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NEW: Worlds Apart Trading Together: The organisation of long-distance trade between Rome and India in Antiquity by Kasper Grønlund Evers. viii+214 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 plates in colour. 385 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 32. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917425. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917432. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Worlds Apart Trading Together sets out to replace the outdated notion of ‘Indo-Roman trade’ with a more informed perspective integrating the new findings of the last 30 years. In order to accomplish this, a perspective focusing on concrete demand from the ground up is adopted, also shedding light on the role of the market in long-distance exchange. Accordingly, the analysis conducted demonstrates that an economically highly substantial trade took place between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean in the 1st–6th cen. CE, altering patterns of consumption and modes of production in both India, South Arabia and the Roman Empire. Significantly, it can be documented that this trade was organised at the centres of demand and supply, in Rome and India, respectively, by comparable urban associations, the transport in-between being handled by equally well-organised private networks and diasporas of seagoing merchants. Consequently, this study concludes that the institution of the market in Antiquity was able to facilitate trade over very long distances, acting on a scale which had a characteristic impact on the economies of the societies involved, their economic structures converging by adapting to trade and the market.

About the Author
Kasper Grønlund Evers holds master’s degrees in History from Lancaster (UK) and Copenhagen, as well as a PhD from the latter. He has previously published a monograph on the Vindolanda Tablets and the ancient economy.
NEW: Immagini del tempo degli dei, immagini del tempo degli uomini Un’analisi delle iconografie dei mesi nei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e del loro contest storico-culturale by Ciro Parodo. viii+338 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English summary. 376 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 30. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917340. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917357. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A characteristic shared by the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars is that they represent the twelve months of the year, referable to an iconographic repertoire which is divided into three themes: the astrological-astronomical, the festive-ritual and the rural-seasonal. With regard to the first type, the months are depicted through images of the signs of the zodiac, often associated with images of the guardian deities of the months; the second category includes depictions of the months that refer to some important religious festivals; finally, the third theme includes images of the months that allude to the most important work activities performed in the countryside. The figurative calendars, which in most cases are made on mosaics, are characterized by a wide distribution in terms of time, concentrated between the 3rd and 6th century, and geography, with the areas of greatest attestation consisting of Italy, Africa Proconsularis, Greece and Arabia. With regard to the architectural context, the calendars from the West are prevalently documented in the domus, while those from the East are particularly attested in ecclesiastical buildings. The aim of research presented in this volume is the in-depth study of the connections between the meaning of the iconography of the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars and their historical and cultural context.

About the Author:
Ciro Parodo (1978) received a Degree and a Post-Graduate Degree in Archaeology at the University of Cagliari (Italy), and a PhD in Classical Archaeology at the Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen (Germany). He focuses his research on two principal domains: the study of Greek and Roman Iconography as a means of understanding the social and cultural issues of the Classical World, and the reception of Classical Antiquity in the Modern and Contemporary Age. Italian Description: La caratteristica comune dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini consiste nella rappresentazione dei dodici mesi dell’anno, riferibile a un repertorio iconografico articolato in tre temi: quelli di tipo astrologico-astronomico, festivo-rituale e rurale-stagionale. Per quanto riguarda la prima tipologia, i mesi sono raffigurati mediante le immagini dei segni zodiacali, spesso associate a quelle delle divinità tutelari mensili; la seconda categoria include quelle raffigurazioni dei mesi che si riferiscono ad alcune importanti festività religiose; la terza tematica, infine, comprende quelle immagini dei mesi che alludono alle più rilevanti attività lavorative svolte in ambito campestre. I calendari figurati, realizzati nella maggioranza dei casi su mosaico, si contraddistinguono per un’ampia distribuzione in senso temporale, con una concentrazione cronologica fra il III e il VI secolo d.C., e geografico, con le aree di maggior attestazione costituite dall’Italia, l’Africa Proconsularis, la Grecia e l’Arabia. In merito invece al contesto architettonico, i calendari di provenienza occidentale sono documentati in prevalenza presso le domus, mentre per quanto concerne quelli orientali, sono attestati in particolare negli edifici ecclesiastici. L’obiettivo della ricerca presentata in questo volume si focalizza sull’approfondimento delle connessioni esistenti tra il significato dell’iconografia dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e il loro contesto storico- culturale.

Ciro Parodo (1978) ha conseguito la Laurea e la Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l’Università di Cagliari (Italia) e il Dottorato di Ricerca in Archeologia Classica presso l’Eberhard- Karls-Universität di Tübingen (Germania). Focalizza la sua ricerca su due ambiti principali: lo studio dell’iconografia greca e romana come strumento per analizzare le problematiche socio- culturali del mondo classico e l’indagine delle dinamiche di ricezione dell’antichità classica nell’età moderna e contemporanea.
NEW: La ceca de Ilduro by Alejandro G. Sinner. 189 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English summary. 375 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 29. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917234. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917241. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The minting of coinage in a territory without previous monetary history or tradition reflects a series of political, social and cultural changes that took place in order to make it possible. Such changes can be traced in the archaeological record thanks to elements apparently as different as coins, ceramics, epigraphy, funerary rites or architecture; these changes thus emerge as some of the most significant points in the colonization process that took place throughout the second century B.C. and at the beginning of the next century in the valley of Cabrera de Mar (ancient Ilduro) and the Laietani territory.

This book is exclusively devoted to the mint of Ilduro, its main goal being to study not only the issues produced by the workshop in detail, but also the role that this coinage had in the monetarization of a changing society, that of the Laietani, which had never previously needed to use coinage. To do so, the author of this study endeavours to answer the following questions in as much depth as possible: Who minted the coins? Why? What for? How? Where? When? How many?

With the aim of answering the aforementioned questions, this volume has been organized into ten chapters divided in three broader sections dedicated to studying, specifically, each one of the aspects involved in the production of this mint. The chapters considering the location of the workshop and the legends used are fundamental to answer the questions of who minted the coins and where. On the other hand, aspects such as metrology, typology and the technique (metallographic analysis) used by the mint are essential to understand how the coins were minted, and also to put forward a hypothesis as regards the use given to the coin issues discussed in the present study. Finally, the chapters dedicated to the production, classification and chronology of the issues should answer such important questions as when and how much money was put into circulation.

This is a book that, in addition to increasing our knowledge of Iberian numismatics, brings us closer to the evolution and production of the coin issues minted in present-day northeastern Spain in general and to the Ilduro workshop in particular.

About the author:
Prof. Alejandro G. Sinner holds a B.A. degree in History, and M.A. degree in Archaeology and a Ph.D. in Society and Culture (2014) from the University of Barcelona. He is currently an Assistant Professor in Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria.

Prof. Sinner’s research focuses on the social and cultural history of Roman Spain and the western provinces. His main research lines include Iberian Numismatics and epigraphy, identity construction, cultural change, and pre-Roman languages in the Iberian Peninsula. Despite being at an early stage in his academic career, Prof. Sinner’s publication record includes two books and over a dozen articles in national and international journals. Since 2006 he has been involved in the excavations of the ancient site of Ilduro in Cabrera de Mar (Catalonia) where he is currently directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.


Spanish description: La acuñación de moneda en un territorio sin historia ni tradición monetaria previa supone que se ha producido una serie de cambios políticos, sociales y culturales para hacerla posible. Tales cambios pueden detectarse en el registro arqueológico gracias a elementos aparentemente tan distintos como dicha moneda, la cerámica, la epigrafía, los ritos funerarios o la arquitectura, y se perfilan como algunos de los puntos más relevantes para entender el proceso de colonización que tuvo lugar a lo largo del siglo II a. C. e inicios de la centuria siguiente en el valle de Cabrera de Mar, así como en el territorio layetano.

