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Ancient Engineering: Selective Ceramic Processing in the Middle Balsas Region of Guerrero, Mexico by Jennifer Meanwell. xiv+352 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 36 2017 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 48. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916503. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916510. Book contents pageDownload

This volume has two main objectives: establishing a chronology of the Middle Balsas and detailing the region’s pottery production methods. The author posits that pottery intended for different functions was often deliberately made and/or decorated in ways that were chosen to make the vessels more appropriate for their intended functions. More specifically, this study determines whether any of the pottery production patterns identified in the region are linked to specific constraints imposed by the materials during the process of pottery manufacture. For example, it examines whether variables such as vessel shape and wall thickness correlate with the clay types and processing techniques determined during thin section analysis of the ancient sherds. Additionally, certain production behaviours are identified that are characteristic of the entire region and that can be used as markers of local tradition.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

North American Rock Art Research 2010-2014 by Reinaldo Morales Jr. Taken from Rock Art Studies: News of the World V edited by Paul Bahn, Natalie Franklin, Matthias Strecker and Ekaterina Devlet. Pages 225-243.Download

North American rock art research since 2010 includes many familiar approaches, some modified to meet contemporary needs, and a few innovations that are maturing into standard research tools. The living voices of descendant communities are more important than ever to many researchers, who acknowledge that our enterprise is essentially one of outsiders looking in. Still others choose to begin on the inside, with the shared structures of human cognition, and approach the visible results (the rock art) as the gestural evidence of lost communicative acts. We even see some studies trying to reinforce one approach with the other—hybrid solutions in an increasingly pluralist endeavour. The information we gather is coming more and more from once invisible views of rock art: GIS-enabled distribution models of select data over more detailed landscapes; portable spectroscopy, microscopy, two- and three-dimensional extreme-resolution imaging; and drone-assisted photography and video (shared with more curious eyes through the explosion of rock art on social media). The last five years of rock art research in North America reflect the contributions of established academics and their students (off the lapel pin and into the lecture notes, to modify an old phrase), and the contributions of volunteers and avocationalists whose tireless dedication and unbridled enthusiasm remain infectious.
North America Chapter 20 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Dan Hicks and Michael D. Petraglia. 409-454.Download

This chapter presents a characterization of the North American collections. It begins with a discussion of the c. 271 ‘archaeological’ objects from North America that were part of the PRM founding collection (20.2). It then discusses the collections from the Northeastern United States (20.3), the Southern United States (20.4), the Midwestern United States (20.5), and the Western United States (20.6), before considering the material from Canada (20.7) and Greenland (20.8). Brief conclusions are drawn in section 20.9. The archaeological collections from Hawai’i are not discussed here, but form part of the discussion of Polynesian material in Chapter 27. Similarly, the archaeological collections from Puerto Rico are discussed with the Caribbean material in Chapter 19. The PRM holds no ‘archaeological’ collections from the United States Virgin Islands. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
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