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NEW: When Archaeology Meets Communities: Impacting Interations in Sicily over Two Eras (Messina, 1861-1918) by Antonino Crisà. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+416 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £55.00). 446 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917913. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917920. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

When Archaeology Meets Communities examines the history of nineteenth-century Sicilian archaeology through the archival documentation for the excavations – official and casual – at Tindari, Lipari and nearby minor sites in the Messina province from Italy’s Unification to the end of the First World War (1861-1918). The area and historical period have been fully neglected by past scholars and need in-depth investigation. The substantial evidence includes sets of approximately six hundred new records and black and white images from Italian and UK archives.

The historical reconstruction, based on analysis of these records, lays the foundations for the entire volume and forms the basis from which the book develops innovative outlines on Sicilian archaeology. The structure follows this central concept. Furthermore, the volume seeks: a) to clarify relationships between the Italian Ministry of Public Education, the Museum of Palermo and local government authorities (‘3-level’ structure of interaction) and to pinpoint contacts with the contemporary social context; b) to compare archaeological research during the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies and the post-Unification period in northern Sicily in terms of methods, history of collecting, antiquities safeguarding and legislation; and c) to contextualise this work in terms of the evolution of archaeology and social change in the wider Italian and European contexts.

About the Author
ANTONINO CRISÀ is an archaeologist, ancient historian and numismatist, and currently research fellow at the University of Warwick, Department of Classics and Ancient History. He studied at the University of Milan (BA 2004, MA 2008) and worked as a ‘Classics Teaching Assistant’ at the University of Leicester (2012-16), where he obtained his PhD in Archaeology (2015). As a field archaeologist, he has excavated in Sicily (Tindari), Sardinia (Nora), northern Italy (Milano, Calvatone, Bagnolo San Vito, Adria, Bergamo, Casale sul Sile) and Syria (Palmyra). His research explores numismatics and the history of archaeology in Sicily between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (antiquarianism, coin collectors, nineteenth-century archaeological excavations, archives and museum collection). Dr Crisà has been honoured by the publication of his best numismatic papers within the Italian National Competition for Young Numismatists (Cronaca Numismatica) (2006) and Premio M. Cagiati – XV International Numismatic Congress of Taormina (Accademia Italiana di Studi Numismatici) (2015).
NEW: Travellers in Ottoman Lands The Botanical Legacy edited by Ines Aščerić-Todd, Sabina Knees, Janet Starkey and Paul Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; xxii+358 pages; 2 maps, 7 tables, 167 figures (139 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 438 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919153. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919160. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This collection of around twenty papers has its origins in a two-day seminar organised by the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) in conjunction with the Centre for Middle Eastern Plants at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh (RBGE), with additional support from Cornucopia magazine and the Turkish Consulate General, Edinburgh. This multi-disciplinary event formed part of the Ottoman Horizons festival held in Edinburgh in 2017 and attracted a wide range of participants from around the world, including several from Turkey and other parts of the Middle East.

This splendidly illustrated book focuses on the botanical legacy of many parts of the former Ottoman Empire — including present-day Turkey, the Levant, Egypt, the Balkans, and the Arabian Peninsula — as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region. The papers cover a wide variety of subjects, including Ottoman garden design and architecture; the flora of the region, especially bulbs and their cultural significance; literary, pictorial and photographic depictions of the botany and horticulture of the Ottoman lands; floral and related motifs in Ottoman art; culinary and medicinal aspects of the botanical heritage; and efforts related to conservation.

About the Editors
DR INES AŠČERIĆ-TODD is a Teaching Fellow in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include social and cultural history of the Middle East and the Ottoman Empire, Sufism and dervish orders. She is the author of Dervishes and Islam in Bosnia: Sufi Dimensions to the Formation of Bosnian Muslim Society, in the Brill series ‘The Ottoman Empire and its Heritage’ (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2015).

DR SABINA KNEES has edited the Flora of the Arabian Peninsula and Socotra, since 2005. Before joining The Centre for Middle Eastern Plants (CMEP) at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) in 2005, Sabina was a principal editor on the European Garden Flora, and a Stanley Smith Research Fellow based at the RBGE. Sabina is a member of the Horticultural Taxonomy Group (Hortax), the IUCN SSC Arabian Plant Specialist Group and the Executive Committee of the Friends of Socotra.

DR JANET STARKEY has edited the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies since 2007. A former lecturer at Durham University, she has published extensively on travellers in the Middle East. Her most recent book, The Scottish Enlightenment Abroad: the Russells of Braidshaw in Aleppo and on the Coast of Coromandel (Leiden & Boston: Brill), was published in March 2018.