Este libro, dedicado exclusivamente a estudiar la ceca de Ilduro, tiene c
NEW: Parian Polyandreia: The Late Geometric Funerary Legacy of Cremated Soldiers’ Bones on Socio-Political Affairs and Military Organizational Preparedness in Ancient Greece by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. xii+400 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 colour plates). 375 2017. ISBN 9781784917197. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The anthropological study of two late 8th century BC monumental graves, designated as T144 and T105, at the ancient necropolis of Paroikia at Paros, initially intended to investigate inter-island features of the human condition, observable as ingrained traces in the human skeletal record, as it may have related to the Parian endeavors in the northern Aegean for the colonization of Thasos.

Through the ‘Paros Polyandreia Anthropological Project,’ it was possible to retrieve insights into aspects of the human environments and experiences that had transpired in a Parian context, elucidated by a considerable population sample of cremated male individuals, transcending to broader features that would have involved Thasos; discerning further facets of the human condition during the Late Geometric to the Early Archaic periods in the ancient Hellenic world.

This book integrates the basic anthropological data, evaluations and assessments derived from the study of the human skeletal record of Polyandreia T144, and T105. Bioarchaeological and forensic anthropological research results include the morphometric analyses of biological developmental growth and variability in relation to manifestations of acquired skeleto-anatomic changes, along with inquiries into the demographic dynamics, and the palaeopathologic profile of the individuals involved. Such intra-site data juxtaposed afforded the possibility to deliberate on issues of the preparedness, intended purpose, function, and symbolic meaning of the funerary activity areas and to reflect on the organizational abilities and capacities of the political and military affairs of the Parians.

Moreover, inter-site evaluations where relative with the burial grounds of Orthi Petra of Eleutherna-Crete, Plithos of Naxos, Athenian Demosion Sema, Pythagoreion of Samos, and Rhodes offer comparisons on taphonomy, on cremated materials’ metric analyses, and on aspects of the funerary customs and practices in the interring of cremated war dead.
FORTHCOMING: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 2 2017 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). 2 2017. ISBN SBN 2399-1844-2-2017. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

ISSN 2399-1844 (Print)
ISSN 2399-1852 (online)

Articles:
• Nadia Aleotti, Rhodian Amphoras from Butrint (Albania): Dating, Contexts and Trade
• Donald T. Ariel, Imported Hellenistic Stamped Amphora Handles and Fragments from the North Sinai Survey
• Ofra Guri-Rimon, Stone Ossuaries in the Hecht Museum Collection and the Issue of Ossuaries Use for Burial
• Gabriel Mazor & Walid Atrash, Nysa-Scythopolis: The Hellenistic Polis
• Hélène Machline & Yuval Gadot, Wading Through Jerusalem’s Garbage: Chronology, Function, and Formation Process of the Pottery Assemblages of the City’s Early Roman Landfill
• Kyriakos Savvopoulos, Two Hadra Hydriae in the Colection of the Patriarchal Sacristy in Alexandria
• Wolf Rudolph & Michalis Fotiadis, Neapolis Scythica – Simferopol – Test Excavations 1993

Archaeological News and Projects:
• »Dig for a Day« with the Archaeological Seminars Institute

Reviews:
• John Lund, A Study of the Circulation of Ceramics in Cyprus from the 3rd Century BC to the 3rd Century AD (by Brandon R. Olson)
• Gloria London, Ancient Cookware from the Levant. An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective (by John Tidmarsh)
• Michela Spataro & Alexandra Villing (eds.), Ceramics, Cuisine and Culture: The Archaeology and Sience of Kitchen Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom)
• James C. R. Gill, Dakhleh Oasis and the Western Desert of Egypt under the Ptolemies (by Andrea M. Berlin)
• Anna Gamberini, Ceramiche fini ellenistiche da Phoinike. Forme, produzioni, commerce (by Carlo De Mitri)
• Maja Mise, Gnathia and Related Hellenistic Ware on the East Adriatic Coast (by Patricia Kögler)
• Jens-Arne Dickmann & Alexander Heinemann (eds.), Vom Trinken und Bechern. Das antike Gelage im Umbruch (by Stella Drougou)

2017 PRINT SUBSCRIPTION RATES (1 issue in 2017):

Institutions:
£50.00 (plus standard shipping rates)
Agents will receive 25% discount on institutional print price including shipping rates as stated

Individuals:
£30.00 (plus standard shipping rates)
NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually in October/November edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). vi+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in printed and e-versions. 1 2016 Journal of Greek Archaeology . ISBN 2059-4674-2-2017. Book contents pageBuy Now

An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora. the Editorial Board is headed by Professor John Bintliff (Edinburgh University, U.K. and Leiden University, The Netherlands).

For a full mission statement and information on the editorial and advisory board please visit the JGA page of our website.

Subscriptions are now open for JGA Vol 2 via our website. Please find links for private and institutional subscriptions below. Print and digital copies are expected to become available in October 2017. Please send all subscription-based queries to info@archaeopress.com.

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BACK-ISSUES

Volume 1 2016: Purchase back issues of JGA Volume 1 2016 by following the links below:

For private subscriptions for personal use please click here.

For institutional subscriptions please click here.

A free 70+ page sampler is available to download in our Open Access section designed to act as an introduction and taster to the scope and style of this new journal. It includes one complete paper and two review articles as well as full contents listings for Volume 1.

FORTHCOMING: Considering Creativity: Creativity, Knowledge and Practice in Bronze Age Europe edited by Joanna Sofaer. x+164 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (33 colour plates). 387 2017. ISBN 9781784917548. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Creativity is embedded in human history. Indeed, it is impossible to understand material change and the development of the new without invoking creativity. The location, exploration and analysis of creativity should therefore be of particular concern to archaeologists. This volume engages with this challenge by focusing on the outcomes of creativity – material culture – and an exploration of creative practice. The European Bronze Age provides a useful focus for discussions of the outcomes of creativity because in this period we see the development of new and pre-existing materials that we take for granted today, in particular textiles and bronze. We also see new ways of working with existing materials, such as clay, to create novel forms. In both new and existing materials it is frequently possible to see the growth of technical skill, to produce complex forms and elaborate decorated surfaces.

The papers in this volume view Bronze Age objects through the lens of creativity in order to offer fresh insights into the interaction between people and the world, as well as the individual and cultural processes that lie behind creative expression. Many have their origin in the international conference Creativity: An Exploration Through the Bronze Age and Contemporary Responses to the Bronze Age held at Magdalene College, University of Cambridge in 2103 as part of the HERA-funded project Creativity and Craft Production in Middle and Late Bronze Age Europe. Contributions span the early to late Bronze Age, deal with a range of materials including textiles, metal, and ceramics, and reflect on data from across the continent including Iberia, Scandinavia, Central and Eastern Europe. This breadth illustrates the wideranging importance and applicability of creativity as an heuristic concept. The volume further develops a range of theoretical and methodological directions, opening up new avenues for the study of creativity in the past.
FORTHCOMING: The Lamps of Late Antiquity from Rhodes 3rd–7th centuries AD by Angeliki Katsioti. ii+676 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 384 2017. ISBN 9781784917463. £65.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The city of Rhodes was an important harbour in the Hellenistic period, and although its political role in the Roman period was significantly diminished, it never ceased to be a key hub for trade. The catastrophic earthquake of 515 AD marked the transition from the Late Roman to the Early Byzantine period in Rhodes. The glorious ancient city shrunk in size; its streets, which had been laid out according to the Hippodamian grid, were encroached upon and large basilicas were founded on the sites of ancient sanctuaries. A significant portion of the city has been uncovered over the past few years by rescue excavation, revealing houses, mansions, streets and extensive cemeteries, all yielding a large quantity of finds. This study focuses on the recording, study and publication of the corpus of the Late Antique lamps dating from the 3rd to the 7th centuries as found in these rescue excavations in the town of Rhodes. The lamps of this period from Rhodes and the other Dodecanesian islands are nearly unknown in the bibliography. The aim here is to present the diachronic changes in the artistic sensibility and preferences of this particular market. An integral component in this process are topographical observations regarding the Early Byzantine town of Rhodes, giving some details about the extent of the building remains. In addition, facets of the economic and commercial activities of the island during Late Antiquity are highlighted. Subjects such as the transformation/adaptation of the ancient city to new circumstances are also debated. For some lamps, analyses of the clay have been undertaken and the results are presented.

