COST Action Arkwork, and a PI on the H2020 NETCHER project focused on protection of endangered Cultural Heritage.
NEW: Studies in Archaeometry Proceedings of the Archaeometry Symposium at NORM 2019, June 16-19, Portland, Oregon, Portland State University. Dedicated to the Rev. H. Richard Rutherford, C.S.C., Ph.D edited by Mario Ramírez Galán and Ronda Sandifer Bard. Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 120 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697346. £46.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697339. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume is in honor of the American scholar Rev. H. Richard Rutherford, C.S.C, Ph.D (University of Portland). It contains the papers presented at the Archaeometry Symposium in the 74th Northwest Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society (NORM) which took place in Portland (Oregon), June 18th 2019, covering a wide range of topics. The volume includes papers about the application of different techniques in archaeology in order to comprehend some aspects during and after the excavation, for instance, physics, chemical analysis, remote sensing, LiDAR, etc. This work compiles papers about sites from different places around of the world, Spain, Canada, Thailand, Lithuania or Russia.

The aim of the symposium was to facilitate communication between scholars from different places, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research.

About the Editors
Mario Ramírez Galán, PhD., is Adjunct Professor in archaeology at the University of Portland (Portland, Oregon) and PhD. in archaeology from the UAH (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid). He has participated in international and Spanish congresses and roundtable sessions. He has participated in several archaeological excavations in the United States in collaboration with the city of Salem (Oregon) to study several aspects of its cultural heritage. Furthermore, he worked at different Spanish archaeological projects, for instance, the battle of Baecula or Complutum. Additionally, he has published papers in some of the most important journals (Archaeometry and Archaeological Prospection), and also books about battlefield archaeology, landscape archaeology, new technologies applied to archaeology, and archaeometry. During the last years, his investigation has been focused on the application of different techniques to study the medieval siege of Alcalá la Vieja. Ronda Sandifer Bard, PhD., is Lecturer in Chemistry at the University of Portland (Portland, Oregon). Her research interests include carbanion chemistry, polymer-bound reactive intermediates, and archaeometry, particularly XRF analysis of metal and bone artifacts. Since 2014, she has helped lead the annual UP Pollentia Undergraduate Research Expedition at the ancient Roman city of Pollentia in Mallorca, Spain, where UP faculty-student teams work at the invitation of the Consortium of the Roman City of Pollentia and its Directors and in collaboration with the Pollentia Field School associated with the University of Barcelona.
The dawn of the Islamic era? The excavation of Yughbī in the Crowded Desert of Qatar by Jose C. Carvajal López, Kirk Roberts, Laura Morabito, Gareth Rees, Frank Stremke, Anke Marsh, David M. Freire-Lista, Robert Carter & Faiṣal ‘Abd Allāh al-Na‘īmī. Pages 53-69 from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 50 2020 edited by Daniel Eddisford. PSAS. Download Full PDF  

This paper introduces the main results of the excavation at the site of Yughbī during the last season of fieldwork of The Crowded Desert Project in the north-west of Qatar between March and April 2018. While the area of Yughbī was occupied for a long period of time, this paper focuses on a small number of stone buildings that dated mainly to the Umayyad period (AD 661–750), but also with reference to a more extended occupation that may be dated as early as the late Sasanian-Rāshidūn caliphate period (AD 498–661), and perhaps even earlier, to the early ‘Abbāsid period (c. AD 750–900). The Umayyad phase includes stone buildings that served as a permanent or semi-permanent base for a nomadic group in the process of sedentarization, or recently settled at the site. The finds of pottery, glass, metals, and other materials indicate that the community living at the site was well integrated within a wider landscape that included economic interests in the desert and the sea, and even long-distance connections.
The Maltese Archipelago at the Dawn of History Reassessment of the 1909 and 1959 Excavations at Qlejgħa tal-Baħrija and Other Essays edited by Davide Tanasi and David Cardona. Paperback; 205x290mm; 188 pages; 192 figures, 27 tables (77 pages of colour). 667 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694932. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694949. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Maltese Archipelago at the Dawn of History. Reassessment of the 1909 and 1959 excavations at Qlejgħa tal-Baħrija and other essays is a collection of essays focusing on the reassessment of the multifaceted evidence which emerged by excavations carried out in 1909 and 1959 in the settlement of Bahrija, a key site for the understanding of the later stages of Maltese prehistory before the beginning of the Phoenician colonial period. The two excavations, largely unpublished, produced a large quantity of ceramic, stone and metal artefacts together with skeletal remains. The reappraisal of the material will shed light on critical moments of central Mediterranean prehistory. Main topics such as the Aegean-Sicily-Malta trade network, mass migration movements from the Balkans towards the Central Mediterranean and the colonial dynamics of the Phoenicians operating in the West are addressed in the light of new data and with the support of an array of archaeometric analyses.