PROFESSOR PAUL STARKEY, a specialist in Arabic literature and culture, is Emeritus Professor at Durham University and is currently Vice-President of the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) and Chairman of the Banipal Trust for Arab Literature. His translation of The Book of the Sultan’s Seal by Youssef Rakha won the 2015 Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation, and his translation of The Shell by Mustafa Khalifa won a Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding in 2017.
NEW: The Luwians of Western Anatolia Their Neighbours and Predecessors by Fred Woudhuizen. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+162 pages; 35 illustrations, 11 tables (3 colour plates). 405 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918279. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918286. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In scholarly literature, there is much attention given to the Hittites and the Mycenaean Greeks, but the Luwians of Western Anatolia are notoriously neglected. Therefore, a study focussing on the latter is desirable. In this book, the presently available information on the western Luwians is assembled. This entails, primarily, the epigraphic evidence in the form of Luwian hieroglyphic inscriptions from the region and the historical information which can be deduced from it, as well as historical Hittite sources. As a prerequisite for the reconstruction of the history of the western Luwians during the Middle and Late Bronze Ages, the thorny question of the geography of their habitat needs to be tackled. This can now be done in an adequate manner owing to the most recent discoveries. Apart from Luwian hieroglyphic, the Luwians of Western Anatolia also used cuneiform script. Based on the linguistic data from both categories of evidence, a sketch of their language is presented. It must be realized, though, that not all inhabitants of Western Anatolia were speakers of the Luwian language. Thus, it will be argued that their northern neighbours in the Troad spoke a different language, of Thraco-Phrygian type. Finally, the Luwians were not autochthonous in the region, but preceded by speakers of a different Indo-European tongue, most adequately defined as Old Indo-European in Hans Krahe’s terms.

About the Author
FRED WOUDHUIZEN, born in 1959, graduated in Mediterranean Pre- and Protohistory at the University of Amsterdam (1985). He earned his PhD in 2006 at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, with a dissertation on ‘The Ethnicity of the Sea Peoples’. As an expert Luwologist, he is well-known for his books and articles on the Luwian dialects of Anatolia and the wider Aegean. Among his books, mention should be made of ‘Luwian Hieroglyphic Monumental Rock and Stone Inscriptions from the Hittite Empire Period’ (2004) and ‘Selected Luwian Hieroglyphic Texts: The Extended Version’ (2011).

Table of Contents
Preface; 1. The Homeland of the Luwians; 2. Geography of Western Anatolia; 3. Origin of the Luwian Hieroglyphic Script; 4. Luwian Hieroglyphic Evidence on the Great Kingdom of Assuwa; 5. Western Anatolia under Hittite Rule; 6. Western Anatolia in the Final Stage of the Bronze Age; 7. Amenhotep III: Historical Background to his Aegean Policy; 8. The Arzawan Language; 9. The Language of the Trojans; 10. Evidence for an Old Indo-European Substrate in Western Anatolia; Bibliography
FORTHCOMING: How did the Persian King of Kings Get His Wine? The upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) by Anthony Comfort and Michał Marciak. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+148 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (46 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 457 2018. ISBN 9781784919566. Book contents pageBuy Now

How did the Persian King of Kings Get His Wine? the upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) explores the upper valley of the Tigris during antiquity. The area is little known to scholarship, and study is currently handicapped by the security situation in southeast Turkey and by the completion during 2018 of the Ilısu dam. The reservoir being created will drown a large part of the valley and will destroy many archaeological sites, some of which have not been investigated. The course of the upper Tigris discussed here is the section from Mosul up to its source north of Diyarbakır; the monograph describes the history of the river valley from the end of the Late Assyrian empire through to the Arab conquests, thus including the conflicts between Rome and Persia. It considers the transport network by river and road and provides an assessment of the damage to cultural heritage caused both by the Saddam dam (also known as the Eski Mosul dam) in Iraq and by the Ilısu dam in south-east Turkey. A catalogue describes the sites important during the long period under review in and around the valley. During the period reviewed this area was strategically important for Assyria’s relations with its northern neighbours, for the Hellenistic world’s relations with Persia and for Roman relations with first the kingdom of Parthia and then with Sassanian Persia.

About the Authors
ANTHONY COMFORT is an independent scholar associated with the Centre for the Study of Greek and Roman Antiquity at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. After a career in the secretariat of the European Parliament, he completed a doctoral dissertation dealing with the roads on the frontier between Rome and Persia at Exeter University under the supervision of Stephen Mitchell. He is a specialist in the use of satellite imagery for archaeology in the Middle East but is now responsible for a project concerning the Roman roads of south-west France, where he lives.

MICHAL MARCIAK, PhD (2012), Leiden University, is an Assistant Professor at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków (Poland). He has published extensively on Northern Mesopotamia, including two monographs Izates, Helena, and Monobazos of Adiabene (Harrassowitz, 2014) and Sophene, Gordyene, and Adiabene: Three Regna Minora of Northern Mesopotamia Between East and West (Brill, 2017). He is currently also the Principal Investigator of the Gaugamela Project (in cooperation with the Land of Nineveh Archaeological Project of the University of Udine, Italy) which is dedicated to the identification of the site of the Battle of Gaugamela (331 BCE).
NEW: Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems Meanings and interpretations by Idit Sagiv. Paperback; 175x245mm; vi+198 pages; 98 illustrations (51 plates in colour). (Print RRP £35.00). 439 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918699. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918705. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Whereas animals are a frequent depiction on gemstones within the Greek and Roman periods, and play a key role in symbolic representations on these engraved gems, they have generally been overlooked with little in the way of focussed academic study.

