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Foreigners and Outside Influences in Medieval Norway edited by Stian Suppersberger Hamre. ii+124 pages; illustrated throughout (14 plates in colour). Available both in print and Open Access. 368 2017. ISBN 9781784917067. Book contents pageDownload

Foreigners and Outside Influences in Medieval Norway results from an international conference held in Bergen, Norway, in March 2016, entitled ‘Multidisciplinary approaches to improving our understanding of immigration and mobility in pre-modern Scandinavia (1000-1900)’. The articles in this volume discuss different aspects of immigration and foreign influences in medieval Norway, from the viewpoint of different academic disciplines. The book will give the reader an insight into how the population of medieval Norway interacted with the surrounding world, how and by whom it was influenced, and how the population was composed.

About the Editor
Dr Stian Suppersberger Hamre is a biological anthropologist with a BA in palaeoanthropology from the University of New England, Australia, and an MSc in forensic anthropology from Bournemouth University, England. His PhD research at the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bergen, Norway, has focussed on different aspects of the medieval population in Norway. From 2013, his main interest has been to improve our understanding of pre-modern immigration, mobility and population composition in Norway, with a special emphasis on bringing different disciplines together to illuminate these topics and to complement his own research as a biological anthropologist.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £16.00.
AP2017: 12th International Conference of Archaeological Prospection 12th-16th September 2017, University of Bradford edited by Benjamin Jennings, Christopher Gaffney, Thomas Sparrow and Sue Gaffney. vi+280 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (177 plates in colour). Available both in print and Open Access. 362 2017. ISBN 9781784916787. Book contents pageDownload

This volume is a product of the International Conference of Archaeological Prospection 2017 which was hosted by the School of Archaeological and Forensic Sciences at the University of Bradford. This event marked a return to the location of the inaugural conference of archaeological prospection which was held in Bradford in 1995. The conference is held every two years under the banner of the International Society for Archaeological Prospection.

The Proceedings of 12th International Conference of Archaeological Prospection draws together over 100 papers addressing archaeological prospection techniques, methodologies and case studies from around the world. Including studies from over 30 countries distributed across Africa, North America, South America, Asia and Europe; the collection of articles covers a diverse range of research backgrounds and situations. At this particular ICAP meeting, specific consideration has been given to emerging techniques and technologies in the fields of inter-tidal and marine archaeological prospection, and low altitude archaeological prospection.

The papers within this volume represent the conference themes of: Techniques and new technological developments; Applications and reconstructing landscapes and urban environments; Integration of techniques and inter-disciplinary studies, with focus on visualisation and interpretation; Marine, inter-tidal and wetland prospection techniques and applications; Low altitude prospection techniques and applications; Commercial archaeological prospection in the contemporary world.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £35.00.

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The Hunting Farmers: Understanding ancient human subsistence in the central part of the Korean peninsula during the Late Holocene by Seungki Kwak. xii+118 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 colour plates). Available both in print and Open Access. 37 2017. ISBN 9781784916763. Book contents pageDownload

The transition from foragers to farmers and the role of intensive rice agriculture have been among the most controversial subjects in Korean archaeology. However, the relatively high acidity of sediment in the Korean peninsula has made it impossible to examine faunal/floral remains directly for tracing the subsistence change. For this reason, many of the studies on the transition heavily relied on the shell middens in coastal areas, which reflect only a small portion of the overall subsistence in the Korean Peninsula. The subsistence behaviors recorded in numerous large-scale inland habitation sites have been obscured by the overall separation between hunter-gatherer and intensive rice farmer. This research investigates the role of intensive rice farming as a subsistence strategy in the central part of the prehistoric Korean peninsula using organic geochemical analysis and luminescence dating on potsherds. The central hypothesis of this research is that there was a wide range of resource utilization along with rice farming around 3,400-2,600 BP. This hypothesis contrasts with prevailing rice-based models, where climatically driven intensive rice agriculture from 3,400 BP is thought to be the dominant subsistence strategy that drove social complexity. This research focuses on four large-scale inland habitation sites that contain abundant pottery collections to evaluate the central hypothesis as well the prevailing rice-centred model. This research produced critical data for addressing prehistoric subsistence in the Korean peninsula and established a detailed chronology of subsistence during 3,400-1,800 BP.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £28.00.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Note for downloading: PDF displays best in Chrome. For best results right-click 'Download (pdf)' below and use the option 'Save link as...' to save a local copy to your computer/device. Please ensure file has finished downloading before opening and be sure to use desktop PDF reading software rather than browser-based software, otherwise file may appear corrupted.
Ancient Engineering: Selective Ceramic Processing in the Middle Balsas Region of Guerrero, Mexico by Jennifer Meanwell. xiv+352 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 36 2017 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 48. ISBN 9781784916510. Book contents pageDownload