About the Editors
Davide Tanasi is an expert of Mediterranean prehistory and archaeology of ancient Sicily and Malta, in which fields is has published several papers and monographic volumes such as: D. Tanasi, N. Vella (eds), Site, artefacts, landscape: prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta, Monza: Polimetrica 2011; D. Tanasi, N. Vella (eds) The late prehistory of Malta: essays on Borġ in-Nadur and other sites, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2015. ;

David Cardona is Senior Curator of Phoenician, Roman and Medieval sites with the governmental agency Heritage Malta. He is a specialist of Roman and Late Roman archaeology and in this field he is about to publish a comprehensive work on Malta entitled Roman buildings and their architecture in Malta. His research interests include landscape archaeology, archaeology of technology and architecture.
New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East Studies in Honour of Tony J. Wilkinson edited by Dan Lawrence, Mark Altaweel and Graham Philip. Paperback; 205x290mm; 346 pages; 181 figures, 22 tables, 10 plates (46 pages of colour). 662 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695731. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695748. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East is a collection of papers produced in honour of Tony James Wilkinson, who was Professor of Archaeology at Durham University from 2006 until his death in 2014. Though commemorative in concept, the volume is an assemblage of new research representing emerging agendas and innovative methods in remote sensing. The intention is to explore the opportunities and challenges faced by researchers in the field today, and the tools, techniques, and theoretical approaches available to resolve them within the framework of landscape archaeology. The papers build on the traditional strengths of landscape archaeology, such as geoarchaeology and settlement pattern analysis, as well as integrating data sources to address major research questions, such as the ancient economy, urbanism, water management and the treatment of the dead. The authors demonstrate the importance of an interdisciplinary approach for understanding the impact of human activity on shaping the landscape and the effect that landscape has on sociocultural development.

About the Editors
Dr Dan Lawrence is an Associate Professor in the department of Archaeology at Durham University and director of the Archaeology Informatics Laboratory, a specialist hub for remote sensing and computational approaches to the archaeological record. He has directed landscape survey projects across the Middle East and Central Asia, and is currently working on the publication of survey work in Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan. ;

Mark Altaweel
is Reader in Near East Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He has taught courses and conducted research on Near Eastern history and archaeology, using GIS, computational modelling, big data analytics, remote sensing methods, and socialecological theory. He has led many projects in the Near East while being also involved in various research projects on complex systems in other disciplines. ;

Graham Philip is Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology, Durham University. He has served as Editor of the journal Levant since 2008. He excavated the Chalcolithic / Early Bronze Age site of Tell esh-Shuna North in Jordan (1991-94) and currently directs a collaborative project with the American University of Beirut at the Neolithic and EBA site of Tell Koubba in North Lebanon.
Stone in Metal Ages Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 6, Session XXXIV-6 edited by Francesca Manclossi, Florine Marchand, Linda Boutoille and Sylvie Cousseran-Néré. Paperback; 205x290mm; 134 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (24 pages in colour). Papers in English and French. 659 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696677. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696684. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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Session XXXIV-6 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): ‘Stone in Metal Ages’ was divided in two parts. The first, ‘Late stone talks: Lithic industries in Metal Ages’, was concerned with knapping. The papers dealt with lithic technology, use-wear analyses and the relation between the decline of stone and the development of metallurgy. The second, ‘Let there be rock and metal: l’outillage en pierre des métallurgistes préhistoriques de la mine à l’atelier’, was designed for papers focussing on stone tools used for metallurgy. This publication combines these two parts. Despite the fact that metal took the place of stone in many spheres, the analysis of lithic products created during the Metal Ages has seen progressive development. Objects and tools made of flint, chert and other stone materials remain important components of the archaeological record, and their study has offered new perspectives on ancient societies. Not only have many aspects of the everyday life of ancient people been better understood, but the socioeconomic and cultural systems associated with the production, circulation and use of stone tools have offered new information not available from other realms of material culture.

