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Egil’s Saga: Traditional evidence for Brúnanburh compared to Literary, Historic and Archaeological Analyses by John R. Kirby. Paperback; 203x276mm; 58 pages; 12 figures (9 in colour). (Print RRP £22.00). 74 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691092. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691108. Book contents pageDownload

Regarded as the secondary source advocated by some scholars for this battle around Brúnanburh in AD 937, Egil’s Saga Skalla-Grímssonar (collated c. AD 1242-3) becomes problematical when compared with literary, historic and archaeological evidence. Thus, this argument places the saga in a rather awkward position.

In addressing the general veracity of this saga, allegedly ‘written’ by Snorri Sturluson in 1240/1 we must draw a comparison to distinguish reality from fiction. For this article highlights not only the questionable traditions of Egil fighting at Brúnanburh but whether Snorri’s interpretation was motivated by self-interest. More importantly, could other people have gathered together Snorri’s notes and produced Egil’s Saga? Doubts arise as to its authenticity as many scholars have previously expressed the differing literary anomalies within the narrative. Was the saga written by more than one person? Was it embellished by Snorri or others? Where did the Brúnanburh traditions come from? Is it accurate enough to be used as a historic source – a factual reference? The author suggests this approach may identify the incongruities within this saga demonstrating a correct analysis.
Bronze Age Metalwork: Techniques and traditions in the Nordic Bronze Age 1500-1100 BC by Heide W. Nørgaard. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+502 pages; 290 figures (244 plates in colour). 474 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690194. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690200. Book contents pageDownload

Bronze ornaments of the Nordic Bronze Age (neck collars, belt plates, pins and tutuli) were elaborate objects that served as status symbols to communicate social hierarchy. The magnificent metalwork studied here dates from 1500-1100 BC. An interdisciplinary investigation of the artefacts was adopted to elucidate their manufacture and origin, resulting in new insights into metal craft in northern Europe during the Bronze Age. Based on the habitus concept, which situates the craftsmen within their social and technological framework, individual artefact characteristics and metalworking techniques can be used to identify different craft practices, even to identify individual craftsmen. The conclusions drawn from this offer new insights into the complex organisation of metalcraft in the production of prestige goods across different workshops. Several kinship-based workshops on Jutland, in the Lüneburg Heath and Mecklenburg, allow us to conclude that the bronze objects were a display of social status and hierarchy controlled by, and produced for, the elite – as is also seen in the workshops on Zealand. Within the two main metalworking regions, Zealand and central Lower Saxony, workshops can be defined as communities of practice that existed with an extended market and relations with the local elite. Attached craft, in the sense that the craftspeople fully depended on a governing institution and produced artefacts as a manifestation of political expression, was only detected on Zealand between 1500-1300 BC.

The investigation presented here showed that overall results could not be achieved when concentrating only on one aspect of metalwork. Highly skilled craft is to be found in every kind of workshop, as well as an intensive labour input. Only when considering skill in relation to labour input and also taking into account signs of apprenticeship and cross-craft techniques, as well as the different categories of mistakes in crafting, can a stable image of craft organisation be created.

About the Author
HEIDE W. NØRGAARD is a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, where she graduated and received her PhD in 2014. With the background as an educated goldsmith, she is working with metal artefacts trying to solve craft technical problems from the Bronze to the early Iron Ages in Northern Europe. Heide W. Nørgaard is currently working on reconstructing the earliest metal trading routes towards Scandinavia, based on over 500 lead isotope analysis of the first half of the 2nd millennium BC.
Giving the Past a Future: Essays in Archaeology and Rock Art Studies in Honour of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu edited by James Dodd and Ellen Meijer. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+300 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (96 plates in colour). 61 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919702. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919719. Book contents pageDownload

This volume celebrates the work of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu in his 40th year as director of Tanum Museum of Rock Carving and Rock Art Research Centre, Underslös, Sweden. Here, a feast of scholarly contributions from across Europe, at all levels of study have been collected. Each and every one of the chapters addresses aspects connected to the work Gerhard has done over the last 40 years. Through their words and images, these pay respect to and acknowledge Gerhard’s achievements in the fields of rock art documentation, research, international collaboration and outreach. Gerhard has striven from the outset to: promote the importance of the image within archaeology, increase public interest and involvement with prehistoric art, and to encourage the next generation to continue the work. Thus, many authors think very deeply about the images, how we interpret them and how we record them, particularly in light of recent advances in technology. Others explore how Gerhard has fostered dissemination and public involvement. The range of countries and subjects represented; France, Italy, Holland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and the UK; reflects the success of Gerhard’s focus on international collaboration and dialogue. Given Gerhard’s emphasis on giving the past a future, it is appropriate that leading up and coming scholars, from all levels of higher education, are also present and have the opportunity to present their latest research.

About the Editors
JAMES DODD is currently a PhD scholar at the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies, Aarhus University, Denmark. Originally educated at Durham University, James is a specialist in the study, analysis and documentation of the prehistoric rock art of Scandinavia. During the past few years, he has worked extensively in the field, becoming versed in the archaeology of the areas with various museums and institutions in the Scandinavian countries, in particular Bornholms Museum, Denmark. His current PhD project investigates the extent of homogeneity or diversity within Southern Tradition rock art. In addition to high-level statistical analyses and GIS, James is undertaking the largest programme of surface-based rock art documentation ever conducted in Denmark, on the island of Bornholm. Advances in technology are brought into the field with processing of image-based models occurring on site using remote access to cluster processing on the Danish e-Infrastructure Collaboration’s High Performance Computer: Abacus 2.0.