This volume has two main objectives: establishing a chronology of the Middle Balsas and detailing the region’s pottery production methods. The author posits that pottery intended for different functions was often deliberately made and/or decorated in ways that were chosen to make the vessels more appropriate for their intended functions. More specifically, this study determines whether any of the pottery production patterns identified in the region are linked to specific constraints imposed by the materials during the process of pottery manufacture. For example, it examines whether variables such as vessel shape and wall thickness correlate with the clay types and processing techniques determined during thin section analysis of the ancient sherds. Additionally, certain production behaviours are identified that are characteristic of the entire region and that can be used as markers of local tradition.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £45.00.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Note for downloading: PDF displays best in Chrome. For best results right-click 'Download (pdf)' below and use the option 'Save link as...' to save a local copy to your computer/device. Please ensure file has finished downloading before opening and be sure to use desktop PDF reading software rather than browser-based software, otherwise file may appear corrupted.
The folding cubit rod of Kha in Museo Egizio di Torino, S.8391 Taken from Proceedings of the XI International Congress of Egyptologists, Florence, Italy 23-30 August 2015. Pages 450-456.Download

By Naoko Nishimoto

Much may be inferred about item S.8391, a folding cubit rod that belonged to Kha (TT 8, 18th Dynasty), by analyzing the results of the measurement survey conducted in 2011 from the perspective of woodwork. When Schiaparelli discovered the rod, it was folded inside a leather bag with a strap. The extremely rare folding cubit rod was loved by Kha, who was the overseer of works in Deir el-Medina and its related sites, where it was in practical use. This rod folds in half with a simple bronze hinge at the center; there are absolutely no inscriptions. The carved tally marks are only rough divisions into palms and the digits, and compared with other rods, the cubit measure is somewhat long, so the rod’s precision was in doubt. However, a metrological argument concerning the differences in the values of the palms and digits is proposed based on the presumed manner in which the wooden rod was created and actually used. The rod’s total length is 527.6mm, not greatly different from that reported by Senigalliesi in 1961. The size of each measurement interval, which Senigalliesi did not report, suggests how the rod was made. The tally marks are fine white lines; the left-hand palm is 75mm long, which is the common measurement of one palm, subdivided into four digits that vary little in size. Taking this into account, it is unthinkable that the makers lacked the ability to make tally marks accurately. The variations of values were supposedly caused by the process of creating the hinge. The center interval, including the hinge, is especially small, at (36mm + 36mm =) 72mm. For example, if we assume a play of about 3mm, a commonly used value, the center interval would become 36mm + 36mm + 3mm = 75mm. The inclination of the lines and the variations in size indicate that tally marks were etched in the closed position. S.8391 can also be used as a half-cubit measure in a closed position, and the first palm on the left side can measure digits. Traces of trial and error in remaking the hinge were found. In this study, I discovered that the clever hinge that makes this cubit rod possible satisfies two contradictory requirements to realize this rare folding rod. The appearance of this folding cubit rod, with no inscriptions and purely functional design, shows that it took incalculable effort to make it a prized instrument for the owner.
Mercenaries or refugees? The evidence from the inscriptions of Merenptah on the ‘Sea Peoples’ Taken from Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 2, 2017 (John Bintliff (editor-in-chief), Archaeopress, 2017) by Konstantinos Kopanias. pp.119-134. Journal of Greek Archaeology . Download

During the fifth regnal year of Merenptah (either 1208 BC or 1219 BC), king Merey of the Rebu/Lebu attacked Egypt, together with his archers and many northern warriors. These northerners were not affiliated with any of the existing minor or major kingdoms of the eastern Mediterranean, since they are only identified by obscure ethnonyms. Five inscriptions of Merenptah refer to these particular events, but they offer scarce historical information; a sixth one, inscribed on a wall of the Amun temple in Karnak, is the most elaborate one.5 Although the Karnak inscription has often been cited, most scholars usually focus on the parts referring to the ‘Sea Peoples’, which are often examined in isolation and out of their context. The aim of this paper is to re-examine the available evidence.

Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 2, 2017 will be published in October 2017. Subscriptions are available now with special reduced rates for private subscriptions and bundle prices available for Volumes 1-2, 2016-2017. Click here to view full information for print and online subscriptions.

Faience in seventh-century Greece: egyptianizing ‘bric a brac’ or a useful paradigm for relations with Egypt? Taken from Interpreting the Seventh Century BC edited by Xenia Charalambidou and Catherine Morgan. Pages 71-79.Download

By Virginia Webb

Egyptianizing objects found in seventh- and sixth-century contexts in east Greece and elsewhere are most often made of faience. There are many problems, both of dating and attribution. I would like to discuss one particular group of faience objects from seventh-century contexts, the small perfume vessels in double vase form (so-called Leopard Spot Group), and will make some comments on the parallel group of small lekythoi, pyxides and alabastra. These are not stray imports brought in on the whim of individuals for dedication or personal use, but the products of an intentionally established industry which was certain of its market, and whose products could be traded widely. These were highly valued objects acceptable both as dedications to the gods and as gifts for the grave. By examining the techniques and decorative motifs, strong links can be made with Egyptian craft traditions and in particular with the iconography of good luck signifiers. A complementary strand is the role of east Greece, in particular Rhodes, as an intermediary in the packaging and onward dispersal of oils. Around 650 BC, the appearance of these specific faience vessel types in east Greece and the west suggests that faience factories had been set up on the same model as for the terracotta aryballoi. It cannot be fortuitous that Egyptian models and techniques found such ready acceptance in the Greek world at this time.
Le massif de Lovo, sur les traces du royaume de Kongo Volume 1 by Geoffroy Heimlich. xiv+196; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white with 76 plates in colour. French text. 500+ page annex volume available online as a free-to-download PDF. Available both in print and Open Access. Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 95. ISBN 9781784916350. Book contents pageDownload