About the Editors
Francesca Manclossi is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and she is affiliated at the Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem. ;

Florine Marchand is part of an experimental archaeology team investigating the pressure techniques with the collaboration of Archéorient of Jalès (Casteljau-et-Berrias, France). ;

Linda Boutoille held a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship and subsequently a Royal Irish Academy Research Grant, based at Queen’s University Belfast. ;

Sylvie Cousseran-Néré is an archaeologist of the French National Archaeological Research Institute (Inrap).
Demography and Migration Population trajectories from the Neolithic to the Iron Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 5: Sessions XXXII-2 and XXXIV-8 edited by Thibault Lachenal, Réjane Roure and Olivier Lemercier. Paperback; 205x290mm; 180 pages; 89 figures, 2 tables. Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £35.00. 653 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696653. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696660. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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This volume presents the combined proceedings of two complementary sessions of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): Sessions XXXII-2 and XXXIV-8. These sessions aimed to identify demographic variations during the Neolithic and Bronze Age and to question their causes while avoiding the potential taphonomic and chronological biases affecting the documentation. It appears that certain periods feature a large number of domestic and/or funeral sites in a given region and much fewer in the following periods. These phenomena have most often been interpreted in terms of demographics, habitat organization or land use. They are sometimes linked to climatic and environmental crises or historical events, such as population displacements. In the past few years, the increase in large-scale palaeogenetic analyses concerning late prehistory and protohistory has led to the interpretation of genomic modifications as the result of population movements leading to demographic transformations. Nevertheless, historiography demonstrates how ideas come and go and come again. Migration is one of these ideas: developed in the first part of the XX century, then abandoned for more social and economic analysis, it recently again assumed importance for the field of ancient people with the increase of isotopic and ancient DNA analysis. But these new analyses have to be discussed, as the old theories have been; their results offer new data, but not definitive answers. During the sessions, the full range of archaeological data and isotopic and genetic analysis were covered, however for this publication, mainly archaeological perspectives are presented.

About the Editors
Réjane Roure is Senior Lecturer in Protohistoric Archaeology at Paul Valéry Montpellier 3 University; she works in the Joint Research Unit ‘Archaeology of Mediterranean Societies’ (JRU5140-ASM). Specialist in Iron Age societies in Mediterranean Celtic, she works on relations between the Mediterranean and continental Europe, on contacts between Greeks and Gauls and on the ritual practices of ancient societies. Since 2002, she has directed excavations at the archaeological site of Cailar (South of France), where had been found human remains linked to the Gallic practice of severed heads.

Thibault Lachenal is a CNRS Research Fellow and manager of the ‘Society of Prehistory and Protohistory’ team of the ‘Archaeology of Mediterranean Societies’ laboratory (UMR5140-ASM) in Montpellier. Specialist in the Bronze Age in the North-Western Mediterranean, his work focuses on the study of material culture, settlement and selective deposition of metalwork. He has supervised and collaborated in several archaeological excavations in southern France, Corsica and northern Italy and is currently in charge of underwater research at the La Motte site in Agde, a submerged Late Bronze Age settlement.

Olivier Lemercier is Professor of Prehistory at the University Paul Valéry - Montpellier 3 (France), and director of studies for the Master of Archaeology and Doctor of Archaeology degrees sp. Prehistory, Protohistory, Paleoenvironments, Mediterranean and African. Specialist in Bell Beakers and more generally the Neolithic and the transition to the Bronze Age in Europe and the Mediterranean, he is member of the editorial board of the Bulletin de la Société Préhistorique Française, member appointed to the CNRA and the Scientific Council of the Inrap. Author or coordinator of five books and a hundred scientific articles. He is currently President of
A Biography of Power: Research and Excavations at the Iron Age 'oppidum' of Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979-2017) by Tom Moore. Paperback; 205x290mm; 626 pages, illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 621 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695342. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695359. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume explores the changing nature of power and identity from the Iron Age to Roman period in Britain. Presenting detailed excavation results and integrating a range of comprehensive specialist studies, A Biography of Power provides fresh insights into the origins and nature of one of the lesser-known, but perhaps most significant, Late Iron Age oppida in Britain: Bagendon in Gloucestershire.