ELLEN MEIJER has been working with the documentation of rock carvings for the past 22 years. She has learned the ins and outs of documentation at Tanums Hällristningsmuseum Underslös. Since 2011, she has worked for projects on rock art documentation at the Swedish Rock Art Research Archives and the University of Gothenburg, as a research assistant, as well as a field supervisor teaching courses in rock art documentation organized by University of Gothenburg in collaboration with Swedish Rock Art Research Archives and The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art. She has been jointly responsible for the development and implementation of digital documentation of rock art through Structure from Motion and optical laser scanning within the Tanum World Heritage Area and published in Adoranten, the peer reviewed Rock Art Magazine of The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art.

Both James and Ellen are members of the Board of The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art.
Gifts, Goods and Money: Comparing currency and circulation systems in past societies edited by Dirk Brandherm, Elon Heymans and Daniela Hofmann. vi+228 pages; 73 figures (30 colour plates). 416 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918354. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918361. Book contents pageDownload

The papers gathered in this volume explore the economic and social roles of exchange systems in past societies from a variety of different perspectives. Based on a broad range of individual case studies, the authors tackle problems surrounding the identification of (pre-monetary) currencies in the archaeological record. These concern the part played by weight measurement systems in their development, the changing role of objects as they shift between different spheres of exchange, e.g. from gifts to commodities, as well as wider issues regarding the role of exchange networks as agents of social and economic change. Among the specific questions the papers address is what happens when new objects of value are introduced into a system, or when existing objects go out of use, as well as how exchange systems react to events such as crises or the emergence of new polities and social constellations. One theme that unites most of the papers is the tension between what is introduced from the outside and changes that are driven by social transformations within a given group.

About the Editors
DIRK BRANDHERM studied Archaeology, Classics and Social Anthropology at the universities of Münster, Edinburgh and Freiburg. Most of his work has been in European Bronze and Iron Age archaeology, with one focus on metalwork production and depositional practices. He currently holds a position of Lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

ELON HEYMANS studied archaeology at the University of Amsterdam and at Tel Aviv University. He completed his PhD in Tel Aviv on the early history of money in the eastern Mediterranean Iron Age, and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Utrecht University. His focus lies on the archaeology of Greece and the southern Levant, and he is particularly interested in the social, political and historical context of early money use.

DANIELA HOFMANN has obtained her PhD from Cardiff University and is currently Junior Professor at Hamburg University, Germany. She has published extensively on funerary archaeology, as well as the figurines and domestic architecture of the central European Neolithic, but she is also interested in instances of structured deposition and in spheres of exchange.
Foreigners and Outside Influences in Medieval Norway edited by Stian Suppersberger Hamre. ii+124 pages; illustrated throughout (14 plates in colour). 368 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917050. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917067. Book contents pageDownload

Foreigners and Outside Influences in Medieval Norway results from an international conference held in Bergen, Norway, in March 2016, entitled ‘Multidisciplinary approaches to improving our understanding of immigration and mobility in pre-modern Scandinavia (1000-1900)’. The articles in this volume discuss different aspects of immigration and foreign influences in medieval Norway, from the viewpoint of different academic disciplines. The book will give the reader an insight into how the population of medieval Norway interacted with the surrounding world, how and by whom it was influenced, and how the population was composed.

About the Editor
Dr Stian Suppersberger Hamre is a biological anthropologist with a BA in palaeoanthropology from the University of New England, Australia, and an MSc in forensic anthropology from Bournemouth University, England. His PhD research at the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bergen, Norway, has focussed on different aspects of the medieval population in Norway. From 2013, his main interest has been to improve our understanding of pre-modern immigration, mobility and population composition in Norway, with a special emphasis on bringing different disciplines together to illuminate these topics and to complement his own research as a biological anthropologist.
Ritual Landscapes and Borders within Rock Art Research Papers in Honour of Professor Kalle Sognnes edited by Heidrun Stebergløkken, Ragnhild Berge, Eva Lindgaard and Helle Vangen Stuedal. i-viii, 1-188 pages, illustrated in colour throughout. 190 2015. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784911584. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911591. Download

Ritual landscapes and borders are recurring themes running through Professor Kalle Sognnes' long research career. This anthology contains 13 articles written by colleagues from his broad network in appreciation of his many contributions to the field of rock art research. The contributions discuss many different kinds of borders: those between landscapes, cultures, traditions, settlements, power relations, symbolism, research traditions, theory and methods.

We are grateful to the Department of Historical studies, NTNU; the Faculty of Humanities; NTNU, The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters and The Norwegian Archaeological Society (Norsk arkeologisk selskap) for funding this volume that will add new knowledge to the field and will be of importance to researchers and students of rock art in Scandinavia and abroad.
The Archaeology of the North Sea Palaeolandscapes Chapter 9 from Mapping Doggerland: The Mesolithic Landscapes of the Southern North Sea by Simon Fitch, Vincent Gaffney and Kenneth Thomson. Download

From the introduction: The map data generated as part of this project represents one of the largest samples of a, potentially, well preserved early Holocene landscape surviving in Europe and it is essential that some consideration of the archaeological context of the mapped remains is presented here. The European cultural period associated with this landscape is the Mesolithic which lasts between c. 10,000 BP and c. 5,500 BP, dependent on geographic position. Tremendous environmental change forms the backdrop to cultural events throughout this period. Sea level rise, associated with climate change, resulted in the loss of more than 30,000 km2 of habitable landscape across the southern North Sea basin during the Mesolithic alone, and the inundation of this immense area has essentially left us with a ‘black hole’ in the archaeological record for northwestern Europe as a whole. This situation is made worse by the fact that finds from the region only rarely possess an accurate provenance or context (Koojimans 1971; Verhart 2004). View pdf to continue…

This paper is taken from Mapping Doggerland: The Mesolithic Landscapes of the Southern North Sea edited by Vincent Gaffney. Kenneth Thomson and Simon Finch, Archaeopress 2007. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
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