Unlike the Sahara or Southern Africa, the rock art of Central Africa is still largely unknown today. Despite being reported as early as the 16th century by Diego del Santissimo Sacramento, the rock art of the Kongo Central, an area encompassing parts of modern day Angola, Cabinda, the Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Gabon, has never been widely researched and its age remains uncertain.

Populated by the Ndibu, one of the Kongo subgroups, the Lovo massif is in the north of the ancient kingdom of Kongo. Even though this kingdom has, since 1500 AD, been one of the best documented in Africa, from historical sources as well as ethnographic and anthropological sources for the more recent periods, it remains largely unrecognized archaeologically. With 102 sites inventoried (including 16 ornate caves), it contains the largest concentration of rock art sites in the region, representing more than 5000 rock art images.

Crossing ethnological, historical, archaeological and mythological points of view, this book illustrates that rock art played an important part in Kongo culture. Like historical sources or oral traditions, it can provide historians with important documentation and contribute significantly to the reconstruction of Africa's past.

French description: À la différence des arts rupestres du Sahara ou d’Afrique australe, ceux d’Afrique centrale restent encore aujourd’hui largement méconnus. Bien que signalé dès le XVIe par Diego del Santissimo Sacramento, l’art rupestre du Kongo Central n’a jamais fait l’objet d’une recherche de grande ampleur et son âge reste toujours incertain. Peuplé par les Ndibu, un des sous-groupes kongo, le massif de Lovo se trouve dans le nord de l’ancien royaume de Kongo. Même si ce royaume est, à partir de 1500, l’un des mieux documentés de toute l’Afrique tant par les sources historiques que par les sources ethnographiques et anthropologiques pour les périodes plus récentes, il reste largement méconnu sur le plan archéologique. Avec 102 sites inventoriés (dont 16 grottes ornées), il contient la plus importante concentration de sites rupestres de toute la région, ce qui représente plus de 5000 images rupestres. En croisant les points de vue ethnologique, historique, archéologique et mythologique, j’ai pu montrer que l’art rupestre a bel et bien une part importante dans la culture kongo. Au même titre que les sources historiques ou les traditions orales, il peut apporter aux historiens une documentation de premier plan et contribuer à reconstruire le passé de l’Afrique.

Biographie: Expert au comité de l’ICOMOS pour l’art rupestre (CAR) et pour la gestion du patrimoine archéologique (ICAHM), Geoffroy Heimlich est docteur en archéologie auprès de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles et en histoire auprès de l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Sous la codirection de Pierre de Maret et Jean-Loïc Le Quellec, sa recherche doctorale a porté sur l’art rupestre du Kongo Central, en République démocratique du Congo. Il est actuellement chercheur associé, en France, à l’Institut des mondes africains (IMAF) et, en Belgique, au Centre de recherches en archéologie et patrimoine (CReA-Patrimoine) de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles et au Musée royal de l’Afrique centrale de Tervuren, ainsi qu’en Afrique du Sud, Honorary research fellow au Rock Art Research Institute de l’Université de Witwatersrand, à Johannesburg. Depuis 2016, il est également directeur de la mission archéologique « Lovo » du Ministère français des Affaires étrangères, en République démocratique du Congo et en Angola.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £34.00.
Le massif de Lovo, sur les traces du royaume de Kongo – Volume 2: Annexes by Geoffroy Heimlich. 512 pages; full colour throughout. Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 95. Download

Download Le massif de Lovo, sur les traces du royaume de Kongo – Volume 2: Annexes by Geoffroy Heimlich.

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Please note this PDF contains Volume 2: Annexes only.

Click here for Volume 1 in paperback priced £34.00.

Click here to download Volume 1 in PDF format in Archaeopress Open Access.
Archaeological Fieldwork in the Transitional Zone Between Puuc and Chenes (Campeche, Mexico) Taken from Recent Investigations in the Puuc Region of Yucatán edited by Meghan Rubenstein. Pages 87-97.Download