Combining the results of a large-scale geophysical survey, with analysis of both historic and new excavations, this volume reassesses Iron Age occupation at Bagendon, revealing evidence for diverse artisanal activities and complex regional exchange networks that saw livestock, and people, travelling to Bagendon from west of the Severn. The results of excavation of two morphologically unusual, banjo-like enclosures, and of one of the previously unexamined dykes, has revealed that the Bagendon oppidum had earlier origins and more complex roles than previously envisaged. The volume also provides new insights into the nature of the Iron Age and Roman landscape in which Bagendon was situated. Detailing the discovery of two, previously unknown, Roman villas at Bagendon, this research also demonstrates the continued significance of this landscape in the early Roman province.

This volume redefines Bagendon as a landscape of power, which offers important insights into the changing nature of societies from the Middle Iron Age to Roman period. It calls for a radical reassessment of how we define oppida complexes and their socio-political importance at the turn of the 1st millennium BC.

Contains contributions from Sophia Adams, Michael J. Allen, Sam Bithell, Loïc Boscher, Cameron Clegg, G.B. Dannell, Lorne Elliott, Elizabeth Foulds, Freddie Foulds, Christopher Green, Derek Hamilton, Colin Haselgrove, Yvonne Inall, Tina Jakob, Mandy Jay, Sally Kellett, Robert Kenyon, Mark Landon, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Edward McSloy, Janet Montgomery, J.A. Morley-Stone, Geoff Nowell, Charlotte O’Brien, Chris Ottley, Cynthia Poole, Richard Reece, Harry Robson, Ruth Shaffrey, John Shepherd, Jane Timby, Dirk Visser, D.F. Williams, Steven Willis.

About the Editor
Tom Moore is an Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University. His research focuses on the western European Iron Age and approaches to cultural landscape management. He has published widely on Iron Age social organisation and conducted major field projects at Late Iron Age oppida in Britain and France, including at Bibracte, Burgundy. He is co-author of the textbook: Archaeology: an introduction.

Table of Contents:
Summary ;
Acknowledgements ;
Chapter 1: Research at Bagendon ;
Chapter 2: The wider Bagendon complex: remote sensing surveys 2008-2016 ;
Chapter 3: Before the ‘oppidum’: Excavations at Scrubditch and Cutham enclosures ;
Chapter 4: Revisiting Late Iron Age Bagendon ;
Chapter 5: After the ‘oppidum’. Excavations at Black Grove ;
Chapter 6: Iron Age and Roman ceramics ;
Chapter 7: Brooches ;
Chapter 8: Metalwork ;
Chapter 9: An analytical study of the Iron Age bloomery slag ;
Chapter 10: Coinage ;
Chapter 11: Coin moulds ;
Chapter 12: Miscellaneous material ;
Chapter 13: Radiocarbon dates and Bayesian analysis ;
Chapter 14: Dating the Roman fort at Cirencester ;
Chapter 15: Human Remains ;
Chapter 16: Faunal Remains ;
Chapter 17: Isotopic analysis of human and animal remains ;
Chapter 18: The plant and invertebrate remains (1979-2017) ;
Chapter 19: Putting the Bagendon complex into its landscape setting: the geoarchaeological and land snail evidence ;
Chapter 20: Viewsheds and Least Cost analysis of the Bagendon complex and its environs ;
Chapter 21: Geophysical survey at Hailey Wood Camp, Sapperton, Gloucester
The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963-69: The Pharaonic Sites edited by David N. Edwards. Hardback; 205x290mm; 468 pages; 812 figures, 2 tables (16 plates in colour). 652 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 23. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696493. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696509. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Of the Nubian Archaeological Campaigns responding to the construction of the Aswan High Dam, the survey and excavations carried out within Sudanese Nubia represent the most substantial achievement of the larger enterprise. Many components of the larger project of the UNESCO – Sudan Antiquities Service Survey have been published, in addition to the reports of a number of other major projects assigned separate concessions within the region. However, the results of one major element, the Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia (ASSN) between the Second Cataract and the Dal Cataract remain largely unpublished. This volume, focusing on the pharaonic sites, is the first of a series which aims to bring to publication the records of the ASSN. These records represent a major body of data relating to a region largely now lost to flooding. This is also a region of very considerable importance for understanding the archaeology and history of Nubia more generally, not least in relation to the still often poorly understood relationships between Lower Nubia to the north and the surviving areas of Middle and Upper Nubia, to the south.