In the present research, a large group of Greek and Roman gems (intaglios) bearing depictions of animals was selected. The gems are presented through a detailed study of the themes described in an attempt to form a comprehensive approach to the depictions of animals and their significance on Greek and Roman gems. The work examines the associations between animal depictions and the type of gemstone and its believed qualities. The study also discusses the changes in representation of animals on gems compared to other, larger media, and questions the significance of these changes. It is concluded here that as far as animal motifs are concerned, the gems could be accorded with a deeper symbolism, such as good luck, abundance and fertility, health, success, and victory. All these motifs are perceived as capable of weakening hostile forces. The animals engraved can also symbolise nature's abundance and fertility, especially when represented along with their offspring, pasturing and grazing, or accompanied by such fertility symbols as cornucopia, ears of corn, and wine goblets. Other animals are related to certain gods, and even comprise their attributes, and thus it was believed that the owner of an engraved gem was accorded divine protection.

About the Author
Dr. Idit Sagiv is a researcher of Classical Art. She completed her MA and PhD studies at Tel Aviv University. Her research and publications focus on Greek and Roman engraved gems. Since 2016, she is an academic member of the History of Art Department, Tel-Aviv University, where she teaches courses on Classical Art.
NEW: Coins in Rhodes From the monetary reform of Anastasius I until the Ottoman conquest (498 - 1522) by Anna-Maria Kasdagli. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+444 pages; 139 figures, 154 plates (7 colour pages). 437 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918415. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918422. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Coins in Rhodes: From the monetary reform of Anastasius I until the Ottoman conquest (498 – 1522) presents the Byzantine and medieval coins collected by Greek archaeologists in Rhodes over a period of more than sixty years. It includes lists of excavated land plots, stray finds, an illustrated catalogue of all the Byzantine and local coins up to 1309, and a representative sample of the Hospitaller petty coins as well as all the Western coins found. Hoard evidence helps sort various emissions and their dates between c. 1320 – c. 1420.

After a chapter introducing the reader to the archaeology of Rhodes, the nature of the material and the way it has been handled, the coins are set against the reconsidered backdrop of local history from 498 to 1522, tracing fluctuations in circulation and attempting to explore their significance. Particular care is taken over the transitional 13th century, when fragmentation of power in the region has made the scanty documentary evidence very hard to assess.

Different approaches have been applied, depending on the available evidence integral to the material and that available from other sources. The archaeology of Rhodes across ten centuries presents all the difficulties of disturbed stratigraphy and recycling of structures expected of an intensively used site. The work aspires to promote a way of dealing with quantities of finds from large-scale rescue excavation that will help other scholars date contexts more accurately and review or compare their own data from this or other sites.

About the Author
ANNA-MARIA KASDAGLI BA (University of Birmingham, UK); MA, PhD (University of Athens, Greece) is an archaeologist, employed by the Greek Ministry of Culture in Rhodes since 1986. She is involved in restoration projects, rescue excavation, heritage protection and heritage awareness promotion. She has published papers on Byzantine and Hospitaller coins, epigraphics, medieval monuments of Rhodes and a volume on Hospitaller architectural sculpture.
NEW: Estudios sobre el África romana Culturas e Imaginarios en transformación edited by Fabiola Salcedo Garcés with Estefanía Benito Lázaro and Sergio España-Chamorro. Paperback; 205x290mm; xvi+352 pages; illustrated throughout black & white with 2 plates in colour. Spanish text with English preface and abstracts. 430 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 39. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919078. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919085. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This collective work, carried out by both senior and beginning researchers, is for those scholars who have their gaze fixed on the fascinating mosaic of cultures that was the North-African world from the moment Rome appeared in the region. Even before this date, the arrival of Phoenicians on the continent and their subsequent spread throughout the north of it, initiated a rich process of contacts, interchanges and relations with the Libyan-Berber populations that inhabited the zone from time immemorial. To this scene of ancient cultural diversity –which also included an Egyptian component– Rome brought its own riches, generating in the region new episodes of cultural and religious syncretism.

All these subjects are treated in the present book through some specific scientific contributions whose geopolitical frame is the whole Proconsular Africa. Most of the articles in this volume are dedicated to the world of images, but others also treat many other issues as Historiography, Archaeology of Architecture, Libyan-Berber ethnicities and even cultural parallels between North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula.

