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Hatra: Il territorio e l’urbanistica Prefazione di Roberta Venco Ricciardi by Enrico Foietta. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+560 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (140 plates in colour). Italian text; Introduction and chapter summaries in English. 64 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690057. £88.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690064. Book contents pageDownload

The ancient city of Hatra is located 80 km southwest of the modern city of Mosul. The site reached its apogee during the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD, arriving at the striking dimensions of c. 300 hectares and into a new role as the capital of a significant buffer state between the Parthian and Roman empires.

This volume is devoted to the study of the landscape surrounding Hatra and of the development of this important city, drawing on published information gathered by Iraqi and foreign expeditions, as well as unpublished data garnered from over fifteen years of fieldwork at the site by the Italian Archaeological Expedition.

The study of the landscape comprehends the morphology, hydrology and geology of the region and offers new proposals regarding the exploitation of natural resources and the development of regional and local routes through the territory under Hatra’s political and military control during the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD.

The analysis of Hatra as an urban centre consists of a detailed study of the city’s hydrology, street network and urban areas, with the purpose of detecting the principles behind the planning and development of the city. The main elements of the urban space are treated in this book: the Temenos area and the Small Shrines, the Necropoles, the Fortifications, the Houses, and the Palaces. Due to the cross-referencing of archaeological, historical and epigraphic data, new ideas have been proposed regarding the chronological phases of urbanism at Hatra, from its foundation up to the destruction of the city by the Sasanian army in AD 241.

La città di Hatra si trova nella Jazira irachena a circa 80 km a sud-ovest di Mosul. Il centro raggiunse il suo apogeo durante il II-III sec. d.C., toccando l’impressionante estensione di quasi 300 ettari e divenendo la capitale di un influente stato cuscinetto, collocato tra l’impero partico e l’impero romano.

Questo volume è dedicato allo studio del territorio e dell’urbanistica di questo importante sito antico, impiegando contestualmente informazioni edite, raccolte dalle varie missioni irachene e straniere che si sono avvicendate sul terreno, e inedite, provenienti dal vasto Archivio della Missione Archeologica Italiana a Hatra in più di quindici anni di ricerche sul campo.

Lo studio del territorio definisce un quadro dettagliato della morfologia, idrologia e geologia della regione e dell’area prossima al centro, oltre a proporre alcune nuove ipotesi interpretative sullo sfruttamento delle risorse ambientali, sull’articolazione della rete viaria periurbana e regionale e sull’estensione del territorio sottoposto al controllo politico e militare della città durante il II e III sec. d.C.

L’analisi urbanistica comprende uno studio approfondito dell’idrologia cittadina, della rete stradale e delle aree urbane, allo scopo di individuarne le principali caratteristiche ed eventuali regole nella pianificazione e nello sviluppo della città. Nel libro sono inoltre analizzati i principali elementi che compongono il tessuto urbano: il Temenos e i templi minori, le necropoli, le difese cittadine, le case e i palazzi. Grazie all’utilizzo contestuale del dato archeologico, storico ed epigrafico, è stato inoltre possibile formulare nuove ipotesi sulle fasi urbanistiche e sulla cronologia di Hatra dalla fondazione alla sua distruzione, avvenuta per mano sasanide nel 241 d.C.

ENRICO FOIETTA è dottore di ricerca e borsista presso l’Università degli Studi di Torino. È membro di varie missioni archeologiche nel Vicino Oriente (Siria e Iran). Attualmente collabora attivamente con la Missione Archeologica Congiunta Italo-Iraniana in Khuzistan (ICAR - CRAST), con la Missione Archeologica Italiana a Hatra, con il Centro Ricerche Archeologiche e Scavi di Torino (CRAST) e la Missione Franco-Siriana a Europos-Dura (CNRs Paris).
Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011 Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 edited by Jeanine Abdul Massih and Shinichi Nishiyama in collaboration with Hanan Charaf and Ahmad Deb. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+452 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (124 colour plates). (Print RRP £65.00). 452 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919474. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919481. Book contents pageDownload

Syria has been a major crossroads of civilizations in the ancient Near East since the dawn of human kind. Until the current crisis began in 2011, Syria was one of the foremost pioneers in the investigation of past human knowledge, diversity, and identity. However, due to the ongoing war, archaeological excavations came to an abrupt halt. Since then, there have been countless alarming reports of damage or destruction inflicted on archaeological, historical, and museum sites.