The ASSN project fieldwork was undertaken over six years between 1963 and 1969, investigating c.130km of the river valley between Gemai, at the south end of the Second Cataract, and Dal.
Le verre de Sabra al-Mansuriya - Kairouan, Tunisie - milieu Xe-milieu XIe siècle : Production et consommation: vaisselle - contenants - vitrages by Danièle Foy with a contribution by Ian Freestone; preface by Faouzi Mahfoudh. Paperback; 300 pages; 111 figures; French text with abstract in English and Arabic. 650 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696615. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696622. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Islamic glass and its craftsmanship in the Medieval period are known almost exclusively from Middle Eastern literature. The study of the structures of the workshop and the very rich glass assemblage from Sabra al-Mansuriya (Kairouan), the Fatimid capital founded in 947/948 and destroyed in 1057, proves that Ifriqiya followed the technological evolutions of glass craftsmanship.

An examination of the furnaces and the various artefacts discovered highlights the double vocation of a palatial factory: to produce glass and glazed ceramics. From this particular workshop, installed in the wing of a palace, we found everyday glassware as well as more luxurious types, some with very specific forms, others reproducing models known throughout the Islamic world. These productions are local and imported – distinguished through morphological and chemical analyzes – and form the basis of a first typology of glass used in Ifriqiya from the 10th to 11th century.

Architectural glass, partly made on site, is also abundant. The crown-glass of different colours, used whole or in small fragments, adorned the openwork panel walls with various carvings. The windows and their glass offered a rich polychrome and a complex decorative syntax, reflecting significant technical mastery and the desire to display economic and political power.

About the Author
Danièle Foy is Emeritus Research Director at CNRS, Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France). Her work concerns crafts, trade and consumption of glass in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the pre-industrial period in the Mediterranean area.

Le verre islamique et son artisanat à l’époque médiévale sont presque exclusivement connus par la documentation du Proche-Orient. L’étude des structures de l’atelier et du très riche mobilier en verre de Sabra al-Mansuriya (Kairouan), capitale fatimide fondée en 947/948 et détruite en 1057, prouve que l’Ifriqiya n’est pas resté en retrait de l’essor de l’artisanat verrier. L’examen des fours et des différents artefacts mis au jour met en évidence la double vocation d’une fabrique palatiale : produire du verre et de la céramique glaçurée. De cet atelier particulier, installé dans l’aile d’un palais, sortaient des verres communs et d’autres plus luxueux, certains de formes spécifiques, d’autres reproduisant des modèles connus dans l’ensemble du monde islamique. Ces productions locales et les importations, distinguées par l’étude morphologique et les analyses chimiques, forment la base d’une première typologie des verres utilisés dans l’Ifriqiya des Xe-XIe siècle.

Le verre architectural, en partie fabriqué sur place, est également abondant. Les cives de différentes couleurs, utilisées entières ou en menus fragments, garnissaient des claustras de plâtre très ajourés et aux découpes variées. Les fenêtres et leurs vitraux offraient une riche polychromie et une syntaxe décorative complexe, traduisant une grande maîtrise technique et la volonté d’exprimer un pouvoir économique et politique.