About the Editors
FABIOLA SALCEDO GARCÉS is Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Complutense University of Madrid. In 1991 she moved to Rome to write her doctoral thesis about the Iconography of the Roman provinces, in particular, the province of Africa, at the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología de Roma (EEHAR, CSIC). The result of that research was the book Africa. Iconografía de una provin¬cia romana (Rome-Madrid, CSIC, 1996). During her long stay in Rome, she began to work in the Tusculum project, developed also by the EEHAR, as well as the Soprintendenza Archeologica per il Lazio. In this case, she was specifically devoted to the study of the collection of sculptural materials belonging to the city and to the villas of the Tusculan surroundings. Due to this research she published the volume Tusculana Marmora. Escultura clásica en el antiguo Tusculano (CSIC, Madrid, 2016). She has worked in Pompeii («Casa de la Diana Arcaizante» project) and she currently directs several investigations focusing on Roman Africa studies. Her works have been diffused in prestigious publications, internationally (Ostraka, Antiquités Africaines, LIMC), and nationally (Archivo Español de Arque¬ología, Lucentum, Studia Historica, Iberia, among others).

ESTEFANÍA BENITO LÁZARO is researcher of the Arqueología Africana Group and of others investigation projects developed at the Complutense University of Madrid. She is specialist in the Libyan-Berber world, subject to which she dedicates her current doctoral thesis. She has carried out several stays of research in Tunisia and in relevant scientific European institutions, as the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (EEHAR, CSIC).

SERGIO ESPAÑA CHAMORRO is Doctor in Ancient World Studies by the Complutense University of Madrid. He currently works as postdoctoral researcher at the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (EEHAR, CSIC) and Associated Professor of the Isabel I University. His investigations are focused on Landscape Archaeology in the Baetica, Africa and Italy, besides his participation in research projects on domestic spaces in Pompeii and the Roman sculpture of Carthage. He has also worked in prestigious scientific institutions, as the University of Southampton, the centre CIL of the Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, the “Aldo Moro” University of Bari and the Musei dei Fori Imperiali-Mercati di Traiano (Rome).

Spanish Description
Esta obra colectiva, llevada a cabo por investigadores seniors y jóvenes, va dirigida a aquellos estudiosos con la mirada puesta en el fascinante mosaico de culturas que fue el mundo norteafricano cuando Roma hizo su aparición en la región. Ya antes de esa fecha, la llegada de fenicios
NEW: Settlement and Land Use on the Periphery: The Bouros-Kastri Peninsula, Southern Euboia by Jere M. Wickens, Susan I. Rotroff, Tracey Cullen, Lauren E. Talalay, Catherine Perlès, and Floyd W. McCoy. 274pp; illustrated throughout in black & white. 410 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918194. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918200. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Bouros-Kastri peninsula at the south-eastern tip of the Greek island of Euboia has previously been overlooked in the archaeological literature. This survey by the Southern Euboea Exploration Project, conducted under the aegis of the Canadian Institute in Greece, now provides a wealth of intriguing information about fluctuations in long-term use and habitation in this part of the Karystia. While the peninsula is agriculturally poor, its coast is blessed with several small coastal inlets and one important ancient port, Geraistos. These provide access to vital maritime routes and connect the peninsula to Athens and other Aegean ports. The survey revealed modest use of the peninsula during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age; it was then virtually abandoned for the following two and a half millennia. Occupation resumed in the Late Archaic–Early Classical period, followed by near desertion in the 3rd century BC of all but some coastal sites, a resurgence of activity in the Late Roman period, and modest use in Byzantine and Ottoman times. The authors analyse the ways in which the peninsula's use was connected to that of the main urban centre at Karystos, and how the peninsula and the greater Karystia were integrated into the political, economic, and cultural spheres of Athens and the broader region.

About the Authors
JERE M. WICKENS, a co-director of the Southern Euboea Exploration Project, is interested in the use of rural areas and the use of caves. Outside of the Karystia, he has conducted fieldwork in Albania and Attica, Greece, where he is conducting a diachronic study of the use of caves and rock shelters.

SUSAN I. ROTROFF has published several volumes on the Hellenistic pottery of the Athenian Agora and of Sardis, in Turkey, and is particularly interested in the use of pottery to reconstruct the activities of people of the past. She is a MacArthur Fellow and winner of the Gold Medal of the Archaeological Institute of America.

TRACEY CULLEN is an Aegean prehistorian who has participated in fieldwork in Greece and Cyprus, focusing on the study of early ceramics and funerary customs. She served as Associate Editor of the American Journal of Archaeology and later as Editor of Hesperia, and currently lives in northern Minnesota (USA).

LAUREN E. TALALAY is an Aegean prehistorian who focuses on the Neolithic period of Greece and the Mediterranean. Her research explores the use of the human body as a symbol, figurines, and gender. She also publishes on contemporary issues, particularly on the employment of archaeological and mythical images in modern advertising and political cartoons. The former Associate Director and Curator at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, University of Michigan, she is currently Curator Emerita and Research Associate at the Kelsey Museum.