About the Author
Dr Angeliki Katsioti works for the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports at the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese, as a Head of the Department of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Sites, Monuments, Research and Museums. Her main research interests are Late Roman archaeology, as well as Byzantine art and iconography.
NEW: Current Approaches to Collective Burials in the Late European Prehistory Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 14/Session A25b edited by Tiago Tomé, Marta Díaz-Zorita Bonilla, Ana Maria Silva, Claudia Cunha and Rui Boaventura. xii+128 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 374 2017. ISBN 9781784917210. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The present volume originated in session A25b (‘Current Approaches to Collective Burials in the Late European Prehistory’) of the XVII World Congress of the International Union of the Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP), held in Burgos in September 2014.

Collective burials are quite a common feature in Prehistoric Europe, with the gathering of multiple individuals in a shared burial place occurring in different types of burial structures (natural caves, megalithic structures, artificial caves, corbelled-roof tombs, pits, etc.). Such features are generally associated with communities along the agropastoralist transition and fully agricultural societies of the Neolithic and Chalcolithic.

For a long time, human skeletal remains exhumed from collective burials were dismissed as valuable sources of information, their studies being limited mostly to morphological assessments and subsequent classification in predefined ‘races’. They currently represent a starting point for diversified, often interdisciplinary, research projects, allowing for a more accurate reconstruction of funerary practices, as well as of palaeobiological and environmental aspects, which are fundamental for the understanding of populations in the Late Prehistory of Europe and of the processes leading to the emergence of agricultural societies in this part of the world.

The articles in this volume provide examples of different approaches currently being developed on Prehistoric collective burials of southern Europe, mostly focusing on case studies, but also including contributions of a more methodological scope.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
NEW: Autour de l’infanterie d’élite macédonienne à l’époque du royaume antigonide Cinq études militaires entre histoire, philologie et archéologie by Pierre O. Juhel. x+278 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. 373 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917326. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917333. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents five articles relating to military studies in the context of Macedonia of the Antigonids. Combining literary studies and archaeological research, the author proposes several new concepts on Hellenistic Macedonian military studies. Originally conceived as separate journal articles supporting a more general publication on the Macedonian army of Alexander the Great, it became clear it would be more useful and valuable to publish the articles together in one volume as they closely reference each other. Articles consider the Macedonian phalanx, Antigonid elite infantry, heavy infantry and defensive weaponry under the following headings: I. La nature de la phalange macédonienne ou quand la science recule; II. Antigonid Redcoats. L’infanterie d’élite de l’armée du royaume de Macédoine à l’époque hellénistique. Histoire et iconographie; III. ‘Infanterie lourde’ : une notion entre armement et ordonnance tactique; IV. Remarques philologiques et historiques sur l’ambivalence de termes relatifs aux institutions militaires macédoniennes chez les historiens de l’Antiquité; V. Deux nouvelles armes défensives de l’époque hellénistique.

French Description:
Ces cinq études militaires résultent essentiellement de développements présentés dans le manuscrit doctoral de l’auteur, L’Armée du royaume de Macédoine à l’époque hellénistique (323-148 av. J.-C.). Les troupes « nationales », présenté en Sorbonne le 11 janvier 2007. L’idée première avait été de les publier sous forme d’articles. Mais ce projet se heurtait à une difficulté. Ces textes se faisant écho, il s’avèrerait difficile d’attendre la diffusion du premier d’entre eux pour présenter les suivants tout en faisant exactement référence à un voire à plusieurs textes en cours de publication. Aussi apparut-il qu’il valait mieux les réunir en un recueil dont la cohérence serait assurée par un thème commun : l’histoire et l’archéologie militaire de l’époque hellenistique, tout particulièrement dans le cadre de la Macédoine des Antigonides.

Pierre Olivier Juhel est docteur en histoire et civilisation de l’Antiquité de l’Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV). Il est également titulaire d’une maîtrise de philosophie de l’Université Paris I (Panthéon–Sorbonne). Auteur de profession, il est spécialiste de l’histoire militaire de la fin de l’époque napoléonienne. En parallèle, dans la foulée de son doctorat consacré à l’armée macédonienne après Alexandre le Grand, il poursuit ses travaux académiques sur la Macédoine antique.
NEW: Elements of Continuity: Stone Cult in the Maltese Islands by George Azzopardi. x+94 pages; 41 figs. In black & white. 370 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916954. £18.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916961. £9.60 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stones can serve an infinite array of functions both when they are worked and when they are left in a ‘raw’ state. Depending on their function, stones can also be meaningful objects especially when they act as vehicles of ideas or instruments of representation. And it is, therefore, in their functional context, that the meaning of stones can be best grasped.

The stones dealt with in this study are non-figural (or aniconic) or, sometimes, semi-figural. They come from ritual contexts and, as such, act as a material representation of divine presence in their role as betyls. But it is not mainly the representational aspect of these stones that this study seeks to highlight. As material representations of divine presence that are also worshipped, these particular stones form part of a phenomenon that seems to know no geographical or temporal boundaries. They are of a universal character.

It is this universal character of theirs that seems to qualify these stones as elements forming part of the phenomenon of continuity: continuity across different cultures and in different places along several centuries. It is this phenomenon which this study seeks to highlight through a study of these stones. The Maltese islands are presented as a case study to demonstrate the phenomenon of continuity through a study of these stones. Worship of stones in representation of divine presence is found on the Maltese islands since prehistoric times. But the practice survived several centuries under different cultures represented by unknown communities during the islands’ prehistory and the Phoenicians / Carthaginians and the Romans in early historic times.
NEW: Die Ausrüstung der römischen Armee auf der Siegessäule des Marcus Aurelius in Rom Ein Vergleich zwischen der skulpturalen Darstellung und den archäologischen Bodenfunden by Boris Alexander Nikolaus Burandt. iv+412 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. German text. 369 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 28. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916930. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916947. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The reliefs of the column of Marcus Aurelius in Rome are used extensively for the illustration of Roman soldiers. However, despite the fact that in the last decades a number of sites at the Danube Limes have been analyzed, where numerous militaria from the Markomannic Wars have emerged, there is no comparison between this work of official Roman art and the archaeological finds. This book aims to address this lacuna. Each piece of equipment of the Roman soldier is analyzed in its sculptural representation and compared with the existing finds as well as supplementary comparisons with secondary sources. The result is a broad picture of the Roman army under Marcus Aurelius and of Rome's depiction of their forces in state propaganda. In addition, the present work comprehensively separates the antique parts of the frieze from the additions made during the late Renaissance for the first time and thus provides a solid basis for future archaeological and art historical evaluations.