Danièle Foy est directrice de recherches émérite au CNRS, Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en- Provence, France). Ses travaux concernent l’artisanat, le commerce et la consommation du verre dans l’Antiquité, le Moyen Age et la période pré-industrielle dans l’espace méditerranéen. Ses publications sur le verre islamique portent sur le mobilier de Fustat-Le Caire, Hadir et Damas en Syrie et Sharma au Yémen. En Tunisie, elle a principalement étudié le verre d’époque romaine provenant de Carthage, Pupput, Sidi Jdidi et Nabeul.
Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East edited by Anja Fügert and Helen Gries. Paperback; 205x290mm; 130 pages; 97 figures, 5 tables (61 colour pages). 645 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696059. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696066. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Glazed bricks applied as a new form of colourful and glossy architectural decor first started to appear in the early Iron Age on monumental buildings of the Ancient Near East. It surely impressed the spectators then as it does the museum visitors today. Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East comprises the proceedings of a workshop held at the 11th International Congress of the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (ICAANE) at Munich in April 2018, organised by the editors. Over the last decade excavations have supplied new evidence from glazed bricks that once decorated the facades of the Ancient Near East’s public buildings during the Iron Age (1000–539 BC) and especially significant progress has been achieved from revived work on glazed bricks excavated more than a century ago which today are kept in various museum collections worldwide. Since the latest summarising works on Ancient Near Eastern glazed architectural décors have been published several decades ago and in the meantime considerable insight into the subject has been gained, this volume aims to provide an updated overview of the development of glazed bricks and of the scientific research on the Iron Age glazes. Furthermore, it presents the on-going research on this topic and new insights into glazed bricks from Ashur, Nimrud, Khorsabad, and Babylon.

About the Editors
Anja Fügert received her master’s degree in Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2005 with a dissertation on the Old Babylonian palace at Uruk. From 2005 to 2014 she was a staff member of the research project Tell Sheikh Hamad / Syria and in 2013 she defended her PhD on the Neo-Assyrian glyptics from this site. After working as a freelance illustrator in the Egyptian National Museum in Cairo she did a 2-year traineeship at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. She also taught courses of Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin and at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. Since December 2017 she is the head of the editorial office of the Orient-Department of the German Archaeological Institute. Together with Helen Gries, she initiated and directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur).

Helen Gries obtained MA in Near Eastern Archaeology at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität of Mainz in 2010. In 2011 she started her PhD as a member of the Graduate School ‘Formen von Prestige in Kulturen des Altertums’ at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität of Munich. In 2014 she completed her PhD at Munich with a dissertation on the Ashur temple at Ashur. She has undertaken fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Lebanon, and Jordan. In 2014 and 2015 she was postdoc researcher and lecturer at Institute of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Munich. Since 2015 she is researcher and curator for Mesopotamia at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. Together with Anja Fügert, she directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur), which is funded by the German Research Foundation since 2018.
Different Times? Archaeological and Environmental Data from Intra-Site and Off-Site Sequences Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 4, Session II-8 edited by Zoï Tsirtsoni, Catherine Kuzucuoğlu, Philippe Nondédéo, Olivier Weller. Paperback; 205x290mm; 136 pages; 39 figures, 10 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £32.00. 642 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696516. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696523. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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Different Times? Archaeological and environmental data from intra-site and off-site sequences brings together seven papers from Session II-8 of the XVIII UISPP Congress (Paris, 4-9 June 2018). The session questioned temporal correlations between intra-site and off-site data in archaeology-related contexts. The word ‘site’ describes here archaeological sites or groups of sites – usually settlements – that have undergone research in recent years and produced information on the duration and timing of human presence. Comparison with evidence from geomorphological and paleoenvironmental research conducted at various distances from settlements gives some interesting results, such as ‘missing’ occupation periods, distortions in human presence intensity through space as well as time, variability in explanations concerning the abandonment of settlements, etc. Examples presented here highlight: first, discrepancies between time records within built areas used for living and the surrounding lands used for other activities (cultivation, herding, travelling, etc); second, discrepancies produced by the use of different ‘time markers’ (ie. chronostratigraphy of archaeological layers or pottery evolution on the one hand, sedimentary or pollen sequences on the other hand). Although improving the resolution of individual data is essential, the authors argue that the joint and detailed examination of evidence produced together by human and natural scientists is more important for reaching a reliable reconstruction of past people’s activities. Both the session and the volume stem from the Working Group ‘Environmental and Social Changes in the Past’ (Changements environnementaux et sociétés dans le passé) in the research framework of the Cluster of Excellence ‘Dynamite’ (Territorial and Spatial Dynamics) of the University Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne (ANR-11-LABX-0046, Investissements d’Avenir).

