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NEW: Reindeer hunters at Howburn Farm, South Lanarkshire A Late Hamburgian settlement in southern Scotland – its lithic artefacts and natural environment by Torben Bjarke Ballin with contributions by Alan Saville, Richard Tipping, Tam Ward, Rupert Housley, Lucy Verrill, Matthew Bradley, Clare Wilson, Paul Lincoln and Alison MacLeod. Hardback; 205x290mm; xx+124 pages; 47 illustrations, 25 tables (13 plates in colour). 433 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919016. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919023. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents the lithic assemblage from Howburn in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, which at present is the oldest prehistoric settlement in Scotland (12,700-12,000 BC), and the only Hamburgian settlement in Britain. The site also included a scatter from the Late Upper Palaeolithic Federmesser- Gruppen period (12,000-10,800 BC), as well as lithics from the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. The book focuses on the Hamburgian finds, which are mainly based on the exploitation of flint from Doggerland, the then dry bed of the North Sea. The Hamburgian tools include tanged arrowheads, scrapers, piercers, burins, and other implement forms which show similarities with tools of the same age on the European continent. The shape of one scatter suggests that the Palaeolithic settlers lived in tent-like structures. The Palaeolithic finds from Howburn shed light on several important general trends, such as the ‘acclimatization’ of pioneer settlers, as well as the development of regional differences following the initial Late Glacial recolonization of Scotland. Palaeo-environmental work focused on whether there was a small lake (‘Loch Howburn’) in front of the terrace on which the camp was situated, and it was concluded that there was indeed a lake there, but it was neither contemporary with the Hamburgian, nor the Federmesser-Gruppen settlement. Most likely, ‘Loch Howburn’ dates to the Loch Lomond stadial.

About the Author
After having worked as a specialist and Project Manager in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Norway, Torben Ballin relocated to Scotland in 1998. Since that year, he has worked as an independent lithics specialist in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland, and he is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Bradford. Torben’s special interests have been lithic terminology and typology, lithic technology, chronological frameworks, raw material studies, intra-site spatial analyses, prehistoric territories and exchange networks, and – not least – Scotland’s Late Upper Palaeolithic (LUP) and Early Mesolithic industries. While still active in Denmark, he briefly worked with Jørgen Holm at the Hamburgian/Federmesser-Gruppen site of Slotseng in Southern Jutland, and one of his academic theses was on the refitting and spatial analysis of the LUP Brommian settlement of Højgård on Zealand. While in Norway, he led the Farsund Project and the Oslofjord Crossing Project, where he analysed a large number of Norwegian Early, Middle and Late Mesolithic sites and assemblages. Since 1998, Torben has dealt with numerous Mesolithic sites and assemblages from all parts of Scotland, and lately he has focused on the discovery of Scottish LUP sites, assemblages, and individual finds and, with the late Alan Saville of National Museums Scotland he published the Federmesser-Gruppen site of Kilmelfort Cave, Argyll; with Hein Bjerck, University of Trondheim, the unique LUP Fosna-Hensbacka point from Brodgar on Orkney; and with Headland Archaeology Ltd. the LUP site of Milltimber, Aberdeenshire. Torben has recently published a number of papers in which he discussed how to recognize individual LUP finds and assemblages on the basis of their technological attributes, when no diagnostic types are present.

The following co-authors took part in the production of the Howburn monograph: The late Alan Saville, National Museums Scotland; Richard Tipping, University of Stirling; Tam Ward, Biggar Archaeology Group; Rupert Housley, Royal Holloway, University of London; Lucy Verrill, University of Stirling; Matthew Bradley, University of Stirling; Clare Wilson, University of Stirling; Paul Lincoln, University of Portsmouth; and Alison MacLeod, University of Reading.
FORTHCOMING: The Archaeology of Prehistoric Burnt Mounds in Ireland by Alan Hawkes. Paperback; 210x297mm; viii+328 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (73 plates in colour). (Print RRP £50.00). 460 2018. ISBN 9781784919863. Book contents pageBuy Now

This book details the archaeology of burnt mounds (fulachtaí fia) in Ireland, one of the most frequent and under researched prehistoric site types in the country. It presents a re-evaluation of the pyrolithic phenomenon in light of some 1000 excavated burnt mounds. Charcoal-enriched soil, along with spreads and mounds of heat-affected stone, are one of the most common types of site found in Ireland, largely as a consequence of numerous discoveries made in the course of road building. They represent an accumulation of firing material associated with a prehistoric pyrolithic technology, which involved a process of heat transfer that centred on the use of hot stones immersed in water-filled troughs or placed in small, lined/unlined pits/ovens. During the Bronze Age, the use of this technology became widely adopted in Northern Europe, particularly Ireland, where the phenomenon is represented in the field as a low crescent-shaped mound.

Even though burnt mounds are the most common prehistoric site type in Ireland, they have not received the same level of research as other prehistoric sites. This is primarily due to the paucity of artefact finds and the unspectacular nature of the archaeological remains, compounded by the absence of an appropriate research framework. This is the most comprehensive study undertaken on the use of pyrolithic technology in prehistoric Ireland, dealing with different aspects of site function, chronology, social role and cultural context.

About the Author
Alan Hawkes is a PhD graduate from the Department of Archaeology, University College Cork. His thesis dealt with the archaeology of burnt mounds and the use of pyrolithic technology in prehistoric Ireland. Since completing his doctoral studies, he has published a number of papers related to his research and has worked as an assistant researcher on a number of archaeology projects. In 2016, he established the Rathcoran Hillfort Project with Dr James O’Driscoll, which aims to address the dating of Ireland's only unfinished hillfort. He is currently working as a consultant archaeologist.
FORTHCOMING: The Law of Treasure by A.G. Guest with the assistance of Paul Matthews. Paperback; 175x245mm; x+152 pages. 459 2018. ISBN 9781784919740. Book contents pageBuy Now

The importance of the Law of Treasure is largely the result of the spectacular growth in the activity of metal detecting which, starting in the 1960’s, has grown so much in popularity that it now brings to our knowledge each year more than a thousand objects of historical, cultural or archaeological interest. The nature and volume of these finds has in turn led to a greater public concern to ensure that measures exist which will be conducive to the retention and effective preservation of the more important of those objects.

It is, of course, essential that facilities exist for the physical examination and conservation of finds and that those facilities should be accessible and adequate. But the law has an important part to play in this process by ensuring that finds of substantial value or importance should be preserved for the nation and made available to the public in museums.

For many hundreds of years, the Law of Treasure was the common law of treasure trove. Today it is essentially based on the Treasure Act 1996. Although the Act is a great improvement on the common law it is nevertheless not always rational and the meaning of some of its provisions is sometimes obscure. This book aims to provide a reliable guide to the Law of Treasure in England, Wales and Northern Ireland and also to explain the role played by legal institutions, such as the Coroner, in that process.

This book will be of interest to archaeologists, museums, coroner’s offices, finds liaison officers, farmers and landlords’ associations. It will also be of interest and utility to metal detectorists since, in addition to explaining what objects are considered to be treasure by the law, it explains the legal restrictions on searching for artefacts, the duty to report finds of treasure and the structure of the valuation process and rewards.
FORTHCOMING: The Roman Pottery Manufacturing Site in Highgate Wood: Excavations 1966-78 by A E Brown and H L Sheldon. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+392 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 456 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 43. ISBN 9781784919788. Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations over a period of eight years uncovered at least ten pottery kilns, waster heaps, ditches and pits, but only a few definite structures. The pottery from the site indicates a period of operation extending from the first half of the 1st century AD to the later 2nd century. The pottery made at the site included initially a vegetable tempered handmade ware, but subsequently the bulk of it consisted of a grog tempered ware and then pottery in a sandy fabric which is well known from assemblages in London. The type of kiln varied with the pottery fabric; there was possible evidence for a pre-Roman pit firing, and later kilns set in ditches were of the twin flued type, eventually replaced by the more familiar above ground kilns with raised floors. Changes in pottery fabric were reflected in different methods of clay preparation, which led to changes in the function of the various ditches, the stratigraphy of which, along with the variation in the fabrics, was significant in enabling the four broad phases into which the site has been divided, to be proposed.