The International Syrian Congress on Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (ISCACH), held December 3-5, 2015 in Beirut, Lebanon, was designed to bring together international scholars who have directed or participated in archaeological expeditions in Syria, and colleagues from Syria. By doing so, not only could the results of years of archaeological investigations and cultural heritage management in Syria be shared and discussed, but also a spirit of friendship and collaboration could be fostered and strengthened during this turbulent period.

The Congress focussed on the scientific aspects of each explored site and region allowing researchers to examine in detail each heritage site, its characteristics and identity. Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011: Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 consists of two parts. The first part presents the results of archaeological investigations conducted between 2000 and 2010. The second part comprises abstracts of papers and posters presented during the Congress. It is hoped that this book will represent an important contribution to the scientific dialogue between international and Syrian scholars, and will appeal to the general public interested in the culture and history of Syria.

About the Editors
JEANINE ABDUL MASSIH is professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Hellenistic and Roman settlements, town planning, and architecture. She co-directed the excavations of Cyrrhus (Aleppo, Syria) on behalf of the Lebanese University and the DGAMS and coordinated many field and research projects in Syria and Lebanon. Since 2014, she has been in charge of the excavations and management of the Quarries of Baalbek (Lebanon) and of a survey project on the Southern Beqaa (Lebanon).

SHINICHI NISHIYAMA is associate professor at Chubu University, Japan. He specializes in the Iron Age culture of the ancient Near East, especially in the northern Levant. He has participated in various archaeological projects in the Near East and Central Asia including Syria, Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. He was also involved in the UNESCO-led cultural heritage projects in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. He currently co-directs archaeological projects in Iraqi Kurdistan (Yasin Tepe) and in Lebanon (Southern Beqaa).

HANAN CHARAF is assistant professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Near Eastern history and archaeology during the Bronze and Iron Ages in the central Levant. Her research interests include Bronze Age ceramic production and distribution, Bronze Age Cypriot pottery imported to Lebanon, supra and intraregional trade (exchange commodities and routes) in the Levant during the Bronze Age, and cultural characteristics of the transitional period Late Bronze Age-Iron Age in the central Levant.

AHMAD DEB holds a PhD in archaeology and is currently Head of the Department of the Historical Buildings and Archaeological Documentation at the Directorate General of Antiquities of Syria. He directed the Syrian excavations of Tell Nahr El-Arab (Tell Al-Shamiyeh) between 2011 and 2018. He specializes in Bronze Age settlements and burials in the Near East. Today, he dedicates his time to saving and documenting Syrian endangered cultural heritage.
About Bakr Awa Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Peter A. Miglus. Pages 229-239.Download

The site of Bakr Awa (35°13’14”N, 45°56’26”E) situated on the outskirts of the city of Halabja is one of the biggest ancient settlements in the western foothills of the Zagros in Iraqi Kurdistan (AAI 1970, 335 no. 54; AASI 1975-76, map 77 no. 14). It consists of a c. 800 x 600 m large lower city (max. +579 m a.s.l.) and a steep citadel mound (max. +595 m a.s.l.) dominating the plain (approx. +565 m a.s.l.). The citadel is crowned by an earthen parapet wall while the mound is surrounded by a moat dug probably in the Islamic period (Fig.1).
Current Investigations into the Early Neolithic of the Zagros Foothills of Iraqi Kurdistan Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Roger Matthews, Wendy Matthews, Kamal Rasheed Raheem and Kamal Rauf Aziz. Pages 219-228.Download

One of the most significant transformations in history took place after the last Ice Age, from c. 12,000 BC (all dates calibrated BC), when human communities changed from being mobile hunter-foragers to more settled farmers and stock-keepers, with domesticated crops and animals. This Neolithic transformation was a fundamental development in the human condition across much of the world and led ultimately, through surplus accumulation and social differentiation, to the emergence of towns, cities, and empires, shaping the modern world. The full volume is available in paperback here.
In the Neo-Assyrian Border March of the Palace Herald: Geophysical Survey and Salvage Excavations at Gird-i Bazar and Qalat-i Dinka (Peshdar Plain Project 2015) Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Karen Radner, Andrei Ašandulesei, Jörg Fassbinder, Tina Greenfield, Jean-Jacques Herr, Janoscha Kreppner and Andrea Squitieri. Pages 353-367.Download