About the Author
Boris A. N. Burandt studied Archeology of the Roman Provinces, Classical Archeology, History of Art and Ancient History at the University of Cologne, and specialized early in Roman military equipment. After completing his studies he was research assistant at the Morphomata International Center for Advanced Studies and in three projects of the German Archaeological Institute as well as a trainee of the State Office for National Heritage Conservation in the Rhineland. He also participated in various excavations and campaigns in Germany, Italy and North Africa. Since 2017 he has undertaken research at the Goethe-University in Frankfurt on the Main about Roman memorabilia in the context of gladiator fights and chariot races. This book is based on his PhD thesis, which was written between 2012 and 2015 at the University of Cologne.

German Description:
Die Reliefs der Marcussäule in Rom bilden seit Langem vielfach verwendete Vorlagen zur Illustration römischer Soldaten. Doch obwohl in den letzten Dekaden mehrere Fundplätze am Donaulimes aufgearbeitet wurden, an denen zahlreiche Militaria aus den Markomannenkriegen zutage gekommen sind, fehlt bislang ein Vergleich zwischen den Arbeiten der offiziellen römischen Staatskunst und den archäologischen Bodenfunden. Diesen Mangel soll nun das vorliegende Werk beheben. Jeder Ausrüstungsgegenstand des römischen Soldaten wird in seiner skulpturalen Darstellung analysiert und mit den vorliegenden Funden sowie ergänzenden Sekundärquellen verglichen. Es entsteht somit ein umfangreiches Bild der römischen Armee unter Marcus Aurelius und von Roms Umgang mit dem Militär in der staatlichen Propaganda. Außerdem separiert das vorliegende Werk erstmals umfassend die antiken Partien des Friesbandes von den Ergänzungen der Spätrenaissance und legt somit eine solide Basis für künftige archäologische und kunsthistorische Auswertungen.

Boris A. N. Burandt studierte Archäologie der römischen Provinzen, Klassische Archäologie, Kunstgeschichte und Alte Geschichte an der Universität zu Köln und spezialisierte sich früh auf die Erforschung römischer Militärausrüstung. Nach seinem Studium war B. Burandt Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Internationalen Kolleg Morphomata und in drei Projekten des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts sowie Volontär des Rheinischen Amtes für Bodendenkmalpflege. Außerdem nahm er an diversen Ausgrabungen und Kampagnen in Deutschland, Italien und Nordafrika teil. Seit 2017 forscht B. Burandt an der Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt am Main zu römischen Memorabilien im Kontext von Gladiatorenkämpfen und Wagenrennen. Das vorliegende Buch basiert auf seiner Dissertation, die zwischen 2012 und 2015 an der Universität zu Köln entstanden ist.
NEW: Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla by Mario Ramírez Galán. 434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (145 colour plates). Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access. 39 2017. ISBN 9781784917098. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla is a project that aims to encompass all aspects of battlefield archaeology, in order to be a reference work in this study area. Therefore, a detailed historiographical study about this branch of archaeology has been made, from early origins until the present day, allowing us to gain a deeper understanding of the evolution of battlefield archaeology. Two methodologies, archaeological and museographical, are proposed for the treatment of this particular type of archaeological site. In order to prove the viability of both methodologies, a theoretical application has been carried out in two research examples from different periods, demonstrating both the project’s methodological validity and reinforcing our theories.

Two registers were made regarding battlefields ¬- one historical and another archaeological. The purpose of this was to catalogue all possible existing sites in the interior of the Iberian Peninsula from Roman times through to the Spanish Civil War, which will hopefully serve as a point of reference for future researchers. Through this book, people will be able to understand the great potential of Spanish battlefields and their heritage. Furthermore, Spain could be regarded as a very important country regarding battlefield archaeology.

Spanish Description:
Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla es un trabajo que recoge todos los aspectos referentes a la arqueología de campos de batalla, con el objetivo de ser una obra de referencia en esta área de estudio. En ella se ha llevado a cabo un estudio historiográfico pormenorizado de esta rama de la arqueología, remontándose hasta los orígenes de la misma, permitiendo comprender su evolución hasta nuestros días. Se han planteado dos propuestas metodológicas, arqueológica y museográfica, para el tratamiento de esta tipología de yacimiento. Para comprobar la viabilidad de ambas metodologías se realizó una aplicación teórica en dos casos de estudio de distinta época, lo que nos permitió ver su validez y reforzar nuestras teorías.

Para esta obra elaboramos dos registros de campos de batalla, uno de tipo histórico y otro de tipo arqueológico, con el objetivo de catalogar todos los posibles yacimientos existentes en interior peninsular desde la época romana hasta la Guerra Civil, sirviendo así de punto de partida para futuros investigadores. A través de este libro se puede comprobar el gran potencial que posee España en campos de batalla y que podría situarse entre los países más destacados.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
NEW: Imágenes de centauros en los vasos áticos de figuras negras y de figuras rojas Siglos VIII A.C. – IV A.C. by María Herranz. 298 pages; 15 graphs, 124 tables (all in colour). Spanish text with English summary. Available both in print and Open Access. 38 2017. ISBN 9781784916831. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The centaur, a hybrid being with the body of horse and a human head and torso, first appeared in the mountains of Thessaly. This was the Greek horse-breeding region and it seemed natural for the centaur to have originated there, in the heart of this exclusive heritage of the landed gentry. Centaurs belonged to the spheres of heroic mythology, with clear ties to the values of the aristocracy.

This book is composed of a catalogue divided into nine chapters. Each chapter comprises catalogue entries for a number of black-figure and red-figure Attic vases. The division into chapters is based on the various types of centaurs and different conflicts, either among themselves or against a hero. In addition to the catalogue is a chapter on images and statistics. Each of these nine chapters corresponds to a section of catalogue entries and statistics, as the information refers to two examples in each section, one in black figures and another in red figures. The highlighted examples illustrate the variety of different vase types (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC). The statistics are likewise divided into black and red figures, and various themes, such as the centaur Pholos and the banquet, or Herakles and Nessos. For each of these themes or groups of examples, a table is given showing the number of vases (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their place in the chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC, etc.).

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Bridging Times and Spaces: Papers in Ancient Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian Studies Honouring Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan and Yervand H. Grekyan. xx+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 371 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916992. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917005. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bridging Times and Spaces is composed of papers written by colleagues of Professor Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion his 65th birthday reflecting the breadth and diversity of his scholarly contributions. The range of presented papers covers topics in Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian archaeology, theory of interpretation in archaeology and art history, interdisciplinary history, historical linguistics, art history, and comparative mythology. The volume opens with an extensive interview given by Gregory Areshian, in which Gregory outlines the pathways of his academic career, archaeological discoveries, different intellectual quests, and the organic connections between research questions that he explored across different social sciences and the humanities, stressing the importance of periodizations in interdisciplinary history as well as his views on holism and interdisciplinary studies.

About the Editors Pavel Avetisyan is a former student of Gregory Areshian during his study at the Yerevan State University in 1975-1980; he now leads together with Gregory and Kristine Martirosyan-Olshansky the joint Armenian-American archaeological team at the excavations of the Neolithic settlement at Masis Blur, Armenia. Pavel received his PhD in 2003 (Chronology and Periodization of the Middle Bronze Age of Armenia) and D.Sc. in 2014 (Armenian Highland during the 24-9th centuries BC. The Dynamics of Socio-Cultural Transformations, according to Archaeological Data). His areas of research are Old World archaeology and the Neolithic and Iron Age cultures of Transcaucasia, devoting his studies also to the periodizations and chronology of the Bronze and Iron Ages of Transcaucasia. Professor Avetisyan is the Director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Professor at the Yerevan State University.