The report includes a very detailed analysis of the forms and fabrics of the pottery made at Highgate. Finds of prehistoric flintwork and pottery during the excavation, and of material of later date, together with the observation of earthworks and historical research, have been used to show the place of the pottery kilns as an element in the exploitation of the woodland of northern London over the last eight thousand years.

About the Authors
TONY BROWN was a member of the academic staff of the University of Leicester for over thirty years, moving there in 1964 as an Assistant Staff Tutor (Organising Tutor for Leicestershire). In 1966 he became Organising Tutor for Northamptonshire and in 1968 Staff Tutor in Archaeology. From 1990 he held a joint appointment with the School of Archaeological Studies, retiring in 2001 as an Emeritus Reader. During the earlier part of this period he engaged in rescue excavations for the Department of the Environment (Roman pottery kilns at Harrold in Bedfordshire and the Roman small town of Towcester in Northamptonshire), thereafter co
NEW: The Search for Winchester’s Anglo-Saxon Minsters by Martin Biddle with illustrations by Simon Hayfield. iv+76pp; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £15.00). 420 2018 Winchester Excavations Committee Publication . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918576. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918583. £8.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £15.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient cathedral of Old Minster and the abbey church of New Minster once stood at the heart of Anglo-Saxon Winchester. Buildings of the first importance, honoured by Anglo-Saxon and Norman kings, these great churches were later demolished and their locations lost. Through an extensive programme of archaeological excavation begun in 1961, and as a result of years of research, the story of these lost minsters can now be revealed. Written by Martin Biddle, Director of the Winchester Excavations Committee and Research Unit, and marvellously illustrated by Simon Hayfield, The Search for Winchester’s Anglo-Saxon Minsters traces the history of these excavations from 1961 to 1970 and shows how they led to the discovery of the Old and New Minsters, bringing back to life the history, archaeology and architecture of Winchester’s greatest Anglo-Saxon buildings.

About the Author
PROFESSOR MARTIN BIDDLE is an Emeritus Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford, and Honorary Fellow of Pembroke College, Cambridge. He was the first Lecturer in Medieval Archaeology in England, at the University of Exeter (1963–67) and has held many other distinguished academic positions worldwide. He is the Founder and Director of the Winchester Excavations Committee (1962–present) and the Winchester Research Unit (1968–present). Professor Biddle is also Chairman of the Fabric Advisory Committee (FAC) for Winchester Cathedral, Archaeological Consultant for St Albans Cathedral, and former Archaeological Consultant for Canterbury Cathedral.

SIMON HAYFIELD is an experienced draughtsman who trained as a technical illustrator in the 1970s. He has spent most of his career working as a freelance artist, but has also worked at several top Midland advertising agencies, and lectured part time at the Birmingham College of Art. A love of history led him to archaeological illustration, in which he has worked with a number of senior scholars producing artist’s impressions, finds drawings, elevations and plans for publication. Simon Hayfield began his career in archaeological illustration working with the Winchester Research Unit in 1975 and continues to work with the Unit to this day preparing illustrations for volumes in the series of ‘Winchester Studies’.

Table of Contents
Preface; Introduction; Anglo-Saxon Winchester; Archaeological excavations and finds; Understanding the evidence; Evolution of Old Minster; Destruction of Old Minster; The Royal Quarter; Winchester Studies; Further Reading
NEW: An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas edited by Andy M Jones and Henrietta Quinnell. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+286 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 418 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918613. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918620. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Charles Thomas (1928-2016) was a Cornishman and archaeologist, whose career from the 1950s spanned nearly seven decades. This period saw major developments that underpin the structures of archaeology in Britain today, in many of which he played a pivotal part. He campaigned for the Chair of Cornish Studies at the University of Exeter, which he then held from 1972 until retirement, after teaching archaeology at Edinburgh and Leicester Universities.

The ‘Intellectual Adventure in Archaeology’ was to Charles the mental stimulation of developing narratives for the past, especially in the areas in which he was a leading authority, including the early church in Britain, the early medieval period more generally, and Cornish studies. The contributions to this volume demonstrate the extent to which his scholarship and character has underpinned the work of others, in Cornwall and beyond. Contributions come from life-long friends and from archaeologists at all of stages of their careers. Their subjects are predominantly Cornish, Gwithian, Tintagel and Scilly, but also range from Scotland to Southern France. The whole is brought to life by a series of Charles’ watercolours, previously unpublished.

The volume should appeal to all those interested in the development of archaeology in the later 20th century and of Cornwall from prehistory to its distinctive present.

About the Editors
ANDY JONES BA PhD FSA MCIfA is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His PhD focused on the Earlier Bronze Age barrow and monument complexes in Cornwall and South West Britain. His research interests include the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods, as well as the archaeology of the upland and coastal areas of western Britain. Significant publications include ‘Settlement and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond’ and ‘Preserved in the Peat: an Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill, Dartmoor, and its Wider Context’. He recently worked with Charles Thomas on the North Cliffs project.

HENRIETTA QUINNELL BA FSA MCIfA was formerly Lecturer in Archaeology at the Department of Adult Education, Exeter University. Her acquaintance with the late Charles Thomas began in the late 1960s. She has worked in South West Britain ever since, is an authority on the prehistory of the region and has published extensively. She now works as a consultant for the region’s prehistoric ceramics.

Table of Contents
Foreword – by Caroline Dudley
Andy M Jones and Henrietta Quinnell – A miscellany of papers
Nicholas Johnson – Charles Thomas 1928–2016: The sixty-year archaeological adventure of a Cornish polymath
Andy M Jones – To the North Cliffs!
Roger Mercer – Looking at the Cornish Early Neolithic from all directions
Vanessa Straker and Thomas Walker – Gwithian’s environmental history: Landscape change and farming
Henrietta Quinnell – Before the Early Christian cemetery site on Lundy Island
Jacqueline A Nowakowski – Working in the shadows of the giants: Charles Thomas, Courtenay Arthur Ralegh Radford (and King Arthur) – past and current archaeological fieldwork at Tintagel, Cornwall
Charles Thomas† and Charles Johns – Archaeological investigations on Teän, Isles of Scilly, 1956
Ewan Campbell and Adrián Maldonado – Charles Thomas in North Britain: A career in the making
Anna Tyacke – My memorial stone to Charles
Ann Preston-Jones – St Piran’s Cross: A Cornish Icon Re-considered
Thomas Goskar – A little less mute: 3D capture and enhancement of Cornwall's inscribed and decorated stones
Oliver Padel – The name of Annet (Scilly)
Peter Fowler – Deserted Settlement in an Antique land: Elements of a post-Roman field archaeology on le Causee Méjean, Languedoc, France
Martin Bell – Coastal Archaeology in South West England: Charles Thomas and other inspirations
Timothy Darvill – Lift up mine eyes unto the hills: Archaeology and th
FORTHCOMING: Metal Sewing-Thimbles Found in Britain by Brian Read; principal illustrator: Mike Trevarthen. Paperback; 203x273mm; viii+88 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (26 colour plates). (Print £25.00). 450 2018. ISBN 9781784919450. Book contents pageBuy Now

This is the first reference book that deals specifically with all types of sewing-thimble made from copper-alloy or silver, or either of these metals combined with iron or steel, and found in Britain: also included is a seemingly rare gold specimen. Domed, ring-type and open-top (here the latter classed as a new type) sewing-thimbles are described, among them unusual examples and others previously absent from the known record. From Britain the earliest reliable dating for these humble yet fascinating tools is between c.1270 – c.1350, and continues through the medieval and early post-medieval periods and into the 18th and 19th centuries.