The Peshdar Plain is situated in the province of Sulaymaniyah, district of Raniyah (also known as Raparin district), in the Kurdish Autonomous Region of Iraq, directly at the border with Iran on the upper reaches of the Lower Zab. The regional centre is the town of Qaladze (Qalat Dizeh), in the northwest of the plain, whose impressive settlement mound (36° 11’ 7” N, 45° 6’ 53” E) demonstrates that the site has held this position since antiquity. The Peshdar Plain Project was inaugurated in 2015 with the goal of investigating the region in the Neo-Assyrian period and focuses on two sites: tiny Gird-i Bazar (36° 8’ 18” N, 45° 8’ 28” E; henceforth Bazar), a shallow mound (altitude: 539 m) of only 1.5 ha situated in the plain, and the more impressive Qalat-i Dinka (36° 8’ 12” N, 45° 7’ 57” E; henceforth Dinka), looming high over the Lower Zab on the imposing terminal outcrop of a crescent-shaped mountain range along the northern river bank. This first report will briefly detail the geophysical survey (section 1) and the excavations (section 2) conducted in 2015 before introducing the bioarchaeological sampling strategy (section 3) and presenting a first assessment of the sites and more generally of the significance of our work in the regional setting of the Peshdar Plain and within the Neo-Assyrian Empire and its client states (section 4). The full volume is available in paperback here.
Magnetic investigations in the Shahrizor Plain: Revealing the unseen in survey prospections Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Simone Mühl and Jörg Fassbinder. Pages 241-248.Download

Prospection by magnetometer in urban environments outside the limits of excavation offers the possibility to unveil the layout of entire settlements, including street networks and residential and other architectural features, without the use of a spade. Questions about city planning, the use of built and open space and the organization of religious and other architecture at sites can all be addressed (cf. Fassbinder 2002; Fassbinder et al. 2005; Benech 2007). Magnetic prospections of sites in the Shahrizor Plain, which have been conducted since October 2013, have the potential to provide insights into the diachronic use of rural space in the region. This paper will focus on the results of investigations which were carried out at Gird-i Shatwan (bečuk – ‘the small mound Shatwan’; SSP-51 & 52), a small Parthian site in the rural environment of Wadi Shamlu in the center of the Shahrizor Plain. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Satu Qala: an Assessment of the Stratigraphy of the Site Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Cinzia Pappi. Pages 297-307.Download

The view of historical developments within the area of Idu, identified with Sâtu Qalâ on the Lower Zāb in Iraqi Kurdistan (Van Soldt 2008), and its hinterland have so far been closely connected to available information on the imperial expansion of Assyria in the region. Through the support of the Directorate of Antiquities of the Kurdish Regional Government of Iraq, an international team consisting of the universities of Leiden (2010-12), Leipzig (2010-14), the Salahaddin University of Erbil (2010-12), and the University of Pennsylvania (2013) was able to conduct several seasons of fieldwork at Sâtu Qalâ. Data from this fieldwork can now provide a much wider historical sequence for the settlement. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Monumental Earthen Architecture in Early Societies: Technology and power display Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 2 / Session B3 edited by Annick Daneels. iv+64 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 213 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912833. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912840. Book contents pageDownload

The theme of the symposium is the archaeology of earthen architecture in pre- and protohistoric cultures, with an emphasis on constructive techniques and systems, and diachronic changes in those aspects. The main interest is in monumental architecture (not domestic), where it is better possible to appreciate the building strategies that show raw earth to be as noble a material as stone or wood, but with its very own characteristics which required the development of original solutions and construction techniques. The scope on monumental buildings also allows analyzing the political, social and economical factors that made such architecture a recognized expression of societal values and political power.
Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age by Stanislav Grigoriev. 831 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 6 2015 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912758. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912369. Book contents pageDownload

Copper is the first metal to play a large part in human history. This work is devoted to the history of metallurgical production in Northern Eurasia during the Bronze Age, based on experiments carried out by the author and analyses of ancient slag, ore and metal. It should be noted that archaeometallurgical studies include a huge range of works reflecting different fields of activity of ancient metallurgists. Often, all that unites these is the term ‘metallurgy’. This work considers the problems of proper metallurgy, i.e. extracting metal from ore. A number of accompanying operations are closely connected with it, such as charcoal-burning, ore dressing, furnace constructing, and preparation of crucibles. In some instances the author touches upon these operations; however the main topic of the work is the smelting process. The closing stage of the metallurgical production is metalworking including various casting and forging operations, and also auxiliary operations: making of crucibles, casting molds, stone tools for metal forging. These problems are, as a rule, out of frameworks of this research.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

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