Yervand Grekyan is a leading researcher at the Institute of Oriental Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Associate Professor at the Armenian State Pedagogical University. He received his PhD in 2002 (History of the Mannean Kingdom) and defended his habilitation thesis on the structure of the Urartian Kingdom at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia in 2016 (Biainili-Urartu. State and Society). Dr Grekyan’s interests are ancient history and culture of the Near East and especially of the Armenian Highland in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages.
The Mycenaean Cemetery at Agios Vasileios, Chalandritsa, in Achaea by Konstantina Aktypi with contributions by Olivia A. Jones and Vivian Staikou. xii+296 pages; 287 figures, 8 tables, 3 maps (163 plates in colour). 367 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916978. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916985. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean chamber-tomb cemetery at Agios Vasileios, near Chalandritsa in Achaea, was first investigated by Nikolaos Kyparissis in the late 1920s, followed by small-scale research in 1961 by Efthimios Mastrokostas. In the years 1989–2001 more rescue excavations were conducted by the Greek Archaeological Service, revealing 30 chamber tombs, some looted. Based mostly on the latest research, this study is the first major presentation of the cemetery and its finds. The topographical data are presented in chapter A, including the most important ancient sites in the region. Chapters B to E deal with the 45 chamber tombs and with the assemblage of the 260 artefacts found in them. The chipped stone assemblage and the ground stone implements are presented in chapter F by Vivian Staikou. Chapter G, by Olivia A. Jones, deals with the human skeletal remains, focussing on burial customs and practices. Chapters H and I handle the discussion and the concluding remarks, respectively. A series of 3D representations and photorealistic illustrations are presented, based on the original plans and architectural drawings of the tombs, to produce a visual appreciation of the important cemetery, unfortunately no longer visible.

About the Author
Konstantina Aktypi obtained her BA in Archaeology at the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and Certificates in Heritage Management, Administration, and Developing Communication Skills and Responses to Crisis. She has participated in projects of intensive archaeological survey and systematic excavations in Achaea and Aitoloakarnania. Since 1995, she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities of Achaea, conducting rescue excavations in the region dating from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman period. From 2002 to 2011 she worked at the excavations of the Mycenaean settlement and chamber tomb cemetery at Voudeni, also holding a supervisorial position for the major restoration works there. Her current research interests include the study of the chamber tombs at Voudeni, an Early Bronze Age settlement near Patras and the two best preserved tholos tombs in Achaea, in the prehistoric cemetery at Rhodia. She is also working on educational programs, introducing students to the art of Archaeology.

Olivia A. Jones obtained a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and History at West Virginia University and a Masters in Aegean Archaeology at University College London. She has worked in academic and contract archaeology projects in the United States and Greece. She is currently completing her doctoral research at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. Her research interests include applying a bioarchaeological approach to Mycenaean mortuary practices.

Vivian Staikou is an archaeologist of the Ephorate of Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. She studied Archaeology and Fine Arts in the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and received an MA in Prehistoric Archaeology from the University of Crete. Over the years she has carried out archaeological fieldwork in Attica, Achaea, Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. Her current research interests include lithic technologies, the Palaeolithic of Western Greece and the archaeology of the island of Lefkas. She also has a particular interest in developing educational programs for children.
Encounters, Excavations and Argosies Essays for Richard Hodges edited by John Mitchell, John Moreland and Bea Leal. iv+358 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 365 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916817. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916824. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Richard Hodges is one of Europe’s preeminent archaeologists. He has transformed the way we understand the early Middle Ages, and has put the past to work for the present, through a sequence of paradigmatic excavations in England, Italy and Albania. Encounters, Excavations and Argosies pays tribute to him with a series of reflections on some of the themes and issues which have been central to his work over the last forty years. The contributors are colleagues, many his students, above all friends of the man whose ideas, example, trust, and loyalty have touched and inspired us all.

About the Authors
John Mitchell first met Richard Hodges at Castel San Vincenzo in 1981, a jobbing art-historian dropping by to assess some excavated fresco-fragments, was hooked and has been working with him ever since, in Molise, southern Albania and more recently in Tuscany. He is Professor in the History of Art (emeritus) at the University of East Anglia.

John Moreland took his first Archaeology tutorial with Richard Hodges at the University of Sheffield in 1977. Richard also supervised his PhD, and they worked closely together on excavations at Roystone Grange (Derbyshire), San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), and Butrint (Albania). He is Professor of Historical Archaeology at the University of Sheffield.

Bea Leal studied metalwork at Camberwell Art College and history of art at the University of East Anglia, finishing her PhD there (on Images of Architecture in Late Antiquity) in 2016. Her interests are in the art and architecture of the late antique and early medieval Mediterranean, and especially the early Islamic period.
Time and Stone: The Emergence and Development of Megaliths and Megalithic Societies in Europe by Bettina Schulz Paulsson. xiv+376 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (71 plates in colour). 361 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916855. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916862. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This analysis is concerned with the dating of megaliths in Europe and is based on 2410 available radiocarbon results from pre-megalithic and megalithic sites, the megaliths' contemporaneous contexts and the application of a Bayesian statistical framework. It is, so far, the largest existing attempt to establish a supra-regional synthesis on the emergence and development of megaliths in Europe. Its aim is to assist in the clarification of an over 200-year-old, ongoing research debate.

About the Author
Dr. Bettina Schulz Paulsson obtained her MA in Prehistoric Archaeology/American Anthropology in 2005 at the Humboldt /Freie Universität in Berlin/Germany and her PhD in 2013 at the graduate school “Human development in Landscapes”/ Christian-Albrechts Universität Kiel. Recently, she has been appointed to the Department of History, at the University of Gothenborg/Sweden as a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Research Fellow, funded under the EC’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Initiative. Her main research is on the Neolithic, with a particular focus on scientific dating, megaliths, rock art studies, cognitive archaeology and symbolic systems.
Interpreting the Seventh Century BC Tradition and Innovation edited by Xenia Charalambidou and Catherine Morgan. viii+460pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 326 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915728. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915735. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book has its origin in a conference held at the British School at Athens in 2011 which aimed to explore the range of new archaeological information now available for the seventh century in Greek lands. It presents material data, combining accounts of recent discoveries (which often enable reinterpretation of older finds), regional reviews, and archaeologically focused critique of historical and art historical approaches and interpretations. The aim is to make readily accessible the material record as currently understood and to consider how it may contribute to broader critiques and new directions in research. The geographical focus is the old Greek world encompassing Macedonia and Ionia, and extending across to Sicily and southern Italy, considering also the wider trade circuits linking regional markets. The book does not aim for the pan- Mediterranean coverage of recent works: given that much of the latest innovative and critical scholarship has focused on the western Mediterranean in particular, it is necessary to bring old Greece back under the spotlight and to expose to critical scrutiny the often Athenocentric interpretative frameworks which continue to inform discussion of other parts of the Mediterranean.
Glassware and Glassworking in Thessaloniki 1st Century BC – 6th Century AD by Anastassios Ch. Antonaras. viii+384 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 colour plates). 360 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 27. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916794. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916800. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Glassware and Glassworking in Thessaloniki: 1st Century BC – 6th Century AD is a detailed examination of the production of glass and glass vessels in the eastern Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Age to the Early Christian period, analysing production techniques and decoration. The volume establishes the socio-economic framework of glassmaking and glassmakers’ social status in the Roman world generally and in Thessaloniki specifically, while identifying probable local products. Presented are all the excavation glass finds from Thessaloniki and its environs found between 1912 and 2002. A typological classification was created for almost 800 objects – which encompass the overwhelming majority of common excavation finds in the Balkans – as well as for the decorative themes that appear on the more valuable pieces. Comparative material from the entire Mediterranean was studied, verified in its entirety through primary publications. A summary of the excavation history of these vessels’ find-spots is provided, with details for each excavation, in many cases unpublished and identified through research in the archives of the relevant museums and Ephorates of Antiquities. The uses of glass vessels are presented, and there is discussion and interpretation of the reasons that permitted, or imposed, the choice of glass for their production. The finds are statistically analysed, and a chronological overview examining them century by century on the basis of use and place of production is given. Finally, there is an effort to interpret the data from the study in historical terms, and to incorporate the results into the political-economic evolution of the region’s political history. Relatively unfamiliar glassmaking terms are explained in a glossary of glassworking technology and typology terms. The material is fully documented in drawings and photographs, and every object in the catalogue is illustrated. A detailed index of the 602 geographical terms in the work, many unknown, concludes the book.