Dating from at least the 17th century, subjected to detailed attention is the largely neglected sailmakers’ and sailors’ palm-iron, a heavy-duty tool made from either iron, steel or copper alloy. Also described are the two known types of silver or copper-alloy finger guard, an 18th – 19th century tool used in conjunction with finer sewing-thimbles.

The majority of sewing-thimbles and other sewing-tools catalogued here are credited to metal-detectorists or members of The Society of Thames Mudlarks, who also use metal-detectors. To show constructional detail, each object is archaeologically drawn. This information is essential for metal-detectorists, archaeologists, museum curators, sewing-tool collectors and dealers, or anyone with an interest, seeking to gauge the type or age of any particular sewing-thimble or palm-iron.

About the Author
BRIAN READ was born in 1939 in Essex and raised in East and South-East London. With no formal educational qualifications, in 1954 he left Secondary Modern School and became a trainee millwright and then a trainee groundsman before joining the Merchant Navy in 1955 where he travelled widely. In 1961 he embarked on a fire service career, first with the Devon County Fire Service, then the City of Plymouth Fire Brigade, and finally the newly formed Devon Fire Brigade. While on duty in 1983, in the rank of assistant divisional officer, he sustained an injury that, in 1986, resulted in his medical discharge.

Since leaving the fire service he has worked as a freelance writer. His first book History Beneath Our Feet, published in 1988, was a bestseller and after extensive revision underwent re-publication in 1995 and again proved successful. Between 1999 – 2015 he self-published, under the imprint Portcullis Publishing.

From 1978, metal detecting and its associated study of small metal artefacture, has been his primary leisure interest.
FORTHCOMING: Disease, Disability and Medicine in Medieval Europe edited by Erin Connelly and Stefanie Künzel. Paperback; 175x245mm; 150pp. (Print RRP £29.00). 441 2018. ISBN 9781784918835. Buy Now

The majority of papers in this volume were originally presented at the eighth annual ‘Disease, Disability, and Medicine in Medieval Europe’ conference. The conference focused on infections, chronic illness, and the impact of infectious diseases on medieval society, including infection as a disability in the case of visible conditions, such as infected wounds, leprosy, syphilis, and tuberculosis. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this conference emphasised the importance of collaborative projects, novel avenues of research for treating infectious disease, and the value of considering medieval questions from the perspective of multiple disciplines. This volume aims to carry forward this interdisciplinary synergy by bringing together contributors from a variety of disciplines and from a diverse range of international institutions. Of note is the academic stage of the contributors in this volume. All the contributors were PhD candidates at the time of the conference, and the majority have completed or are in the final stages of completing their programmes at the time of this publication. The originality and calibre of research presented by these early career researchers demonstrates the promising future of the field, as well as the continued relevance of medieval studies for a wide range of disciplines and topics. Contributions by Stefanie Künzel, Marit Ronen, Cathrin Hähn, Rachel Welsh, Ninon Dubourg, Clara Jáuregui, Lucy Barnhouse, Cecilia Collins, Erin Connelly, and Christoph Wieselhuber.

About the Editors
ERIN CONNELLY is the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow for Data Curation in Medieval Studies in the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, University of Pennsylvania Libraries. She holds a PhD in English from the University of Nottingham with a special interest in medieval medical texts and the relevance of medieval medicine for modern infections (‘ancientbiotics’). Her doctoral project was the first edition of the 15th-century Middle English translation of Bernard of Gordon's Lilium medicinae, the Lylye of Medicynes (Bodleian Library MS Ashmole 1505). She collaborates on a wide range of interdisciplinary projects, including a ‘big data’ approach to analysing medieval medical texts and using multispectral imaging to categorise stains in medieval manuscripts.

STEFANIE KÜNZEL has recently finished her doctorate at the University of Nottingham. Her thesis explores concepts of disease in Anglo-Saxon literature and culture, focusing on metaphors pertaining primarily to the fields of infection and epidemics. She obtained her BA from the University of Bamberg in 2011 and subsequently completed an MA in Anglo-Saxon and Viking Studies at the University of Nottingham.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Foreword - Christina Lee
Introduction - Erin Connelly and Stefanie Künzel
Chapter 1 - Þu miht wiþ þam laþan ðe geond lond færð: Conceptualisations of Disease in Anglo-Saxon Charms - Stefanie Künzel
Chapter 2 - A Still Sound Mind: Personal Agency of Impaired People in Anglo-Saxon Care and Cure Narratives - Marit Ronen
Chapter 3 - Mobility Limitations and Assistive Aids in the Merovingian Burial Record - Cathrin Hähn
Chapter 4 - Tearing the Face in Grief and Rape: Cheek Rending in Medieval Iberia, c. 1000–1300 - Rachel Welsh
Chapter 5 - Clerical Leprosy and the Ecclesiastical Office: Dis/Ability and Canon Law - Ninon Dubourg
Chapter 6 - Inside the Leprosarium: Illness in the Daily Life of 14th Century Barcelona - Clara Jáuregui
Chapter 7 - Languages of Experience: Translating Medicine in MS Laud Misc 237 - Lucy Barnhouse
Chapter 8 - Heillög Bein, Brotin Bein: Manifestations of Disease in Medieval Iceland - Cecilia Collins
Chapter 9 - A Case Study of Plantago in the Treatment of Infected Wounds in the Middle English Translation of Bernard of Gordon’s Lilium medicinae - Erin Connelly
Chapter 10 - Miserum spectaculum, horrendus fetor, aspectus horrendus: “S
FORTHCOMING: Verres incolores de L’antiquité romaine en Gaule et aux marges de la Gaule by Danièle Foy, Françoise Labaune-Jean, Caroline Leblond, Chantal Martin Pruvot, Marie-Thérèse Marty, Claire Massart, Claudine Munier, Laudine Robin and Janick Roussel-Ode. Two volume set; Paperback; 205x290mm; xliv+738 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 118 colour plates. French text with English abstract. (Print RRP £130.00). 348 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 42. ISBN 9781784918972. Book contents pageBuy Now

Colourless glass became prominent between the middle of the 1st century AD and the beginning of the 4th century. This book reflects the diversity of glass and is designed as a practical manual divided into three parts: Assemblages, Typological Catalogue, Chemical Analyses.

The first presents contexts in which colourless glass has been found; the second, in the form of index cards, is a typological catalogue which gives an overall picture of the colourless glassware found throughout Gaul; glass is highly useful as a dating tool but also tells us much about the economic, social and cultural aspects of its time. Chemical analyses form the third component.

The volume of material gathered in this book makes it an indispensable working tool for researchers and students interested in the glassware of Roman antiquity.

A collective work by multiple scholars, this book results from an investigation initiated and mainly supported by the French Association for Glass Archaeology (Association française pour l’Archéologie du Verre) to which most of the authors belong as well as being attached to various research institutions.

Le verre incolore, volontairement décoloré au manganèse ou à l’antimoine, est celui qui est le plus souvent utilisé entre le milieu du Ier s. apr. J.-C. et le début du IVe s. Verres incolores de L’antiquité romaine en Gaule et aux marges de la Gaule rend compte de la diversité de ce mobilier (vaisselle, contenants et petits objets) est conçu comme un manuel pratique divisé en trois parties. La première présente des contextes renfermant du verre incolore ; la seconde, sous forme de fiches, est un catalogue typologique qui livre une image globale de la verrerie incolore découverte dans l’ensemble de la Gaule. Outil de datation, le verre nous informe aussi sur les aspects économiques, sociaux et culturels de son époque. Les analyses chimiques forment le troisième volet.

La masse documentaire réunie dans cet ouvrage en fait un instrument de travail indispensable aux chercheurs et étudiants qui s’intéressent au verre de l’Antiquité romaine.