By Iken Paap

After the peak of settlement activity on the peninsula of Yucatán during the Late to Terminal Classic period (8th and 9th centuries A.D.), there was an abrupt end to all typical construction activities, followed by a change in the function and use of buildings, the introduction of new architectural concepts, and–eventually–the final abandonment of the settlements. Archaeological finds and features that indicate a drastic upheaval for the elites are found alongside evidence that suggests continuity in parts of the remaining, non-elite population. However, this continuity existed within radically changed sociocultural and environmental contexts. A major part of the discussion on these sudden changes focuses on the ‘C-shaped’ or ‘L-shaped’ structures, so named after their characteristic floor plans. These structures are deemed indicators for Epi- to Postclassic activities in the Puuc and neighboring regions. The preliminary results of recent excavations conducted by the Ibero-American Institute in Dzehkabtún (Campeche, Mexico) support the hypothesis that parts of the local population constructed and used the new building forms after the end of the Classic period.
El Sur de la Península Ibérica y el Mediterráneo Occidental: relaciones culturales en la segunda mitad del II milenio a.C. by Juan Manuel Garrido Anguita. 580 pages; illustrated throughout with 181 plates in colour. Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784916459. Book contents pageDownload

In ancient times, the first communities, societies and civilizations in the Iberian peninsula, according to archaeological evidence, began to develop following a progressive local evolution tempered by the significance of outside contacts. In order to reconstruct our history, resorting to ancient poets, we strive to distinguish reality from myth in the pursuit of a bond of certainty between the data provided by historical and literary sources and the excavated remains. Greek epics, based on the Illiad and the Odyssey, are the basis for the first speculations that link societies all along the Mediterranean coast, from east to west, with a common thread. However, how many times have we been told about mythical places, such as cities of great splendour and unique cultural progress? Did the land which Plato called Atlantis and Adolf Schulten linked to Tartessos truly exist? These answers may never be revealed (they are not at the forefront of research interests nowadays); for the time being, they are lost into a mythical and legendary world. Nonetheless, they remain alive over time.

Spanish description: En tiempos lejanos, ahora sepultadas bajo la caída de los años, comienzan a formarse las primeras comunidades, sociedades y civilizaciones que se irán desarrollando en la Península Ibérica, por una progresiva evolución local, sin descuidar la atención de los contactos foráneos previa contrastación arqueológica. Refugiándonos en figuras creadas por los antiguos poetas, tratamos de discernir entre lo que comúnmente se ha denominado mito-leyenda y lo real, buscando un vínculo de certeza entre los datos que revelan las fuentes literario-históricas y los vestigios que se desentierran de nuestra primera historia, aquella que tratamos de reconstruir. La épica occidental apoyada en los relatos homéricos de la Ilíada y la Odisea, son la base de las primeras conjeturas que con un hilo, unen a las sociedades que conviven en el Mar Mediterráneo desde Oriente hasta Occidente. Pero ¿cuántas veces hemos oído contar relatos sobre míticas ciudades de gran esplendor e inigualable progreso cultural? ¿Existió aquella tierra denominada por Platón “Atlántida” y que fue asociada por Adolf Schulten a Tartessos? Estas respuestas quizá nunca lleguen a desvelarse (tampoco están en la vanguardia de los intereses de la investigación), por ahora sólo están inmersas en un mundo mítico y legendario, pero es cierto que se mantienen vivas, nostálgicas, con el paso del tiempo.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £65.00.

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Mjeltehaugen: Europe’s northernmost Bell Beaker expression? Taken from New Perspectives on the Bronze Age edited by Sophie Bergerbrant and Anna Wessman. Pages 7-18.Download

By Anette Sand-Eriksen

By focusing on the monumental mound Mjeltehaugen, situated on the outer coast of western Norway, the present article explores the Bell Beaker Culture’s northern influence. Through presenting an analysis of the decorated slabs discovered inside the mound, alongside an assessment of style as an expression of social identity, the study provides a better understanding of the enigmatic mound. It also contextualises it within the changes, social processes and characteristics of the historical circumstances occurring at an overall pan-European level during the third millennium BC. These transformations have a connection with the European Bell Beaker Culture, and Mjeltehaugen will be assessed as a possible indication of Bell Beaker expansion to the north, along the Norwegian coast.
Rediscovering Heritage through Artefacts, Sites, and Landscapes: Translating a 3500-year Record at Ritidian, Guam by Mike T. Carson. xiv+176 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white with 114 plates in colour. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784916640. Book contents pageDownload

The Ritidian Site in Guam contains multiple layers and components that together reveal the full scope of traditional cultural heritage in the Mariana Islands in the northwest tropical Pacific since 1500 B.C., dating from the beginning of human settlement of the Remote Pacific Islands. The material records of changing artefacts, sites, and landscapes here have been incorporated into a cohesive narrative in chronological order, mirroring the experience of visiting a museum to learn about the profound heritage of this special site and its larger research contributions. The primary data findings are presented as a translation or visitor’s guide of encountering a complex, multi-layered, and multi-vocal past.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £35.00.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Note for downloading: PDF displays best in Chrome. For best results right-click 'Download (pdf)' below and use the option 'Save link as...' to save a local copy to your computer/device. Please ensure file has finished downloading before opening and be sure to use desktop PDF reading software rather than browser-based software, otherwise file may appear corrupted.
Substantive Evidence of Initial Habitation in the Remote Pacific: Archaeological Discoveries at Unai Bapot in Saipan, Mariana Islands by Mike T. Carson and Hsiao-chun Hung. xii+180 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (91 plates in colour). Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784916664. Book contents pageDownload