CATHERINE PERLÈS is a specialist of Greek Prehistoric stone tools and of the Greek Neolithic. She has worked extensively on trade networks and holds an Honorary degree from Indiana University.

FLOYD W. MCCOY is a geoarchaeologist/geologist with research emphasis on the interaction of volcanism and climate change with ancient and modern cultures both in Hawaii and Greece. He is professor in geology, geophysics, and oceanography at the University of Hawaii.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction; Previous Research by SEEP in the Karystia; Archaeological Work on the Bouros-Kastri Peninsula; Goals and Scope of the Bouros-Kastri Survey; Chapter 2: Topography, Geology, and Tectonics; Topography; Geology and Tectonics of Southern Euboia; Geomorphology; Tectonics, Sea-Level Changes, and Palaeoclimates; Paleozoic–Mesozoic Bedrock; Cenozoic Rocks and Sediments; Soils; Natural Resources; Natural Hazards; Chapter 3: Chronological Overview of the Karystia; Prehistory; Late Neolithic; Final Neolithic; Early Bronze Age; Middle Bronze Age; Late Bronze Age; Historical Periods; Early
FORTHCOMING: A Bestiary of Monsters in Greek Mythology by Spyros Syropoulos. Paperback; 148x210mm; viii+140 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 colour plates). (Print £19.99). 451 2018. ISBN 9781784919504. Book contents pageBuy Now

Greek myths abound in images of beauty and perfection: charming gods, attractive goddesses, and handsome heroes, all of them standards of physical and spiritual flawlessness. However, the ancient Greeks were not fond of absolutes. No god or hero is shown without blemishes in character and ethics, and some are even physically imperfect, like Hephaestus, who is ugly and lame. Another element that dominates Greek mythology is the idea of balance. Good and evil, light and darkness, hubris and punishment. What could not be missing from this world is the image of reversed beauty: monstrosity. The aim of this book is to explore the realm of the imaginary world of Greek mythology and present the reader with a categorization of monstrosity, referring to some of the most noted examples in each category.

About the Author
SPYROS SYROPOULOS is an Associate Professor of Ancient Greek Literature at the Dept of Mediterranean Studies of the University of the Aegean in Rhodes. He is the acting Vice-Rector of the University of the Aegean (2014-2018). Since 2006, he teaches Ancient Greek Theater at the Open University of Greece. He is the director of the Masters Course ‘Theater as a social and political institution during antiquity’ at the Department of Mediterranean Studies of the University of the Aegean. He is the founder and editor of the electronic journal ELECTRYONE (http://www.electryone.gr) and since 2017 he is the General Secretary of the Greek delegation at the European University Association.
FORTHCOMING: Winifred Lamb: Aegean Prehistorian and Museum Curator by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 148x210mm; 340pp. (Print RRP £30.00). 448 2018 Archaeological Lives . ISBN 9781784918798. Buy Now

Winifred Lamb was a pioneering archaeologist in the Aegean and Anatolia. She studied classics at Newnham College, Cambridge, and subsequently served in naval intelligence alongside J. D. Beazley during the final stages of the First World War. As war drew to a close, Sydney Cockerell, Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, invited Lamb to be the honorary keeper of Greek antiquities. Over the next 40 years she created a prehistoric gallery, marking the university’s contribution to excavations in the Aegean, and developed the museum’s holdings of classical bronzes and Athenian figure-decorated pottery. Lamb formed a parallel career excavating in the Aegean. She was admitted as a student of the British School at Athens and served as assistant director on the Mycenae excavations under Alan Wace and Carl Blegen. After further work at Sparta and on prehistoric mounds in Macedonia, Lamb identified and excavated a major Bronze Age site at Thermi on Lesbos. She conducted a brief excavation on Chios before directing a major project at Kusura in Turkey. She was recruited for the Turkish language section of the BBC during the Second World War, and after the cessation of hostilities took an active part in the creation of the British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara.

About the Author
David Gill is Professor of Archaeological Heritage at the University of Suffolk and Visiting Research Fellow in the School of History at the University of East Anglia. He is a former Rome Scholar at the British School at Rome, and Sir James Knott Fellow at Newcastle University. He was responsible for the Greek and Roman collections at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, before moving to Swansea University as Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Introduction
Chapter 1 - The Lamb Family and Early Years
Chapter 2 - Cambridge and Classics
Chapter 3 - The Hope Vases and Naval Intelligence
Chapter 4 - The First Year in Athens (1920–21)
Chapter 5 - Prehistory and the Fitzwilliam Museum
Chapter 6 - Mycenae, Sparta and Macedonia
Chapter 7 - The Fitzwilliam Museum: Developing the Classical Collections
Chapter 8 - The Eastern Aegean: Lesbos and Chios
Chapter 9 - Anatolia and Kusura
Chapter 10 - The War Years
Chapter 11 - The British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara
Bibliography
Index
FORTHCOMING: To Die in Style! The Residential Lifestyle of Feasting and Dying in Iron Age Stamna, Greece by Gioulika Christakopoulou. Paperback; 175x245pp; 100pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £22.00). 445 2018. ISBN 9781784919351. Buy Now

Symposium in Stamna both as a concept and as a process involved the presence of prominent citizens of the social establishment, as testified by the large cauldrons, tripod jars and tripod vessels present. This study re-examines the cemeteries studied to date, isolating tombs with unique architecture or peculiar structures with individual features, in order to investigate the complex identity of the elite group ideologies.