Fruit d’un travail collectif, cet ouvrage résulte d’une enquête initiée et principalement supportée par l’Association française pour l’Archéologie du Verre (AFAV) à laquelle appartiennent la plupart des auteurs qui, par ailleurs, sont rattachés à divers organismes de recherche. L’AFAV qui publie régulièrement dans un bulletin les travaux de ses rencontres annuelles est également organisatrice de colloques internationaux et éditrice scientifique.
FORTHCOMING: Early Mesolithic Technical Systems of Southern France and Northern Italy by Davide Visentin. Paperback; xxiv+330 pages; 96 illustrations, 167 tables. (Print RRP £58.00). 59 2018. ISBN 9781784919276. Book contents pageBuy Now

The Sauveterrian represents one of the main cultural aspects of the European Early Mesolithic. In this work, its presumed uniformity—mostly based on typological grounds—is questioned with the purpose of assessing and verifying the relationships existing between the two central areas of diffusion of this complex: southern France and northern Italy. A broad technological approach, combining complementary analytical techniques, was applied to the study of a series of French and Italian lithic assemblages. More specifically, these were investigated with the aim of reconstructing the entire reduction sequences, from the procurement of lithic raw materials to the use and discard of tools.

Results indicate that the two regions responded to the same conceptual scheme and their respective lithic technical systems shared the same rationale: an extremely optimized technology, not opportunistic in the least, but issued from a careful strategic planning. Nonetheless, in the context of this generalized behaviour, a consistent variability can be found, marked by differences of both ‘stylistic’ and technical nature especially regarding the processes for producing microlithic armatures. At a general level, in the context of the important environmental changes that characterized the Late Glacial to Early Holocene transition, the emergence of Sauveterrian technology was fundamental in allowing the development of a complex settlement structure, characterized by a mobility system based on relatively short distances and with a strong logistic component.

About the Author DAVIDE VISENTIN did his PhD at the University of Ferrara and at the University of Toulouse Jean Jaurès (co-directed thesis). His research and publication interests are focused on Late Palaeolithic and Mesolithic hunter-gatherers’ technology and settlement systems as well as mountain archaeology. He currently collaborates with the University of Ferrara on multiple research projects, directs the excavations at the Epigravettian site of Landro on the Cansiglio plateau and works as a field archaeologist in north-eastern Italy.
NEW: Late Iron Age and Roman Settlement at Bozeat Quarry, Northamptonshire: Excavations 1995-2016 by Rob Atkins. xiv+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (55 colour plates). 429 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918958. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918965. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (formerly Northamptonshire Archaeology), has undertaken intermittent archaeological work within Bozeat Quarry over a twenty-year period from 1995-2016 covering an area of 59ha. The earliest archaeological features lay in the extreme northern area where a Bronze Age to Iron Age cremation burial was possibly contemporary with an adjacent late Bronze Age/early Iron Age pit alignment. In the middle to late Iron Age a settlement was established at the southern part of the site over a c170m by 150m area. It was a well organised farmstead, mostly open in plan with two roundhouses, routeway, enclosures, boundary ditches and pits.

In the early 1st century AD, cAD 30, two separate settlements lay c0.5km apart. The former southern Iron Age farmstead had perhaps shifted location c150m to the north-west and a there was new farmstead to the north. Both settlements were located on a west facing slope of a valley side and were sited on sands and gravels at between 64m and 66m aOD. The Northern Settlement was only occupied for about 150 years and was involved in pastoral farming, but local coarseware pottery production was of some importance with a group of 12 pottery kilns dated to the middle to late 1st century AD. This is seemingly the largest number of pottery kilns from a single settlement of this period yet found in the regionally important Upper Nene Valley pottery producing area.

The Southern Settlement was larger and continued to the end of the Roman period. In this area there was a notable scatter of 12 Iron Age and 1st century AD Roman coins as well as 24 contemporary brooches found over an area measuring c170m by c130m. This collection of finds may suggest the presence of a shrine or temple located in the area. It is perhaps significant that in 1964 directly to the west of the excavation, a middle Roman round stone building was found, perhaps an associated shrine. Within the excavation area in the latest Iron Age to early Roman period there was a possible roundhouse, a large oval enclosure and a field system. The latter largely related to pastoral farming including areas where paddocks were linked to routeways suggesting significant separation of livestock had occurred. Four cremation burials, including one deposited in a box, and an inhumation lay in three locations. Pastoral farming was a significant activity throughout the Roman period with enclosures, paddocks and linked routeways uncovered. In the late 2nd to 4th century there were two stone buildings and a stone malt oven at the extreme western extent of the site, within 50m to the east of the probably contemporary shrine recorded in 1964.

There was minor evidence of early to middle Saxon occupation within the area of the former middle to late Iron Age settlement. No structures were found, although a few pits may date to this period and mark short stay visits. A small cemetery of five individuals respected the former Roman field system and probably dated to the late 6th to 7th centuries. The burials included a decapitation and a burial with a knife and a buckle. The site was then not re-occupied and became part of the fields of Bozeat medieval and post-medieval settlements.
NEW: Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era edited by Liz Thomas and Jill Campbell. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+150 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (36 colour plates). 426 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918316. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918323. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era presents a series of papers reflecting the latest approaches to the study of buildings from the historic period. This volume does not examine buildings as architecture, but adopts an archaeological perspective to consider them as artefacts, reflecting the needs of those who commissioned them. Studies have often failed to consider the historical contexts in which the buildings were constructed and how they were subsequently used and interpreted. The papers in this volume situate their interpretation in their social context. Buildings can inform us about past cultures as they are responsive and evolve to meet people’s needs over time.

The buildings examined in this volume range from the twelfth to the twenty-first century and cross continents including case-studies from America, Australia and Europe, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Scandinavia and the Mediterranean. Themes include: Approaches to the study of buildings, Buildings of Power, Buildings in Identity, Domestic Space and Urban and Village Spaces. The essays consider building design, role, and how the buildings were altered as their function changed to coincide with the needs and aspirations of those who owned or used the buildings. This collection of papers emphasizes the need for further international multidisciplinary approaches including archaeology, architectural history and art history in order to understand how ideas, styles, approaches and designs spread over time and space. Together, these papers generate valuable new insights into the study of buildings in the historic period.

About the Editors
LIZ THOMAS is a historical-archaeologist and heritage and cultural researcher based at the School of Natural and Built Environment, The Queen’s University of Belfast. She recently completed her British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship, a multidisciplinary study that focused on the docklands of Belfast, Northern Ireland. She specialises in the study of institutions, in particular won policymaking, political environments and human agency. Thomas’ current research is based on Public Heritage.

JILL CAMPBELL is a skilled buildings archaeologist. She has conducted fieldwork in Northern Ireland, England and Scotland and has produced architectural histories for the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. Dr Campbell has several published papers, and has contributed a chapter on medieval manor houses to the Oxford Handbook of Later Medieval Archaeology.
Identified skeletal collections: the testing ground of anthropology? by Charlotte Yvette Henderson and Francisca Alves Cardoso. 428 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918057. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918064. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Human skeletons are widely studied in archaeological, anthropological and forensic settings to learn about the deceased. Methods used to identify individuals in forensic contexts and to determine age and sex in archaeological settings are normally tested on identified skeletal collections: collections of skeletons with known age-at-death, sex, often occupation and cause of death. These collections often represent individuals dying within the last century, but this is variable and often depends on the purpose for creating the collection. Many were developed in attempts to understand local population biology whereas those collected recently are for forensic purposes: to improve identification in legal contexts. Some of these collections were developed from body donation programmes, while others have come from cemeteries: cemeteries which were either no longer viable or needed clearing. All these factors impact on who curates these collections: archaeology or anthropology departments and museums. However, unlike many other skeletons curated in these locations, these are individuals with names. All this raises ethical questions about their creation, curation and their use for research.