About the Editors
Zoï Tsirtsoni is an archaeologist and researcher at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), currently in position at the laboratory Archéologies et Sciences de l’Antiquité at Nanterre. She is a specialist in Aegean and Balkan prehistory and co-director, since 2008, of the Greek-French research project at the tell settlement of Dikili Tash in Greek Eastern Macedonia. Concerned with relative and absolute chronology, crafts (especially pottery), settlement, and problems of archaeological visibility, she has coordinated or participated in several collaborative interdisciplinary research projects (e.g. ANR ‘Balkans 4000’, ERC ‘PlantCult’), already published or in progress.

Catherine Kuzucuoğlu is a geomorphologist at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique). Working in the fields of physical geography, geoarchaeology, volcanism and reconstruction of past climates and environments, she develops collaboration research programs with Turkish and international teams in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Anatolia, investigating (1) Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of valleys and lakes, (2) geomorphological records of recent volcanic activity and landscape evolution, (3) reconstructions of climate and environment from lake and marsh records, and their impacts on past civilizations. She has been Deputy Director in charge of Archaeology at French Institute for Anatolian Studies in Istanbul (2000- 2003), and Director of Laboratory of Physical Geography (2009-2013).

Philippe Nondédéo is currently an investigator at the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Sc
Barbaric Splendour: The Use of Image Before and After Rome edited by Toby F. Martin with Wendy Morrison. Paperback; 203x276mm; 152 pages; 38 figures (30 colour pages). 119 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696592. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696608. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Barbaric Splendour: the use of image before and after Rome comprises a collection of essays comparing late Iron Age and Early Medieval art. Though this is an unconventional approach, there are obvious grounds for comparison. Images from both periods revel in complex compositions in which it is hard to distinguish figural elements from geometric patterns. Moreover, in both periods, images rarely stood alone and for their own sake. Instead, they decorated other forms of material culture, particularly items of personal adornment and weaponry. The key comparison, however, is the relationship of these images to those of Rome. Fundamentally, the book asks what making images meant on the fringe of an expanding or contracting empire, particularly as the art from both periods drew heavily from – but radically transformed – imperial imagery.

About the Editors
Toby Martin currently works as a lecturer at Oxford University’s Department for Continuing Education, where he specialises in adult and online education. His research concentrates on theoretical and interpretative aspects of material culture in Early Medieval Europe. Toby has also worked as a field archaeologist and project officer in the commercial archaeological sector and continues to work as a small finds specialist.

Wendy Morrison currently works for the Chilterns Conservation Board managing the NLHF funded Beacons of the Past Hillforts project, the UK’s largest high-res archaeological LiDAR survey. She also is Senior Associate Tutor for Archaeology at the Oxford University Department for Continuing Education. Wendy’s research areas are Prehistoric European Archaeology and Landscape Archaeology. She has over a decade’s excavation experience in Southern Britain, the Channel Islands, and India.
On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids by David Ian Lightbody. Paperback; 203x276mm; 100 pages; 47 figures. 118 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696578. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696585. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids is a treatise on the subject of encircling symbolism in pharaonic monumental tomb architecture. The study focuses on the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom of ancient Egypt; from the first dynasty through the sixth. During that time, encircling symbolism was developed most significantly and became most influential. The cartouche also became the principal symbol of the pharaoh for the first time. This work demonstrates how the development of the cartouche was closely related to the monumental encircling symbolism incorporated into the architectural designs of the Old Kingdom pyramids. By employing a new architectural style, the pyramid, and a new iconographic symbol, the cartouche, the pharaoh sought to elevate his status above that of the members of his powerful court. These iconic new emblems emphasized and protected the pharaoh in life, and were retained in the afterlife. By studying the available evidence, the new and meaningful link between the two artistic media; iconographic and architectural, is catalogued, understood, and traced out through time.

Table of Contents
David Ian Lightbody, PhD., BEng (Hons), is an archaeologist with a special interest in the origins of architectural and scientific principles, most notably in the ancient Egyptian and Greek cultures. In 2016 he founded the Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture (JAEA) with co-editor Franck Monnier. He has published several journal articles, a monograph, and most recently, the Great Pyramid Haynes Operations Manual (2,590 B.C. onwards).