At the Unai Bapot Site of the Mariana Islands, new excavation has clarified the oldest known instance of a residential habitation prior to 1500 B.C. in the Remote Pacific, previously difficult to document in deeply buried layers that originally had comprised near-tidal to shallow subtidal zones. The initial habitation at this site, as well as at others in the Mariana Islands, pre-dated the next Remote Oceanic archaeological evidence by about four centuries and in an entirely different part of the Pacific than previously had been claimed. The newest excavation at Unai Bapot in 2016 has revealed the precise location of an ancient seashore habitation, containing dense red-slipped pottery, other artefacts, food midden, and arrangements of hearths, pits, and post moulds in three distinguishable archaeological layers all pre-dating 1100 B.C. and extending just prior to 1500 B.C. The new discoveries are presented here in detail, as a substantive basis for learning about a rarely preserved event of the initial cultural inhabitation of a region, in this case in the Remote Oceanic environment of the world with its own set of unique challenges.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £35.00.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Note for downloading: PDF displays best in Chrome. For best results right-click 'Download (pdf)' below and use the option 'Save link as...' to save a local copy to your computer/device. Please ensure file has finished downloading before opening and be sure to use desktop PDF reading software rather than browser-based software, otherwise file may appear corrupted.
A Crowded Desert: early results from survey and excavation of nomadic sites in north-west Qatar (poster) Taken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 47 2017 edited by Julian Jansen van Rensburg, Harry Munt, and Janet Starkey. Pages 43-50.Download

By Jose C. Carvajal Lopez, Kirk Roberts, Gareth Rees, Frank Stremke, Anke Marsh, Laura Morabito, Andrew Bevan, Mark Altaweel, Rodney Harrison, Manuel Arroyo-Kalin, Robert Carter, Richard Fletcher & Faisal Abdullah al-Naimi

This paper presents the results and preliminary conclusions of the 2016 season of the Crowded Desert Project, which aimed to find out about nomadic occupation and its relations with settled peoples in the region. Activities included extensive and intensive surveys and excavations in the area delimited by the areas of Umm al-MāΜ and MulayΉa in the north-west desert of the Qatar peninsula. Conclusions so far complement and expand the ideas developed during the pilot season of the project in 2015, and also provide finer chronological detail and a wider coverage of the area of research than before. The distribution of glass, metal, and pottery recovered showed important chronological differences in the patterns of occupation of the landscape. The paper also presents observed differences in the spatial distribution of features, showing how cairns (presumably pre-Islamic tombs), Islamic burials and cemeteries, and mosques and places of prayer (sing. muΒallā, pl. muΒallayāt) are distributed with respect to the tents and spaces habitation found. Finally, this paper introduces the first stratigraphic and geoarchaeological assessments undertaken in the area. Stratigraphic sequences are hard to find, and often nothing remains of them around any preserved structures. In cases where some have been found, their interpretation is restricted by their poor state of preservation and the constraints imposed by small trenches. A geoarchaeological programme is being developed in the hope of overcoming these problems and providing environmental information that might be useful for the understanding of the history of the region.
Auxiliaries and their forts: expression of identity? Taken from Roman Frontier Studies 2009 edited by Nick Hodgson, Paul Bidwell and Judith Schachtmann. Pages 229-235.Download

By Julia Chorus

Little is known about the origin of the pre-Flavian troops in the auxiliary forts in the Lower Rhine delta (The Netherlands). For the greater part this also applies to the transition phase just after the Batavian Revolt, in the early seventies AD. At that time the forts were all built in timber, so hardly any epigraphic evidence shows up during excavations. Can research on building techniques and their possible background fill a gap in the knowledge on the military occupation in the Rhine delta? When comparing the defences and internal buildings of the forts in the research area and also outside that region, the variety of building techniques is striking. Instead of environmental circumstances this must above all be due to the differences between the soldiers. Comparison with late Iron Age building techniques (fortifications, houses) shows some interesting relations between forts, soldiers, their possible recruitment area and building traditions. The ramparts of the forts, for instance, provide information on their builders and seem to show the origin of the builders/soldiers in the fort. They must have built their forts according to the tradition of their ancestors and meanwhile expressed their identity.
SOMA 2014. Proceedings of the 18th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology Wrocław – Poland, 24-26 April 2014 edited by Blazej Stanislawski and Hakan Öniz. viii+192 pages; illustrated throughout with 35 plates in colour. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784914950. Book contents pageDownload

The 18th annual meeting of the Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology (SOMA) was held in Wrocław-Poland, 24th to 26th April 2014.

Since prehistoric times the Mediterranean has acted as a stage for intense interactions between groups inhabiting regions that are now studied mainly within various sub-fields of ancient studies. In recent years, however, the development of research techniques and analytical models of archaeological evidence have identified similar historical paths that are similar, if not, in some cases, common to these disparate areas of the ancient world from West (Iberian peninsula) to East (Anatolia and Levant), from North (Europe, Black Sea Coast) to South (Maghreb and Egypt).