This book focusses on identified skeletal collections in the UK, Portugal, South Africa, USA and Canada. The chapters discuss how and why collections were amassed including the local legislation governing them. Alongside this run the ethical issues associated with their collection, curation and access to them. The demographics of the collections: who is included and why, along with such biases and how they can impact on research are also discussed, as are limitations in the documentary data associated with these individuals. The importance of these collections is also focussed on: particularly their role in developing and testing methods for age determination in adults. This shows why these collections are so vital to improve methods and interpretations for archaeological and forensic research. The importance of communicating this to the wider public is also addressed.

About the Editors CHARLOTTE HENDERSON is a researcher in CIAS – Research Centre for Anthropology and Health based in the Department of Life Sciences, Coimbra (Portugal). She completed her PhD at the University of Durham in the Department of Archaeology. Her research focusses on methods for identifying activity in past populations. She has a long-standing interest in ethics which she studied as part of her undergraduate degree in Philosophy.

FRANCISCA ALVES CARDOSO is a research fellow at CRIA – Centre for Research in Anthropology (Portugal). In 2008 she was awarded a PhD in Biological Anthropology/Paleopathology by the University of Durham (UK). Her research focuses on the significance of socio-economic and cultural variables in the interpretation of human skeletons. In 2014 she was awarded a grant to develop the project - Portuguese Human Identified Skeletal Collections (HISC): Shaping their ethical and legal framework, which aims to build a bridge between science and society on the importance of HISC, whilst considering their scientific value, social and cultural, as well as ethical implications.
From the Archaeological Record to Virtual Reconstruction The Application of Information Technologies at an Iron Age Fortified Settlement (San Chuis Hillfort, Allande, Asturias, Spain) by Juana Molina Salido. x+190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (126 colour plates). 425 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918750. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918767. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From the Archaeological Record to Virtual Reconstruction describes the use of New Information Technologies (IT) for the analyses and interpretation of archaeological record of the San Chuis Hillfort (San Martín de Beduledo, Allande, Asturias, Spain). The data gathered during the eight excavation campaigns conducted by Francisco Jordá Cerdá in the sixties and eighties of the 20th century was mechanised and digitalised. Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) of the hillfort was performed, followed by a creation of spatial analysis through the establishment of relations between the elements of the archaeological record. At the end, having studied and investigated the site’s urban evolution throughout its occupation period (890 cal. BP – 530 cal. AD), a virtual reconstruction of the hillfort in its different settlement phases, presenting various evolution scenarios is presented.

In the process a work methodology and a set of computer applications adapted for each step of this research have been established, such as the system for the insertion of records in a database, for planimetry drawings, hillfort virtualisation, and others.

About the Author Juana Molina Salido obtained a PhD in prehistory and archaeology. She has a long experience as an archaeologist, specialising in the application of New Information Technologies in the development of archaeological work, both in the field and in the cabinet. In addition, she is a technical specialist in heritage virtualisation. She is currently collaborating on several research projects at the UNED, the Middle Palaeolithic site of Jarama VI and on the hillfort that is the subject of this book.
London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Hardback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German. 422 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918378. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918385. Book contents pageDownload

London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.

About the Authors
JOHN SCHOFIELD was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings.

LYN BLACKMORE is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. During this time she has established the Anglo-Saxon fabric type series for London, has contributed to the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery and has published widely on aspects of post- Roman pottery. Her special research interests are the development of London and the role of local, regional and imported pottery and finds in trade and exchange. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94.

JACQUI PEARCE is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. She joined the Museum of London’s Department of Urban Archaeology in 1977 and has played a major role in the development and publication of the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery. She has served as Joint Editor of Medieval Ceramics, as well as of Post-Medieval Archaeology and is currently Joint Editor of English Ceramic Circle Transactions. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology.

TONY DYSON was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of London from 1974 to 1998.

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Life on the Edge: The Neolithic and Bronze Age of Iain Crawford’s Udal, North Uist edited by Beverley Ballin Smith. Hardback; xxxii+270 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 408 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917708. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917715. Book contents pageDownload

The discovery of archaeological structures in North Uist in 1974 after storm damage led to the identification by Iain Crawford of a kerb cairn complex, with a cist and human remains. Six years later he went back, and over the next three years excavated another cist with human remains in its kerbed cairn, many bowl pits dug into the blown sand, and down to two late Neolithic structures and a ritual complex. He intensively studied the environmental conditions affecting the site and was among the first archaeologists in Scotland to understand the climate changes taking place at the transition between late Neolithic and the early Bronze Age. The deposition of blown sand and the start of the machair in the Western Isles, including the rise in sea-level and inundations into inhabited and farmed landscapes, are all part of the complex story of natural events and human activities.

Radiocarbon dating and modern scientific analyses provide the detail of the story of periods of starvation suffered by the people that were buried on the site, of the movement away of the community, of their attempts of bringing the ‘new’ land back into cultivation, of a temporary tent-like structure, and of marking their territory by the construction of enduring monuments to the dead.

About the Editor
BEVERLEY BALLIN SMITH took up the mantle left by Iain Crawford and has brought this first monograph on his Udal project area to publication. She has extensive experience of working on, and publishing, other large multi-period sites. She is an archaeologist who lived and worked on Orkney for many years and has first-hand experience of the archaeology of Shetland, the UK, Faroes, Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and is now based in Scotland. Beverley is the Publications Manager at GUARD Archaeology Ltd and editor of ARO (Archaeology Reports Online), with the aim of disseminating information to relevant audiences. She undertakes specialist analysis of prehistoric pottery and coarse stone tools. She has been a member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists for nearly all her professional life; she served on the former IfA Council, was Vice Chair for Outreach, a member of the Validation Committee and was a CIfA Board director. She is a member of the Society of Antiquaries of London and also a member of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, where she has been Vice President. She is currently President of Archaeology Scotland and a Research Associate at National Museums Scotland.
Maryport: A Roman Fort and Its Community by David J. Breeze. vi+116 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (63 plates in colour). 402 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918019. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918026. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £14.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The collection of Roman inscribed stones and sculpture, together with other Roman objects found at Maryport in Cumbria, is the oldest archaeological collection in Britain still in private hands. Today, it is housed in the Senhouse Roman Museum on Sea Brows to the north of the modern town of Maryport. Beside the museum the earthworks of the Roman fort may still be seen, and beyond it, though not visible, lies a large civil settlement revealed through geophysical survey and the scene of two recent excavations. Maryport: A Roman Fort and its community places the collection in context and describes the history of research at the site. Maryport, although at the north-western edge of the Roman Empire, provides material of international importance for our understanding of the Roman state.

About the Author
DAVID BREEZE has been a trustee of the Senhouse Museum Trust since its inception in 1985 and chair of the trust since 2013. He has served as President of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society and as Chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier. He was Chief Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Scotland from 1989 to 2005, and subsequently led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site in 2008. David has excavated on both Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall and written several books on these frontiers, on frontiers elsewhere in the Roman Empire and on the Roman army.
Axe-heads and Identity An investigation into the roles of imported axe-heads in identity formation in Neolithic Britain by Katharine Walker. xiv+318 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (86 colour plates). 386 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917449. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917456. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The significant body of stone and flint axe-heads imported into Britain from the Continent has been poorly understood, overlooked and undervalued in Neolithic studies, particularly over the past half century. It is proposed, in this study, that the cause is a bias of British Neolithic scholarship against the invasion hypothesis and diffusionist model, and it is sought therefore to re-assess the significance accorded to these objects. The aim is to redress the imbalance by re-focusing on the material, establishing a secure evidence base, and exploring the probable conditions in which these often distinctive items made their way to Britain. The narrative presented here rests upon the argument that imported axe-heads came into what is today called Britain as objects of considerable significance. Specifically, they were items of high symbolic value that played a crucial role in fostering particular ways of thinking about, and addressing, social identity in the Neolithic period. These issues are the context for the study, whose main objectives are the close and detailed cataloguing of relevant material, and a documentation of the investigative work needed to establish the credentials of each artefact.