About the Author:
Anastassios C. Antonaras, a specialist in the history of glass, jewellery and textiles, is an archaeologist and curator at the Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki. His books include: Glassworking, Ancient and Medieval: Terminology, Technology and Typology; A Greek- English-English-Greek Dictionary; Roman and Early Christian Glassworking: Vessels from Thessaloniki and its Region (which received a prize from the Academy of Athens in 2010); Fire and Sand: Ancient Glass in the Princeton University Art Museum; and Artisanal Production in Ancient and Byzantine Thessaloniki: Archaeological, Literary and Epigraphic Evidence. Antonaras has organized numerous exhibitions and symposia, and has published numerous articles on objects from Thessaloniki. He currently serves on the board of the Christian Archaeological Association and is the secretary general of the International Association for the History of Glass.

L’artisanat dans les cites antiques de l’Algérie (Ier siècle avant notre ère –VIIe siècle après notre ère) by Touatia Amraoui. xx+426 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with one plate in colour. French text with English summary. 357 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 26. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916671. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916688. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Normally dealt with in a rather limited way, through the examination of a particular activity or geographical zone, the artisans of ancient North Africa are here, for the first time, the subject of an entire book. Focusing on urban production in Algeria during Antiquity, this critical study brings together new documentation drawn up on the basis of field data and the consultation of archives from a long history of survey in Algeria and France. This synthesis reviews the archaeological sites with workshops by defining their activities, at the same time as analyzing how they operated and looking at them typologically. Based on a comparison with documented workshops in the Western Roman world, the study of the techniques highlights the very strong similarities between the Roman regions but also the specific local variations of the methods used in Africa at this time. Maghreb ethnography shows the permanence of certain practices over time while attempting to reconstruct the "chaîne opératoire". Although it is still difficult to obtain an overall picture both from a spatial and a chronological point of view of the artisanal topography, the data reveals the existence of varied artisanal and commercial activities in urban areas throughout Antiquity.

French description: Abordé généralement de façon ponctuelle à travers une activité particulière ou une zone géographique donnée, l’artisanat en Afrique du nord antique fait ici pour la première fois l’objet d’un ouvrage. Centrée sur la production urbaine en Algérie durant l’Antiquité, cette étude critique rassemble une nouvelle documentation élaborée à partir des données de terrain et de la consultation des archives à partir d’un long travail d’enquête en Algérie et en France. La synthèse fait le point sur les sites archéologiques présentant des ateliers en définissant leur activité tout en analysant leur fonctionnement et leur typologie. En s’appuyant sur une comparaison avec les découvertes d’ateliers dans le monde romain occidental, l’étude des techniques met en évidence les similitudes très fortes entre les régions romaines mais aussi les spécificités locales des méthodes employées en Afrique durant cette période. L’ethnographie maghrébine montre quant à elle la permanence de certaines pratiques à travers le temps tout en complétant l’essai de restitution de la « chaîne opératoire ». S’il est encore difficile d’avoir une vision d’ensemble tant d’un point de vue spatial que chronologique de la topographie artisanale, les données recensées révèlent l’existence d’activités artisanales et commerciales variées incluses dans l’ensemble du domaine urbain tout au long de l’Antiquité.

Biographie: Actuellement membre de l’École des Hautes Études Hispaniques et Ibériques de la Casa de Velázquez à Madrid et à partir d’octobre 2017, chercheur au Centre Camille Jullian (CNRS, Aix-en-Provence), Touatia Amraoui est docteur en Histoire et Archéologie de l’Université Lumière Lyon 2. Elle est l’auteur d’articles sur l’artisanat et l’économie dans le Maghreb antique. Elle a collaboré à plusieurs projets de recherche internationaux en Algérie, au Maroc, en France, en Espagne et en Angleterre.
Ras il-Wardija Sanctuary Revisited A re-assessment of the evidence and newly informed interpretations of a Punic-Roman sanctuary in Gozo (Malta) by George Azzopardi. vi+82 pages; black & white illustrations throughout. 354 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916695. £19.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916701. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The secluded sanctuary on the coastal promontory of Ras il-Wardija on the central Mediterranean island of Gozo (near Malta) constitutes another landmark on the religious map of the ancient Mediterranean. Ritual activity at the sanctuary seems to be evidenced from around the 3rd century BC to the 2nd century AD and, possibly, even as late as the 4th century AD. This ritual activity was focused in a small built temple and in a rock-cut cave that seems to have incorporated a built extension in a later stage. But the practised cult or cults were aniconic and remained so largely throughout. This may explain why the sanctuary’s excavators did not report any findings of statuettes or any figural images. Contemporaneously, figural images were also venerated on other sites showing that, for a long while, iconism and aniconism co-existed on the Maltese islands. There might have been more than one deity venerated in this sanctuary. Dionysos could have been one of them. But whoever they were, they are likely to have been somehow connected with the sea and / or with a maritime community or communities as the sanctuary itself evidently was.

About the Author
George Azzopardi is a practising archaeologist hailing from the island of Gozo and is quite familiar with the site. His main research interests focus on the Classical period with the phenomenon of continuity as a marked backdrop. In line with this view, he directed his recent research on religious activity in Classical times as being often in continuity from earlier – sometimes, even prehistoric – traditions or inspired from earlier sources. To this effect, human history is seen as a continuum with hardly any identifiable beginnings or intervals.
El Sur de la Península Ibérica y el Mediterráneo Occidental: relaciones culturales en la segunda mitad del II milenio a.C. by Juan Manuel Garrido Anguita. 580 pages; illustrated throughout with 181 plates in colour. Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784916442. £65.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In ancient times, the first communities, societies and civilizations in the Iberian peninsula, according to archaeological evidence, began to develop following a progressive local evolution tempered by the significance of outside contacts. In order to reconstruct our history, resorting to ancient poets, we strive to distinguish reality from myth in the pursuit of a bond of certainty between the data provided by historical and literary sources and the excavated remains. Greek epics, based on the Illiad and the Odyssey, are the basis for the first speculations that link societies all along the Mediterranean coast, from east to west, with a common thread. However, how many times have we been told about mythical places, such as cities of great splendour and unique cultural progress? Did the land which Plato called Atlantis and Adolf Schulten linked to Tartessos truly exist? These answers may never be revealed (they are not at the forefront of research interests nowadays); for the time being, they are lost into a mythical and legendary world. Nonetheless, they remain alive over time.