The finding and studying of such a large number of PRG tombs (500 ca) presents a good representative example for discussing the perception of death, and how it was confronted through the mourning ritual. The data also presents an opportunity to examine the creation of individual and collective memory in a population that operated in this privileged location, redefining as such the cultural landscape of the Protogeometric era. The pre-existing theoretical framework, the methodology of the managing and displaying of grief and their correlation with already-studied and exalted geographical parallels, integrate Stamna into the cultural chain of populations ruled by an overall-systematic design of a particular cultural ideology.
About the Author
GIOULIKA–OLGA CHRISTAKOPOULOU was born in Patras in 1968 and holds a degree in History and Archaeology from the University of Ioannina, and a PhD in Archaeology from the National Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. For the past twenty-five years she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities in Achaia, Greece. She also worked as a Lecturer until 2014, teaching ‘Ancient Monumental Topography’ in the Department of Museology, Museography and Exhibition Planning, at the University of Applied Studies, Western Greece. She has dedicated special attention to the study of the Iron Age in Ancient Stamna, Aetolia, and her research and publications focus on the population movement, burial architecture and burial rituals of this period.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
The Banquet through the Burial Testimony.
A. The tomb evidence.
B. Material evidence of consumption: The ceramic dinner sets.
C. Bronze vessels.
D. Complementary feasting equipment: Spits, Hooks and Knives.
Fare thee well. The Stamna Timeless Farewell.
Feasting and Dying in a lebes
an institutional innovation with an international appeal.
Symposium, Religion and Cult portrayed through successive layers of burials, (semi)circular constructions and pyres.
“Consuming” with the dead.
"In Darkness We Trust"; References
FORTHCOMING: Papers in Italian Archaeology VII: The Archaeology of Death Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, April 16-18, 2016 edited by Edward Herring & Eòin O’Donoghue. Paperback; 205x290mm; 504pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (Print RRP £70.00). 435 2018. ISBN 9781784919214. Buy Now

This volume presents the proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held in Galway, Ireland, in April 2016. More than 60 papers, with contributors from the British Isles, Italy and other parts of continental Europe, and North and South America, consider recent developments in Italian archaeology from the Neolithic to the modern period. Each region of Italy is represented, with specific sections of the volume devoted to Etruria, South Italy, and Sicily. Other sections have a chronological focus, including Italian Prehistory, the Roman period, and Post Antiquity. Following the primary theme of the meeting, the majority of papers revolve around the archaeology of death; numerous contributions analyse the cultural significance of death through examinations of funerary rituals and mortuary practices, while others analyse burial data for evidence of wider social and political change. Various papers consider new and recent discoveries in Italian archaeology, while others ask fresh questions of older datasets. In addition, several contributions showcase their employment of new methodologies deriving from technological innovations. The volume opens with a dedicatory section to mark the achievements of the Accordia Research Institute, and to celebrate the careers of two of its founders, Ruth Whitehouse and John Wilkins.

About the Editors
Edward Herring is Senior Lecturer in Classics at National University of Ireland, Galway. His principal research area is the archaeology of South Italy in the first millennium BC. A Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries since 2006, he held the A.D. Trendall Fellowship at the Institute of Classical Studies in London in 2011. His publications include ‘Explaining Change in the Matt-Painted Pottery of Southern Italy’ (Oxford, 1998), (with R.D. Whitehouse and J.B. Wilkins) ‘Botromagno: Excavation and Survey at Gravina in Puglia, 1979-1985’ (London, 2000), and ‘Patterns in the Production of Apulian Red-Figure Pottery’ (Newcastle, forthcoming 2018).

Eóin O’Donoghue is based in the Department of Classics at Brock University, Canada. He specialises in Etruscan and Roman archaeology and excavates at Murlo with the Poggio Civitate Excavation Project and on the island of Pantelleria with the Brock University Archaeological Project at Pantelleria.
FORTHCOMING: Handel in Krisenzeiten: Ägyptische-mykenische Handelsbeziehungen in der Ramessidenzeit by Birgit Schiller. Paperback; 205x290mm; 266pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. German text with English summary. 434 2018. ISBN 9781784918675. Buy Now

This book provides an overview of the sites of Mycenaean pottery finds in Egypt and Nubia. Data from thirty-six sites in Egypt and twelve sites in Nubia are presented. The context of the vessels and sherds dates from the reign of Akhenaten (18th Dynasty) to that of Ramesses VI (20th Dynasty). The imported vessels were found in the capital cities as well as in fortresses, other cities and tombs. Stirrup jars and flasks came to light frequently.