About the Author
Katharine Walker is a prehistorian who specialises in the Neolithic of northwest Europe. She is Visiting Research Fellow at Bournemouth University, 'Ecademy' Project Officer at the New Forest Centre in Lyndhurst, and a freelance lithics and stone axe specialist. She studied at the Universities of Bristol, Cardiff, and Southampton where she completed a PhD in 2015. Her current research interests focus on materials and material culture, and she has also published on the first metalwork and the origins of social power in The Oxford Handbook of Neolithic Europe (2015). She is an active Committee Member of the Implement Petrology Group, as well as Editor of their newsletter Stonechat.
Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los siglos XVIII al XX edited by Sergio España-Chamorro, Rebeca Arranz Santos, Alberto Romero Molero. xii+246 pages; illustrated throughout in color and black & white (71 colour plates). 50 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918637. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918644. Book contents pageDownload

The History of archaeological research has only recently become a research topic of interest within Spain. A congress, Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX, was held at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2016 designed to bring this topic to the fore. Eleven papers are presented in this proceedings volume. They address several aspects from different perspectives that collectively enrich the historiography of Spanish archaeological research.

La Historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas es un campo de estudio muy reciente en el caso español. No obstante, las últimas décadas han sido muy fructíferas en esta línea de investigación. Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX es un volumen que recoge ese testigo con once trabajos originales que traen a la primera línea la historiografía de la Arqueología española. Estos trabajos, fruto de un congreso homónimo realizado en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid en 2016, abordan diferentes temas y perspectivas que abarcan importantes aspectos de la temática tratada con una variedad geográfica que atiende la diversidad y riqueza de la historiografía arqueológica española.

EDITORES
SERGIO ESPAÑA-CHAMORRO es doctor en Estudios del Mundo Antiguo por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Actualmente es investigador posdoctoral en la Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (CSIC) y profesor adjunto en la Universidad Isabel I. Sus líneas de investigación versan sobre Arqueología del Paisaje centrándose en la Bética y en Italia, además de su participación en proyectos de investigación sobre el espacio doméstico en Pompeya y la escultura romana en Cartago. Ha realizado estancias de investigación en el Departamento de Arqueología de la University of Southampton, en el centro CIL de la Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, en la Università degli Studi di Bari ‘Aldo Moro’ y en el Musei dei Fori Imperiali-Mercati di Traiano (Roma).

Rebeca Arranz Santos es graduada en Historia del Arte por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, y posee un máster en Arqueología del Mediterráneo en la Antigüedad clásica por la misma universidad. Compagina su doctorando en Historia y Arqueología con su colaboración como profesora en el Centro de Estudios Artísticos Elba, donde imparte cursos de Arqueología de Grecia, Arqueología de Roma y Arte de Mesopotamia y del Mediterráneo Oriental. Es miembro del grupo de trabajo del Proyecto I+D+I de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando. Además, ha realizado una estancia de doctorado en Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma.

Alberto Romero Molero es doctor en Prehistoria, Arqueología y Patrimonio por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Actualmente es director del Grado en Historia y Geografía de la Universidad Isabel I. Ha formado parte de numerosos proyectos de investigación, tanto nacionales como en el extranjero, lo que le ha permitido asistir y organizar numerosos seminarios, congresos, cursos y eventos de difusión científica. Sus líneas de investigación se centran en la arquitectura romana, el estudio de las técnicas constructivas, el análisis arqueológico de los espacios domésticos y la historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas. Ha desarrollado trabajos de campo, tanto de excavación como de documentación, en Carteia (San Roque, Cádiz), Baelo Claudia (Tarifa, Cádiz), Banasa (Marruecos), Veio y Pompeya (Italia).
Cuando (no siempre) hablan las piedras Hacia una arqueología integral en España como recurso de futuro. EL caso de Andalucia. 594 pages; Spanish text.. 22 2018. ISBN 9788416725113. £19.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Desiderio Vaquerizo Gil, Catedra?tico de Arqueologi?a en la Universidad de Co?rdoba, docente vocacional hasta los huesos, con una excelente formacio?n acade?mica, y empen?ado al ma?ximo con el objetivo de que la arqueologi?a sea realmente una ciencia social, reflexiona en este libro, de forma apasionada, lu?cida, cri?tica, valiente y comprometida sobre la arqueologi?a de los u?ltimos treinta y cinco an?os en Espan?a, con una consideracio?n especial sobre Andaluci?a y especi?ficamente Co?rdoba, pero sin perder nunca el referente ma?s amplio de la disciplina y utilizando el a?rea de estudio como atalaya para mirar mucho ma?s alla?. El tema, extenso y complejo, abarca muchos a?mbitos y exige perspectivas muy diferentes, que van desde una o?ptica profesional e investigadora a otra divulgativa y de percepcio?n social, pasando por una legislativa y au?n poli?tica (con mayu?scula), otra patrimonial y econo?mica, la internacional del mundo globalizado en que vivimos y hasta una perspectiva autocri?tica, que preside todo el discurso. Desde ahi? pretende buscar salidas de futuro para la situacio?n delicada en que se encuentra la arqueologi?a en nuestro pai?s, despue?s de la crisis econo?mica iniciada en 2008 —que desarbolo? al sector de empresas de arqueologi?a, dejo? tocada a la Universidad y congelo? expectativas en los museos—, y que sigue abierta todavi?a, con muchas incertidumbres en el horizonte. En el panorama de la arqueologi?a espan?ola esta reflexio?n es singular; no contamos con demasiadas voces claras y cri?ticas que quieran comprometerse por escrito para dejar testimonio pu?blico de la historia reciente y la situacio?n actual; desborda sinceridad y buenas intenciones a partes iguales, y proporciona valiosos materiales con lo que seguir levantando una arqueologi?a del siglo XXI, que sera? inevitablemente una «arqueologi?a en construccio?n».
The Gwithian Landscape: Molluscs and Archaeology on Cornish Sand Dunes by Thomas M. Walker with contributions from Rowena Y. Banerjea and C. Rob Batchelor. xiv+194 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (125 colour plates). 406 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918033. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918040. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Gwithian, on the north coast of Cornwall, is a multiperiod archaeological site. Excavations by Charles Thomas in the mid-twentieth century provided evidence of human activity from the Mesolithic to the post-medieval period. The present work explores the palaeoenvironment of the area around the settlement sites, from the Neolithic, when sand dunes initially developed in the Red River valley, to the present post-industrial landscape. Multiproxy analyses on sediments from coring, a test pit and mollusc columns provide a view of the changing landscape and how it may have influenced, or been influenced by, human presence and settlement. Mollusc studies are used as the principal analytical method. Multiple radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminesce dates permit these changes to be studied on a tighter time frame than was previously possible. Mining activity from the Bronze Age to the present is explored using fine-resolution geochemistry. Dating allows the timing of the extinction and introduction of some mollusc species to be refined.

About the Author
THOMAS WALKER is Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading. After a career in medicine he entered the world of archaeology in retirement, initially studying for a BSc at Reading and then progressing to a PhD. This monograph is based on his PhD thesis, which explored the palaeoenvironment of blown sands in Cornwall, principally at Gwithian. Table of Contents
Marcadores gráficos y territorios megalíticos en la Cuenca interior del Tajo: Toledo, Madrid y Guadalajara by Mª Ángeles Lancharro Gutiérrez. 346 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (222 plates in colour). 46 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917975. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917982. Book contents pageDownload

The aim of this work is to analyze Late Prehistoric graphical markers, comprising paintings, engravings, Megalithic elements, and other portable objects. All of them can be described as post-paleolithic or Schematic Art over various surfaces. The chosen area, the inland region of the Tajo inner basin (Spain), was especially appealing for several reasons, such as the lack of scholarship on the subject, the lack of information on the geographical location of the archaeological sites, and the extended ignorance about the sites’ materials and relationships.