Spanish description: En tiempos lejanos, ahora sepultadas bajo la caída de los años, comienzan a formarse las primeras comunidades, sociedades y civilizaciones que se irán desarrollando en la Península Ibérica, por una progresiva evolución local, sin descuidar la atención de los contactos foráneos previa contrastación arqueológica. Refugiándonos en figuras creadas por los antiguos poetas, tratamos de discernir entre lo que comúnmente se ha denominado mito-leyenda y lo real, buscando un vínculo de certeza entre los datos que revelan las fuentes literario-históricas y los vestigios que se desentierran de nuestra primera historia, aquella que tratamos de reconstruir. La épica occidental apoyada en los relatos homéricos de la Ilíada y la Odisea, son la base de las primeras conjeturas que con un hilo, unen a las sociedades que conviven en el Mar Mediterráneo desde Oriente hasta Occidente. Pero ¿cuántas veces hemos oído contar relatos sobre míticas ciudades de gran esplendor e inigualable progreso cultural? ¿Existió aquella tierra denominada por Platón “Atlántida” y que fue asociada por Adolf Schulten a Tartessos? Estas respuestas quizá nunca lleguen a desvelarse (tampoco están en la vanguardia de los intereses de la investigación), por ahora sólo están inmersas en un mundo mítico y legendario, pero es cierto que se mantienen vivas, nostálgicas, con el paso del tiempo.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Catalogue of Etruscan Objects in World Museum, Liverpool by Jean MacIntosh Turfa and Georgina Muskett. xiv+254 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white with 107 plates in colour. 349 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916381. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916398. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

One of the finest collections of Etruscan artifacts outside of Italy was begun in the 19th century by Joseph Mayer, goldsmith, of Liverpool. His donation of the collection became the core of Liverpool Museum, now World Museum, and has been augmented over the years by additional gifts and other acquisitions, such as those from the Wellcome Collection and Norwich Castle Museum. Much of the original material came from the necropolis of Vulci (Canino) when it was excavated by Lucien Bonaparte, Prince of Canino, while additional objects represent several other cities and sites. Already famous for its gold jewelry and bronze vessels of the 6th to the 4th centuries BCE, the Liverpool collection includes a fine selection of Etruscan vases, especially bucchero ware and Archaic painted vases, several scarab seals in semiprecious stones, a small number of carved ivories, and funerary urns, including that of Larui Helesa, in which were found gold earrings identical to those worn by her colorful effigy on its lid. A large group of bronze fibulae (safety-pins) furnish examples of most major types of these important ornaments of the Iron Age and Archaic periods. Engraved bronze mirrors and terracotta votives in the form of heads and body parts (such as uteri) of the 4th and 3rd centuries BCE illustrate myths and offerings that were essential to Etruscan religion. From a Villanovan sword to Hellenistic epitaphs, the Liverpool Etruscan and Italic collection offers a rare glimpse of early civilization in central Italy.

About the Authors

Jean MacIntosh Turfa has participated in excavations in the US and abroad, and was consultant for the Etruscan Gallery of the University of Pennsylvania Museum, where she is currently a Consulting Scholar and adjunct lecturer. Her publications cover Etruscan architecture, shipbuilding, trade and the Etruscan-Punic alliance, votive offerings, health, and divination. Her books include A Catalogue of the Etruscan Gallery of the University of Pennsylvania Museum (2005), Divining the Etruscan World: The Brontoscopic Calendar and Religious Practice (2012), The Etruscan World (editor, 2013), Women in Antiquity (with Stephanie Budin, editor, 2016) and, with Marshall J. Becker, The Etruscans and the History of Dentistry: The Golden Smile through the Ages (2017). She is proud to be a Foreign Member of the Istituto di Studi Etruschi ed Italica.

Georgina Muskett was formerly Curator of Classical Antiquities at National Museums Liverpool, where she continues to research the classical collections. She is an Associate of the department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology at the University of Liverpool, where she taught Aegean and Classical archaeology. One of Georgina’s research interests is Roman mosaics, and she is a member of the Executive Committee of the Association for the Study and Preservation of Roman Mosaics. She is the author of a number of books and articles, including Greek Sculpture (2012).
Roman Frontier Studies 2009 Proceedings of the XXI International Congress of Roman Frontier Studies (Limes Congress) held at Newcastle upon Tyne in August 2009 edited by Nick Hodgson, Paul Bidwell and Judith Schachtmann. Paperback edition; xxii+726 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 336 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 25. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915902. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915919. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The XXI International Congress of Roman Frontier studies was hosted by Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums in Newcastle upon Tyne (Great Britain) in 2009, 60 years after the first Limeskongress organised in that city by Eric Birley in 1949.

Sixty years on, delegates could reflect on how the Congress has grown and changed over six decades and could be heartened at the presence of so many young scholars and a variety of topics and avenues of research into the army and frontiers of the Roman empire that would not have been considered in 1949.

Papers are organised into the same thematic sessions as in the actual conference: Women and Families in the Roman Army; Roman Roads; The Roman Frontier in Wales; The Eastern and North African Frontiers; Smaller Structures: towers and fortlets; Recognising Differences in Lifestyles through Material Culture; Barbaricum; Britain; Roman Frontiers in a Globalised World; Civil Settlements; Death and Commemoration; Danubian and Balkan Provinces; Camps; Logistics and Supply; The Germanies and Augustan and Tiberian Germany; Spain; Frontier Fleets.

This wide-ranging collection of papers enriches the study of Roman frontiers in all their aspects.

About the Editors:
Nick Hodgson is Archaeological Projects Manager for Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums and has excavated for many years at South Shields, Wallsend and other sites on the northern frontier of Roman Britain. He has published widely on Iron Age and Roman archaeology and is the author of Hadrian’s Wall: Archaeology and History at the limit of Rome’s empire (2017).

Paul Bidwell was Head of Archaeology at Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums for almost three decades until his retirement in 2013. He has published numerous monographs, excavation reports and articles and is the author of Roman Forts in Britain (1997 and 2007). He is now an independent researcher and archaeological and heritage consultant.

Judith Schachtmann obtained an MA at Humboldt University, Berlin, with a comparison of German, British and Irish archaeological world heritage sites. For two years she was a researcher in the DFG (German Research Foundation) and is currently working on a PhD thesis on archaeological museums and exhibitions in Saxony during the national socialist era.


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Le guerrier, le chat, l’aigle, le poisson et la colonne: la voie spiralée des signes Approche sémiologique, structurale et archéologique du disque de Phaistos by Serge Collet. 90 pages; 15 tables, 1 colour illustration. French text with English Abstract and Foreword. 6 2017. ISBN 9781784916169. £14.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Phaistos Disc is one of the most studied documents of the Minoan civilization, enticing scholars and simple enthusiasts with the mysterious aura that envelops it and with its singularity among Minoan scriptures. It has entered the collective imagination, both at academic and popular levels. Representations of the Disc can be found abundantly in popular culture, from appearances in Mickey Mouse comics to a prop amidst the curios on the tables of a television magician.

It is this very overexposure that risks undermining the understanding of an object that is, first and foremost, an archaeological artefact found in a chronological and cultural context. Much has been said and much and has been written about the Disc. Collet brings a new approach. It’s not a deciphering but an interpretation, a depiction of the Minoan Weltanschauung through the symbols on the Disc and their connections with reality. This begins with the spiral-shaped construction of the inscription and its possible temporal allusions, and moves on to a structuralist view of use of the signs, and in which the repetitions take on almost ritual significance. Hence it is a pictorial interpretation rather than syllabic, whereby the pictograph is not intended as a rigid reproduction of logical discourse, but rather a path.