Copies of Mycenaean stirrup jars made from clay, faience and stone were also found. The oldest sherd of an imitation vessel was found in Amarna; hence, the Mycenaean vessel shape (stirrup jar prevailing) was copied outside of Mycenaean Greece in the 18th Dynasty and filled with local liquids—possibly oil—and traded with Egypt. Egyptians not only imported vessels from the Levant but also produced imitation vessels themselves. Apparently, these vessels circulated only within Egypt.

Chemical analyses of sherds from different sites reveal that the vessels found in 18th Dynasty contexts were made on the Mycenaean mainland. During the Ramesside period (19th–20th Dynasty) trading contacts with Mycenaean Greece shifted to Cyprus, where high quality Mycenaean pottery was produced.

About the Author
Birgit Schiller studied Egyptology and Classical Archaeology (prioritising Bronze Age Archaeology) at the Humboldt University of Berlin. She completed her MA in Egyptology and wrote her PhD thesis in Classical Archaeology. Her defence of the thesis was made in 2012.

German Description: Dieses Buch gibt eine Übersicht über die in Ägypten und Nubien gefundene mykenische Keramik. An 36 Orten in Ägypten und an 12 verschiedenen Stellen in Nubien kam sie ans Tageslicht. Zeitlich reichen die Funde von der Regierungszeit Echnatons (18. Dynastie) bis zu Ramses VI. (20. Dynastie). Die Gefäße wurden im Wohnbereich, mithin bei den Lebenden, wie auch als Grabbeigabe, für das Leben im Jenseits verwendet. Das militärische Personal wurde ebenfalls mit mykenischen Produkten, vermutlich Öl, versorgt.

Eine Auflistung der Nachahmungen mykenischer Bügelkannen, die aus Ton, Fayence und Stein (Kalzit) gefertigt wurden, findet sich ebenfalls hier. Die älteste Nachahmung (sog. Simple Style-Keramik) stammt aus Amarna, so dass deren Import etwa gleichzeitig mit dem Import der Ware aus dem mykenischen Gebiet beginnt. So sind sie teils aus der Levante kommend mit lokaler Flüssigkeit – vermutlich Öl – nach Ägypten verhandelt worden. Auch die Ägypter haben ihrerseits die Bügelkanne nachgemacht, wobei gerade die Tongefäße wohl eher für den heimischen Markt gedacht waren.

Chemische Analysen des Tons haben ergeben, dass die Keramik, die in Kontexten der 18. Dynastie gefunden wurde, aus dem mykenischen Kernland, der Argolis, stammt. Während der Ramessidenzeit (19.-20. Dynastie) verlagerte sich der Handel nach Zypern, wo hochwertige mykenische Keramik hergestellt wurde.

Die Autorin studierte an der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Ägyptologie und Klassische Archäologie, wo sie den Schwerpunkt auf die Ägäische Bronzezeit legte. Sie schloss das Studium mit dem Magister in Ägyptologie ab und schriebt ihre Doktorarbeit in der Klassischen Archäologie zur mykenischen Keramik in Ägypten. Die Arbeit wurde 2012 verteidigt.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Vorwort; Summary; 1 - Einleitung; 2 - Der Handel im 13. Jh. v. Chr.; 3 - Mykenische und mykenisierende Importkeramik in Ägypten ; 4 - Mykenische und mykenisierende Importkeramik in Nubien ; 5 - Zusammenfassung: Mykenische Keramik in Ägypten und Nubien ; 6 - Imitate mykenischer Keramik in Ägypten und Nubien; 7 - ‚Krisenzeiten‘; 8 - Handel mit Olivenöl im Neuen Reich ; 9 - Der Handel im 12. Jh. v. Chr.; 10 - Schluß ; Bibliographie; Register der Gefäßtypen; Register der Museen und Archive; Register der Imitate aus Ägypten und Nubien; Abbildungsnachweis; Appendix: Sesebi; Katalog; Karten; Ta
FORTHCOMING: Oikèma ou pièce polyvalents: recheerches sur une installation commerciale de l’Antiquité grecque by Pavlos Karvonis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 110pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. (Print RRP £30.00). 60 2018. ISBN 9781784919399. Buy Now

In this volume, Pavlos Karvonis discusses the evolution of oikema, which is the most common type of commercial facility in ancient Greece. The study covers a large area including Continental Greece, the Aegean islands, the Ionian islands and the west coast of Asia Minor. The author, after a thorough analysis, proposes a new terminology for commercial and industrial facilities. Karvoins also presents the architectural characteristics and the equipment of oikemata and discusses their location and relationship with other buildings. The ownership, use and maintenance of oikemata are also discussed. It is argued that oikemata provided merchants and craftsmen with a suitable working space and contributed to the gradual abandonment of houses as working places, especially in cities that developed in the Hellenistic period. Their characteristics corresponded perfectly well to the needs of Greek commerce.