The 18th SOMA provided a forum for presentations related to the above-mentioned topics, as well as general themes such as the role of the sea, trade, colonization, even piracy, using archaeological data collected within contexts associated with the Mediterranean Basin and the area referred to as the Ancient Near East, ranging chronologically from the Prehistoric to Medieval periods. This current volume contains 22 papers selected from the 90 presented.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £28.00.

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Bronze Age metal workshops in Denmark between 1500–1300 BC: elite-controlled craft on Zealand Taken from New Perspectives on the Bronze Age edited by Sophie Bergerbrant and Anna Wessman. Pages 127-142.Download

By Heide Wrobel Nørgaard

In an investigation of ornaments originating in the Nordic Bronze Age (1500–1300 BC), residues of the crafting process were collected and compared in order to detect the individual in metalcraft, their workshops and the dissemination area of each workshop. The material from Zealand revealed particularly high-quality workmanship combined with indications of a large investment of time in crafting. It was possible to identify three distinct workshops on Zealand with the help of stylistic and technological peculiarities. In addition, the combination of identical tool traces, similar technological behaviour, the appearance of skilled and unskilled work and traces of the exchange of knowledge provided clues regarding the organisational structure of each workshop.
Identifying commoners in the Early Bronze Age: burials outside barrows Taken from New Perspectives on the Bronze Age edited by Sophie Bergerbrant and Anna Wessman. Pages 37-64.Download

By Sophie Bergerbrant, Kristian Kristiansen, Morten E. Allentoft, Karin M. Frei, T. Douglas Price, Karl-Göran Sjögren and Anna Tornberg

This article discusses the possibility of social division and the presence of commoners in south Scandinavia during the Early Bronze Age. The discussion is based on new scientific and archaeological data generated in the project Travels, transmissions and transformations in temperate northern Europe during the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC: The rise of Bronze Age societies. Based on a comprehensive radiocarbon dating program, we were able to re-assign many skeletons, previously assumed to be Late Neolithic, to the Bronze Age. This accounted for a significant proportion of non-elite burials (including those of children) that had previously been ‘mysteriously’ missing in the archaeological Bronze Age record. Moreover, strontium isotope analyses reveal that individuals seem to be mobile regardless of their wealth status and burial rituals. It suggests a society where workers and perhaps even nonfree labourers were mobile, not only the elite segment.
The Creation of the First (Divinatory) Dream and Enki(g) as the God of Ritual Wisdom Taken from Ash-sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East: Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini. Pages 155-161.Download

By Annette Zgoll

A close reading of the Sumerian version of the Flood Myth shows the god Enki(g) as the creator of the first divinatory dream. Enki(g)’s wisdom is precisely to be understood in this particular way, as ritual wisdom. In addition, Enki(g)’s/Ea’s trick in order to disclose the secrets of the gods without breaking his oath becomes comprehensible: it uses a clever combination of two different types of oracular devices.
The Kivik tomb: Bredarör enters into the digital arena — documented with OLS, SfM and RTI Taken from New Perspectives on the Bronze Age edited by Sophie Bergerbrant and Anna Wessman. Pages 289-305.Download

By Ulf Bertilsson, Johan Ling, Catarina Bertilsson, Rich Potter and Christian Horn

The Bredarör cairn in Kivik sparked the interest of researchers by presenting the rare combination of rock art within a burial context. A recent documentation project that employed the traditional tracing method has sparked a new debate about the precision of older tracings and frottages. This paper presents the results of a holistic recording of the slabs in the Bredarör cairn using three modern methods: Structure from Motion (SfM), Optical Laser Scanning (OLS) and Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI).

In discussing SfM, OLS and RTI, the paper demonstrates the power of these tools to expand the capabilities to record rock art in an unbiased fashion and in greater detail. In contrast to older methods, the depth and texture of features on the rock are documented and human error is reduced, because everything is recorded.

Some observations of the earlier documentation efforts were confirmed, and more details added, such as information on ship prows and horse design. This allowed an in-depth discussion of the dating and use of rock art in the Bredarör cairn. It is argued that although there is evidence that the slabs were transformed several times, the majority of the carving activity was carried out during Period II of the Nordic Bronze Age. It suggests that an important individual, possibly connected to long-distance trade, was interred in the cairn that subsequently served as a necropolis until the Late Bronze Age.
Tracing boundaries of local group identities in the Early Bronze Age — south-west Norway Taken from New Perspectives on the Bronze Age edited by Sophie Bergerbrant and Anna Wessman. Pages 421-434.Download

By Knut Ivar Austvoll

This article explores the construction of boundaries between local group identities through the burial practice of south-west Norway in the Early Bronze Age. It is argued that active choices were made in the consolidation of groups that had both direct and indirect effects on choices made by neighbouring groups. By drawing on theoretical tools from poststructuralism and anthropology, boundary maintenance is detected in the archaeological record. This is investigated through the construction of burials, treatment of the deceased and gender categorisation. This is set against a background of a highly dynamic and interconnected region with ties to a broader Nordic Bronze Age world. The patterns found point to a region where choices in burial practice reflect real ongoing developments in the social organisation of local Bronze Age societies.
The Archaeology of Time Travel Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century edited by Bodil Petersson and Cornelius Holtorf. viii+318 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915018. Book contents pageDownload


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This volume explores the relevance of time travel as a characteristic contemporary way to approach the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practiced time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-orientated and critical approaches to the past. Papers discuss the implications and problems associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travelling and whether time travel is inherently conservative because of its escapist tendencies, or whether it might instead be considered as a fulfilment of the contemporary Experience or Dream Society. Whatever position one may take, time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way to bring the past back to life in the present.