The methodology is based on systematic registration of all archaeological sites. This is studied from an Archaeology Landscape perspective through Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis. It tests geographical markers according to their strategic location (pre-eminence and visibility) and their relationship with other funerary, habitable and resources sites. This has allowed parietal surfaces (megaliths, caves, shelters) and mobile pieces to be given coordinate position for the first time in the region, which has demonstrated abundant and complex prehistoric graphical markers. The results achieved allow the extrapolation of settlement models, explained in chapter VI. Generally, shelters divide the territory by geographical units where the settlers have access to a variety of economic resources and transit networks.

About the Author
Dr. María Ángeles Lancharro has a BA in History from the University of Alcalá (Spain) and received her PhD in Prehistory from the same university. Her research interests include landscape archaeology, megalithic territories and their symbolism, Prehistoric Rock Art in the Iberian Peninsula and Late Prehistory in the inner basin of the Tajo river. Additionally, she specialises in databases, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis. Her work is focused on territorial analysis from rock shelters, habitats, necropoli, areas of exploitation and resources. Dr. Lancharro has an extensive teaching experience and has participated in several excavations in Spain and southern France aimed at the compared study of Megalithic and Schematic Art. Her findings have been published in different peer-reviewed journals and books, and she has participated in a number of archaeological conferences.

Spanish description:
El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de los marcadores gráficos de la Prehistoria Reciente, entre los que se incluyen pinturas, grabados, elementos megalíticos y elementos mobiliares que responden a la descripción de Arte Esquemático o Postpaleolítico sobre diferentes soportes. Se eligió como zona de estudio la cuenca interior del Tajo a su paso por las provincias interiores (España), de especial interés por su carencia de valoraciones conjuntas y desde luego, por la escasa información acerca del posicionamiento geográfico de estos yacimientos y el desconocimiento bastante generalizado de sus contenidos y relaciones contextuales. El método de trabajo se ha fundamentado en la recogida sistemática de todos los yacimientos registrados. El estudio se ha llevado a cabo con nuevas tecnologías como los Sistemas de Información Geográfica (SIG), desde una perspectiva de la Arqueología del Paisaje. Se han efectuado diversos análisis establecidos sobre su posición estratégica (preeminencia y visibilidad) y su relación con otros yacimientos de carácter funerario, habitacional y recursos de explotación. Esto ha permitido que los soportes parietales (abrigos, cuevas y megalitos), así como piezas mobiliares, se hayan georreferenciado por primera vez en la región, dando muestras de la abundancia y complejidad de estas grafías prehistóricas.

Los resultados nos han permitido extrapolar modelos de implantación en el territorio, expuestos en el capítulo VI. En general, existe una tendencia a delimitar el territorio en unidades geográficas caracterizadas, en las que las sociedade
Sites of Prehistoric Life in Northern Ireland by Harry and June Welsh. iv+236 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (47 colour plates). 398 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917937. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917944. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Much has been written about the history of Northern Ireland, but less well-known is its wealth of prehistoric sites, from which most of our knowledge of the early inhabitants of this country has been obtained. Until recently, the greatest sources for this information were prehistoric burial sites, which have been visible in our landscape for thousands of years and have attracted the attention of inquisitive people throughout this time, often removing items, or adding others and in doing so, making it difficult for later generations to sift through the evidence. Fortunately, sketches, notes and artefacts have been gathered by Ordnance Survey surveyors, antiquarians and archaeological and historical societies and these continue to be interrogated by modern archaeologists in their search for understanding.

A further problem has been the dependence on information about prehistoric societies from their burial sites. Very few sites where these people lived and worked were visible above ground and as a consequence, little was known about them. However, during the last few decades, large-scale infrastructure projects and associated archaeological investigation has revealed a wealth of information. Much of the detail has still to be published and made available for research, but has already enriched understanding of our prehistoric past.

This monograph brings together information on all the currently known sites in Northern Ireland that are in some way associated with prehistoric life. It has been compiled from a number of sources and includes many that have only recently been discovered. A total of 1580 monuments are recorded in the inventory, ranging from burnt mounds to hillforts. In addition to providing an inventory of all known sites, along with a selection of photographs and plans, the work also includes an introduction to the prehistory of Northern Ireland, an explanation of terms and a full bibliography. It should be considered alongside an earlier work by the same authors on prehistoric burial sites in Northern Ireland (The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland, Archaeopress Archaeology 2014). The aim is to provide a foundation for more specific research projects, based on a standardised format for this largely untapped resource and stimulate a renewed interest in the prehistory of Northern Ireland. Hopefully, this can then be considered along with our knowledge of the historical period to provide a more complete overview of the story of human activity in what is now Northern Ireland.

About the Authors: Harry Welsh is an archaeologist and historian and currently works at the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork at Queen’s University, Belfast. He has participated in and directed many archaeological excavations from Mesolithic to early modern periods and has published many books, articles and reports on archaeological sites and associated matters, as well as documenting and publishing on the history of the fire service in Northern Ireland. He has also managed the fieldwork activities of the Ulster Archaeological Society for many years and is an enthusiastic supporter of community archaeology projects.

June Welsh is a retired primary school teacher and has been a member of the Ulster Archaeological Society for many years. She has participated in a wide range of archaeological excavations and surveys, publishing many archaeological survey reports on the society website. She also took part in a research project funded by the Royal Irish Academy into prehistoric burials in Ireland. It was this project that led to her collaboration in the 2014 publication The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland, also published by Archaeopress, and this stimulated her interest in the life of prehistoric people.
Between History and Archaeology: Papers in honour of Jacek Lech edited by Dagmara H. Werra and Marzena Woźny. x+516 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 393 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917722. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917739. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Between History and Archaeology: Papers in honour of Jacek Lech is a collection of forty-six papers in honour of Professor Jacek Lech, compiled in recognition of his research and academic career as well as his inquiry into the study of prehistoric flint mining, Neolithic flint tools (and beyond), and the history of archaeology.

The papers explore topics on archaeology and history, and are organised into three sections. The first contains texts on flint mining dealing with well-known mining sites as well as previously unpublished new material. The reader will find here a wide spectrum of approaches to flint mining, ways of identifying raw materials used by prehistoric communities, and an impressive overview of the history of research, methodology and approaches to flint mining in Europe, North America and Asia. The following group of papers deals with the use of flint by Neolithic and younger communities, including typological studies on trace evidence analyses as well as theoretical papers on prehistoric periods in Europe and the New World.

The final section consists of papers on the history of archaeology in the 19th and 20th centuries. Some deal with the beginnings of archaeology as a scholarly discipline, while others present significant research from different countries. Readers will also find papers on the development of archaeology in the second half of the 20th century, both in political and institutional contexts. The book ends with the memories, which bring the Jubilarian closer to the reader by viewing him through the eyes of his co-workers and friends.

About the Editors
Dr Dagmara H. Werra is an archaeologist and an ethnologist. She works at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences as an adjunct at the Autonomous Research Laboratory for Prehistoric Flint Mining. In her professional career Dr Werra deals with prehistoric flint mining, the use of flint in Metal Ages and in modern times (gunflints) and with the identification and use of siliceous rocks by prehistoric communities. She obtained a BA in ethnology as well as MA and PhD (2013) in archaeology at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun. She is a project manager on the characteristics of ‘chocolate’ flint, and is a participant of research on obsidian artefacts. Since 2017 Dr Werra is Editor-In-Chief of the Archaeologia Polonia journal. She participated and conducted archaeological research at numerous archaeological sites, including those associated with flint mining.