About the Author: Serge Collet (1950-2016) was a French scientist who became known for his interdisciplinary research on early sea-dependent societies. His main study “Uomini e Pesce, La caccia al pesce spada tra Scilla e Cariddi” as well as his publications with SAGE Publications over the years, as well as his several contributions to international conferences (inter alia funded by the EU and FAO) gave substantial examples as to what contributions maritime ethnology and archaeology can make for the preservation of cultures and the seas over the millennia.
SOMA 2014. Proceedings of the 18th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology Wrocław – Poland, 24-26 April 2014 edited by Blazej Stanislawski and Hakan Öniz. viii+192 pages; illustrated throughout with 35 plates in colour. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784914943. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The 18th annual meeting of the Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology (SOMA) was held in Wrocław-Poland, 24th to 26th April 2014.

Since prehistoric times the Mediterranean has acted as a stage for intense interactions between groups inhabiting regions that are now studied mainly within various sub-fields of ancient studies. In recent years, however, the development of research techniques and analytical models of archaeological evidence have identified similar historical paths that are similar, if not, in some cases, common to these disparate areas of the ancient world from West (Iberian peninsula) to East (Anatolia and Levant), from North (Europe, Black Sea Coast) to South (Maghreb and Egypt).

The 18th SOMA provided a forum for presentations related to the above-mentioned topics, as well as general themes such as the role of the sea, trade, colonization, even piracy, using archaeological data collected within contexts associated with the Mediterranean Basin and the area referred to as the Ancient Near East, ranging chronologically from the Prehistoric to Medieval periods. This current volume contains 22 papers selected from the 90 presented.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Excavations at the Mycenaean Cemetery at Aigion – 1967 Rescue Excavations by the late Ephor of Antiquities, E. Mastrokostas by Thanasis I. Papadopoulos and Evangelia Papadopoulou-Chrysikopoulou. vi+124 pages; illustrated throughout with 26 plates in colour. 343 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916183. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916190. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this monograph the authors present the finds of four Mycenaean chamber tombs, from the rescue excavation of Ephor Mastrokostas at Aigion in 1967. Unfortunately, no diary or any other information, regarding the architecture or the burial customs, was found. However, it is highly possible that they were similar to eleven tombs which were systematically excavated by Papadopoulos in 1970. In contrast with them, the four tombs produced a much greater number of finds, indicating richer burials. Furthermore, some of these finds are unique (e.g. “thronos”-straight-sided alabastron with unusual paneled decoration), rare (e.g. askoi) and exceptional (e.g. cylindrical stirrup jars) in the Achaean Mycenaean ceramic repertory, while the total absence of terracotta figurines as well as the rarity of small objects is surprising. Taken together the excavated tombs make a total of 15, but the actual number may be greater. It is noteworthy that the material is stylistically different and generally earlier from that of western Achaea. The supplementary information, provided by this publication, strengthens the evidence that this important Achaean cemetery was used for a long time (LHII-IIIC) and that the inhabitants had connections with the Argolid as well as with other areas to the east, especially with the Dodecanese.
Palaeolithic Pioneers: Behaviour, abilities, and activity of early Homo in European landscapes around the western Mediterranean basin ~1.3-0.05 Ma. by Michael J. Walker. 342 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916206. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916213. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaic humans were present for over a million years in western Mediterranean Europe where they left very many traces of their early stone-age activities and behaviour, and sometimes even human skeletal remains. This book evaluates archaeological findings about their life-ways at many important sites in Italy, southern France, and Spain, from the earliest ones 1,300,000 years ago, to those of Neanderthals fifty-thousand years ago, just before they were superseded by skeletally-“modern” humans. The cognitive and manual skills of archaic humans in western Mediterranean Europe are considered in the Pleistocene contexts of major climatic fluctuations and changing environmental circumstances. The book focusses on their remarkable capacity to adapt, frequently reinvent themselves, and persist for long periods of time, even though finally they did not endure. Their achievements and abilities withstand comparison to those of ancient humans in Africa or Asia during Early, Middle, and early Late Pleistocene times.

About the Author Michael Walker (Colchester, 1941) is Honorific Emeritus Professor in the Department of Zoology and Physical Anthropology at the University of Murcia in Spain, and directs field-work at Cueva Negra del Estrecho del Río Quípar (Caravaca, Murcia) and Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo (Torre Pacheco, Murcia). He studied at University College, Oxford, graduated in Animal Physiology and Medicine, took the Postgraduate Diploma in Prehistoric Archaeology and gained his D.Phil. for research in S.E. Spanish prehistory and palaeoanthropology. Following a junior research fellowship at The Queen’s College, Oxford, he lectured at the universities of Edinburgh and Sydney before being appointed in 1988 to establish Physical Anthropology at the University of Murcia. Paleoanthropologist Erik Trinkaus (Washington University of St. Louis) and Michael Walker have edited The People of Palomas, Neandertals from the Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, Southeastern Spain (Texas A&M University Press, 2017).
La ocupación humana del territorio de la comarca del río Guadalteba (Málaga) durante el Pleistoceno by Lidia Cabello Ligero. x+212 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text with English abstract. 338 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916121. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916138. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This investigation exhaustively gathers the archaeological evidence of the Palaeolithic human settlement in the Guadalteba river region (Malaga, Spain) during the Pleistocene. The main objective is to show the direct relationship between the reservoirs and the sources of raw materials, located in the fluvial terraces, in the geological outcrops and in the surface deposits. An important part of the work has been the geoarchaeological and archeometric surveys and the analysis of new lithic collections from surface archaeological surveys and recent systematic archaeological excavations in the Ardales Cave and Las Palomas de Teba Sima. In this sense, the methodological tools of other disciplines were used. Geoarchaeology enabled an understanding of the sedimentary and Post -depositional processes affecting the deposits and consequently its lithic industry. Archaeometry helped to see the petrographic features of lithic assemblies of deposits. These disciplines have been fundamental to propose a settlement pattern and mobility of these groups of Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers during the Pleistocene period in the interior of the province of Malaga, laying down a basic structure for future prehistoric investigations in the area.

Spanish Description: Una investigación que recoge de manera exhaustiva las evidencias arqueológicas del poblamiento humano Paleolítico en la comarca del río Guadalteba (Málaga, España) durante el Pleistoceno. El objetivo principal es mostrar la relación directa entre los yacimientos y las fuentes de materias primas, localizadas en las terrazas fluviales, en los afloramientos geológicos y en los propios yacimientos. Destacar la importancia del análisis del registro arqueológico de superficie, donde la prospección se convierte en la herramienta más efectiva para detectar yacimientos que han permanecido al aire libre, sobre todo del Paleolítico inferior y medio. De igual forma cobra especial relevancia el reconocimiento y la caracterización espacial y territorial, donde el artefacto se convierte en la unidad básica de investigación. Parte importante del trabajo han sido los muestreos geoarqueológicos y arqueométricos y el análisis de los nuevos conjuntos líticos procedentes de las prospecciones arqueológicas superficiales y de las recientes excavaciones arqueológicas sistemáticas, realizadas en la Cueva de Ardales y en la Sima de Las Palomas de Teba. En este sentido, hemos utilizado herramientas metodológicas de otras disciplinas, como la Geoarqueología, para comprender los procesos sedimentarios y postdeposicionales que afectan a los yacimientos y en consecuencia a su industria lítica, y la Arqueometría, para ver las características petrográficas de los conjuntos líticos, disciplinas fundamentales para proponer un patrón de asentamiento y movilidad de estos grupos de cazadores-recolectores del Pleistoceno. Este trabajo constituye un hito en la investigación del Paleolítico en el interior de la provincia de Málaga, convirtiéndose en una estructura básica para futuras investigaciones prehistóricas en la zona.