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Introduction
Chapter 1: The Meaning of Time Travel (Cornelius Holtorf)

Part One: Emerging Possibilities in Virtual Time Travels
Chapter 2: Time Travel Using 3D Methodologies – Visualising the Medieval Context of a Baptismal Font (Nicoló Dell’Unto, Ing-Marie Nilsson† and Jes Wienberg)
Chapter 3: The Kivik Grave, Virtual Bodies in Ritual Procession – Towards New Artistic Interactive Experiences for Time Travellers (Magali Ljungar-Chapelon)
Commentary: Time Travel Paradoxes and Archaeology (Per Stenborg)
Commentary: Taking Us to the Past and the Past to Us (Isto Huvila)

Part Two: Time Travel as an Educational Method
Chapter 4: Use the Past, Create the Future – The Time Travel Method, a Tool for Learning, Social Cohesion and Community Building (Ebbe Westergren)
Chapter 5: To Make and to Experience Meaning – How Time Travels are Perceived amongst Participants (Niklas Ammert and Birgitta E. Gustafsson)
Commentary: Forming Bridges through Time Travel (Cecilia Trenter)

Part Three: Living the Distant Past
Chapter 6: Performing the Past – Time Travels in Archaeological Open-air Museums (Stefanie Samida)
Arqueología urbana en el área central de la Ciudad de Córdoba, Argentina Excavaciones en la Sede Corporativa del Banco de la Provincia de Córdoba (2014-2016) by Andrés D. Izeta, Eduardo A. Pautassi, G. Roxana Cattáneo, Andrés I. Robledo, José María Caminoa, Julián Mignino and Isabel E. Prado. 256 pages; illustrated throughout with 119 plates in colour. Spanish text with English abstract. Available both in print and Open Access. South American Archaeology Series 29. ISBN 9781784916091. Book contents pageDownload

This work is part of a line of action proposed by the Institute of Anthropology of Córdoba (IDACOR), doubly dependent executing unit of the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET) and the National University of Cordoba (UNC). This action requires the intervention of professional archaeologists in order to evaluate the impact produced by subsurface excavation in cases related to the development of real estate projects.

Within this framework, in February 2014, there was the need to implement an archeological impact study on land under cadastral nomenclature 04-04-020-023 in the city of Cordoba, Argentina. The study was conducted in two instances. The first took place between the months of April and June 2014, consisting of various actions related to the systematic archaeological excavation, registration, conservation and interpretation of material culture recovered in depths between the surface and about 2.5 / 3m deep. The second stage, implemented between February and August 2015, consisted of the monitoring of the excavation while using heavy machinery allowed archaeologists to reach greater depths. The results of these tasks were submitted to the local authorities in five partial reports presented collectively here in order to have all the information available in one volume.

As a result of the excavations it was possible to retrieve information about land use in the last two hundred years. Previous occupations have been masked or destroyed mostly by architectural interventions in the mid-nineteenth century and early twentieth century. However more than 30,000 objects recovered during the archaeological project help us to interpret the life of the people who inhabited these spaces, as well as local and international production and trade networks where they were integrated.

Along with this, it was possible to recover significant portions of architectural structures that probably correspond to the eighteenth century, being the oldest constructive feature found on the parcel. This action, perhaps the most difficult due to the sheer scale of the objects, allowed the implementation of a novel technique for the recovery of archaeological objects in the city of Córdoba.

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Sig y análisis espacial en la arqueología de cazadores recolectores de Magallania (extremo sur de Sudamérica) by María Cecilia Pallo. 426 pages; illustrated throughout with 102 plates in colour. Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access. South American Archaeology Series 28. ISBN 9781784916077. Book contents pageDownload

Magallania defines the region between the Santa Cruz river basin to the north and the Fuegian expression of the Andes to the south. It is one of the southernmost spaces in the world and the last to be occupied by humans, a process that occurred at least at the end of the Pleistocene (11,000 to 9,000 AP) and before the complete formation of the Strait of Magellan (ca. 8000 AP). Thereafter, the Strait functioned as a biogeographic barrier, creating conditions for divergent cultural evolution between the populations of the mainland and Tierra del Fuego. For this reason, the archeology of Magallania offers a unique possibility to inquire about the relationship between the environmental dynamics and the spatial organization of populations of hunter-gatherers settled on both sides of the Strait of Magellan.