Dr Marzena Woźny is a historian and an archaeologist. Her research deals with the history of Central European archaeology, including studies on the relationships between scholars, the history of the institutions and the archaeological thought. Dr Woźny authored almost forty articles on these issues as well as two books – Between generations. An interview with Professor Jan Machnik concluded by Marzena Woźny and Włodzimierz Demetrykiewicz (1859–1937). A prehistorian from the turn of the eras. She graduated with a history and then studies in museology degrees at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow. In 2015 she obtained a PhD in archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. She was a trainee at the National Museum of Archaeology in Malta. She is currently working on a dissertation devoted to the history of archaeology in Lesser Poland in the 19th century. She is also interested in the history of gunflint mining. Marzena is head of the Archives at the Archaeological Museum in Krakow.

Shipwrecks and Provenance: in-situ timber sampling protocols with a focus on wrecks of the Iberian shipbuilding tradition by Sara A. Rich, Nigel Nayling, Garry Momber and Ana Crespo Solana. vi+66 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 colour plates). 42 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917173. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917180. Book contents pageDownload

Two of the questions most frequently asked by archaeologists of sites and the objects that populate them are ‘How old are you?’ and ‘Where are you from?’ These questions can often be answered through archaeometric dating and provenance analyses. As both archaeological sites and objects, shipwrecks pose a special problem in archaeometric dating and provenance because when they sailed, they often accumulated new construction material as timbers were repaired and replaced. Additionally, during periods of globalization, such as the so-called Age of Discovery, the provenance of construction materials may not reflect where the ship was built due to long-distance timber trade networks and the global nature of these ships’ sailing routes. Accepting these special challenges, nautical archaeologists must piece together the nuanced relationship between the ship, its timbers, and the shipwreck, and to do so, wood samples must be removed from the assemblage. Besides the provenance of the vessel’s wooden components, selective removal and analysis of timber samples can also provide researchers with unique insights relating to environmental history. For this period, wood samples could help produce information on the emergent global economy; networks of timber trade; forestry and carpentry practices; climate patterns and anomalies; forest reconstruction; repairs made to ships and when, why, and where those occurred; and much more.

This book is a set of protocols to establish the need for wood samples from shipwrecks and to guide archaeologists in the removal of samples for a suite of archaeometric techniques currently available to provenance the timbers used to construct wooden ships and boats. While these protocols will prove helpful to archaeologists working on shipwreck assemblages from any time period and in any place, this book uses Iberian ships of the 16th to 18th centuries as its case studies because their global mobility poses additional challenges to the problem at hand. At the same time, their prolificacy and ubiquity make the wreckage of these ships a uniquely global phenomenon.
Excavation of the Late Saxon and Medieval Churchyard of St Martin’s, Wallingford, Oxfordshire by Iain Soden. xii+86 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (22 colour plates). 392 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917661. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917678. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook excavations over 2003-4 at the former St Martin’s churchyard, Wallingford, Oxfordshire. St Martin’s, one of perhaps eight churches of late Saxon Wallingford, was located in a prominent position in the centre of the burh. No middle Saxon activity was found and the earliest remains consisted of a layer sealing the natural subsoil which contained a probable late Saxon lead cross. Earliest use of the churchyard has been dated to the late 10th to early 11th century by radiocarbon dating, and burials continued until the end of the 14th century, serving a dwindling parish population, before the cemetery rapidly fell out of use thereafter. No burials post-date 1412. Part of the cemetery has not been disturbed by the present development. The unexcavated areas and previous post-medieval and modern disturbances has meant the original size of the cemetery remains unknown.

A late Saxon mortar mixer found on the site has added to a growing number of this distinctive early constructional feature. While its presence indicates the vicinity of the late Saxon church, no foundations of St Martin’s church appear to have survived cellar digging and quarrying for gravel that occurred in the early 18th century.

Osteological analysis of 187 of the 211 excavated skeletons of the cemetery has depicted a lay population which was almost equally split between males and females, with only a slight bias towards males. Their distribution showed no observable cluster within the churchyard by age or gender. A high proportion of children is notable but newborns and very young children were comparatively rare. The significance of this is unclear since so many disarticulated remains were also present due to later disturbance. Both degenerative pathologies and inherited conditions affecting bone were noted, as were a high frequency of trauma, some of it violent. Generally the population could be shown to have led healthy early lives compared to other urban assemblages, although evidence of tuberculosis and iron deficiency suggest that living conditions and diet at the heart of medieval Wallingford were far from ideal.

Within the excavated area of the cemetery, a number of the burials demonstrated known pre-Conquest burial rites and there are some aspects which may be peculiar to the area, suggesting local variations to common rites. Eight pre-Conquest burials had their heads supported mostly by stones, but one had his head supported by two disarticulated skulls. One 30-40 year old male was buried wearing a pierce scallop-shell, presumably a pilgrim badge from Santiago de Compostella. Four burials were interred in stone-built cists and these ranged from a c1 year old to adults of both sexes. A further six burials lay in stone-built cists without a cover. All post-Conquest burials were earth-cut examples.
Durovigutum: Roman Godmanchester by H. J. M. Green. Compiled, collated and edited by Tim Malim. xxiv+460 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (67 colour plates). 389 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 33. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917500. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917517. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication presents the results of over 30 years of investigation into Roman Godmanchester, (Cambridgeshire), by Michael Green. The book accurately locates the 25 “sites” investigated, and pinpoints the trenches against the modern street layout. Although some sites covered large areas, many often had to be conducted as small trenches undertaken by volunteers. The origins for Durovigutum include evidence for Iron Age settlement which preceded two Roman forts during the 1st century AD. After its initial military establishment the book goes on to reveal the development of the Roman civic community and its cemeteries along Ermine Street adjacent to its crossing of the Great Ouse.

The town was surrounded by defences in the 2nd century and a wall in the 3rd century, its public buildings included a mansio, bath-house and brewery, aisled barns, basilica and several temples, and the socio-economic foundation of the community is explored with specific examples from excavated evidence including different types of domestic housing and workshops. A tavern, glassware-shop, dairy equipment, pottery manufacture and a smithy are detailed in this book, as well as analysis of land organization, infield and outfield agriculture, and a villa estate at Rectory farm. Specialist analyses include samian and coarse wares, vessel and window glass, coins, animal bone, dairy production, belief systems and burial practices, as well as the exceptional finds of a hoard of jewellery from one of the mansio pits, and a burial casket of wood and bronze.

Although partial or full reports of various excavations have been published in journals and monographs previously, this is the first time Green’s full body of work on Godmanchester has been collated and presented in one comprehensive volume. The book has not tried to include more recent investigations, and most illustrations are by Michael Green, drawn contemporary with his excavations.

About the Author
Michael Green was born in St Ives, Huntingdonshire, in 1931. His father was a dentist, a WW1 flying ace and a Colonel in the Northamptonshire Regiment, who died in action with the BEF at Ypres in 1940. Michael was brought up by his mother, going to King’s College Choir School, Felsted, before training as an architect and starting his excavations in Godmanchester in 1951. He joined the Ministry of Works in the early 1950s and was made a Senior Investigator of Historic Buildings at the Department of the Environment, before later becoming an Inspector of Ancient Monuments and Historic Buildings. He undertook rescue excavations at Whitehall Palace between 1960-62 for the Ministry of Works and London Museum, and helped in the redesign of the Jewel Tower on College Green opposite the Houses of Parliament. In 1990 he was a founding member and President of the Centre for Crop Circle Studies which sought a more systematic approach to understanding these phenomena, and he published many articles in the cerealogist. He was a frequent contributor to various magazines and journals, including the Illustrated London News, The Archaeological News Letter, and the Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, a society of which he was elected President for two successive terms 1980-85. He is a Chartered Member of the Royal Institute of British Architects and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. In 2008 he published a definitive history of Clapham, where he has lived for some 30 years.

About the Editor
Tim Malim graduated from the Institute of Archaeology, London in 1980 and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists, as well as Chair of the Federation of Archaeological Managers and Employers. He has conducted research in Chile, Peru, Sri Lanka and continental Europe, as well as the UK where his present role is Technical Director at SLR Consulting in Shrewsbury. In the 1980s and 1990s Tim w