Spanish Description: En su versión original, Magallania es el nombre acuñado por Martinic para definir la región comprendida entre la cuenca del río Santa Cruz al norte hasta la expresión fueguina de la cordillera de los Andes al sur. Es uno de los espacios más australes del mundo y de los últimos en ser ocupados por humanos, proceso que ocurrió al menos a fines del Pleistoceno (11.000 a 9.000 AP) y antes de la completa formación del estrecho de Magallanes (ca. 8000 AP). A partir de entonces el Estrecho funcionó como una barrera biogeográfica, creando condiciones para que ocurra la evolución cultural divergente entre las poblaciones del continente y la Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego. Por este motivo, la arqueología de Magallania ofrece una posibilidad única para indagar acerca de la relación entre la dinámica ambiental y la organización espacial de las poblaciones de cazadores recolectores asentadas a un lado y otro del estrecho de Magallanes.

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Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

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Aportes del enfoque tecnológico a la arqueología precolombina pasado y presente de la alfarería en el valle del río Cuyes y su región (Andes sur-orientales del ecuador) by Catherine Lara. viii+240 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 15 colour plates. Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access. Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 47. ISBN 9781784916114. Book contents pageDownload

Located in the Northwest of South America (Ecuador), the Cuyes River Valley acts as a transition corridor between the Andean and Amazon regions. This research attempts to determine the ethnic origin of the pre-Columbian inhabitants of the Cuyes valley through the application of a method of ceramic analysis completely new in the region: the technological approach.

Spanish description: Ubicado en el noroeste de Suramérica (Ecuador), el valle del río Cuyes constituye una zona de transición entre los Andes y la Amazonia. La presente investigación busca determinar el origen étnico de los habitantes precolombinos del valle a través de la aplicación de un método de análisis cerámico inédito en la región: el enfoque tecnológico.

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The Sunshade after the Old Kingdom – Female Attribute with Hathoric Connotation? Taken from Egypt 2015: Perspectives of Research by Mladen Tomorad and Joanna Popielska-Grzybowska. Pages 161-173.Download

By Lubica Hudáková

Abstract: The motif of a male sunshade bearer accompanying the tomb owner or his relatives is attested from the early 5th dynasty until the early Middle Kingdom, and in the related depictions the sunshade has a practical shielding function. The gradual abandonment of the motif coincides with the appearance of female sunshade bearers that start to be represented from the First Intermediate Period onwards. The context of the scenes in which these women appear, along with their iconography and associated inscriptions, indicate that the sunshade became a Hathoric attribute some time after the end of the Old Kingdom and fulfilled this function well into the 18th dynasty.
Virginia Woolf and the cooking range Taken from Not just Porridge: English Literati at Table edited by Francesca Orestano and Michael Vickers. Pages 125-133.Download

By Francesca Orestano

It’s difficult to imagine Virginia Woolf standing before a cooking range, for two reasons. On the one hand, the image of the writer endorsed by much criticism is that of an intellectual, thoughtful, witty, a prey to her nerves and to depression, and possibly to anorexia: and critics dwell on her literary achievement, leaving aside the material sphere of food, apart from some biographical information (Lee 1996) or because of its symbolic value (Glenny 1999). On the other hand, how can we imagine that the woman we consider a leading figure of modern feminism might accept the humble domestic chores of cooking? – the woman who installed a printing press in her drawing room, thus sending into exile the ottoman and the whatnot, and the eternal tea table, inherited from the Victorian age?
At table with Dr Johnson: food for the body, nourishment for the mind Taken from Not just Porridge: English Literati at Table edited by Francesca Orestano and Michael Vickers. Pages 17-34.Download

By Giovanni Iamartino

Samuel Johnson epitomises the spirit of the eighteenth century in England. His life (1709-1784) spans three quarters of the century; his literary and critical output both embodies and shapes the taste of the day, connecting himself and his readers to other great names of the English and European literary traditions. His famous Dictionary of the English Language (Johnson 1755) provides evidence of both the linguistic usage of his world and the literary and scientific culture which lay at the heart of that world. Extraordinary as a writer, therefore; but also unique as a man, both for his personality and the events of his life, and for the fact that a number of differing accounts of this personality and these events were compiled and published from soon after Johnson’s death in 1784. Most outstanding and best known is James Boswell’s The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., first published in 1791; but we must not forget that this work was preceded, and also followed, by many other versions of the life of the man who was already recognised as exceptional by his contemporaries.
The Peshdar Plain Project, 2015-2016. A Major Neo-Assyrian Settlement on the Empire’s Eastern Border Taken from Ash-sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East: Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini. Pages 124-130.Download

By Karen Radner, Janoscha Kreppner and Andrea Squitieri.

The Peshdar district is part of the province of Sulaymaniyah in the Kurdish Autonomous Region of Iraq. It is situated directly on the border with Iran (Figure 1). The Peshdar Plain Project was inaugurated in 2015 and aims to uncover the ancient history of this understudied area with a focus on the 9th-7th centuries BC when the Neo-Assyrian Empire controlled the region.