PAVLOS KARVONIS studied archaeology in Athens from 1994 to 1998. In 2000, he finished his Masters degree at the University of Paris X-Nanterre and in 2004 he defended a thesis entitled “Lieux et locaux de vente dans la Grèce égéenne du IVe au Ier siècle av. J.-C.” at the same University. In 2006, he worked for the Archaeological Society at Athens, and since 2007 he has been working for the Academy of Athens in the Tabula Imperii Romani program. He has published two volumes on the Aegean islands and Attica, and has published several articles on commercial architecture. He is also preparing the publications of two commercial buildings located on the western shore of the island and participates in a research programme on stone and its use on Delos.

Table of Contents
Introduction; Nomenclature
Le vocabulaire antique des installations commerciales
Les critères d’identification des pièces polyvalentes
L’apparition de la pièce polyvalente
Les activités attestées dans les pièces polyvalentes
Les caractéristiques des pièces polyvalentes
La gestion des pièces polyvalentes
Les pièces polyvalentes et l’organisation du commerce
Conclusion
Bibliographie
Index des lieux
Index des mots grecs
Index des auteurs anciens
Index des inscriptions
Origine des illustrations
FORTHCOMING: Dinamiche insediative nelle campagne dell'Italia tra Tarda Antichità e Alto Medioevo by Angelo Castrorao Barba. 160pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in Italian with English abstracts. 47 2018 Limina/Limites: Archaeologies, histories, islands and borders in the Mediterranean (365-1556) 6. ISBN 9781784918231. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume gathers a series of selected contributions about settlement patterns in the Italian countryside between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. It provides a critical overview of the most recent research carried out on late antique and early medieval Italy (Friuli Venezia Giulia, Liguria, Emilia Romagna, Tuscany, Lazio, Apulia and Calabria) and uses innovative interpretative frameworks to gain a better understanding of rural settlement dynamics.

About the Editor
ANGELO CASTRORAO BARBA (Palermo, 1983) is currently a Fellow at the University of Palermo (Sicily, Italy). His principal fields of interest are Late Antique and Early Medieval Archaeology and the transformations of landscape and settlement patterns from Roman times to the Middle Ages in Mediterranean area. In 2013, he obtained a PhD in Medieval Archaeology (University of Siena) with a dissertation about the end of Roman villas in Italy between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (200-800 AD). In 2014, he received a post-graduate Master Diploma in GIS & Remote Sensing (Center for Geo Technologies / Siena). In 2014-2015 he was guest researcher at VU University Amsterdam and a postdoc fellow at the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome (KNIR). Currently, he is a researcher on the project “Harvesting Memories” which aims to study ecology and archaeology of rural landscapes in Sicani Mountains (C-W Sicily), and he is field director of the excavation of the long-term settlement of Contrada Castro (Corleone, Palermo).
NEW: Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 1 Italy: North-East, Adriatic, Ionian. Bronze Age: Impasto by Valentina Cannavò and Sara Tiziana Levi. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+142 pages; 25 figures, 16 tables and 16 colour plate section containing 167 illustrations. 427 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918590. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918606. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Atlas Of Ceramic Fabrics 1. Italy: North-East, Adriatic, Ionian. Bronze Age: Impasto presents and interprets the petrographic composition of Bronze Age Impasto pottery (23rd-10th centuries BCE) found in the eastern part of Italy. This is the first of a series of Atlases organised according to geographical areas, chronology and types of wares. In this book 935 samples from 63 sites are included, which comprise material obtained as a result of almost 30 years of interdisciplinary archaeological, technological and archaeometric research by the authors’ team. 73 petrographic fabrics (the potters’ ‘recipes’) are defined and presented, on their lithological character – a tool that can be used to compare the different components of the ceramic pastes and to check provenance of non-local pots.

The volume is organised in chapters focused on methodology, fabric description and distribution, followed by the archaeological implications and the database, with contributions by Daniele Brunelli and Andrea Di Renzoni. Illustrations and descriptions of the fabrics and a complete list of the samples are included in order to provide a rigorous and transparent presentation of the data. The archaeological implications are discussed within the topics such as technology, variability, standardisation, chronology, function, social organisation, circulation, style, typology and cultural identity. It is hoped that this work will be considered as another stepping-stone in demostrating that, in archaeology, technological variability is as important as morphological and stylistic distinctions.

About the Authors
VALENTINA CANNAVÓ’S research focuses on the archaeometric investigation of ancient pottery. She is a research fellow at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia where she obtained a PhD in archaeological science (2010). Valentina teaches pottery technology (Ferrara University) and applied geoarchaeology (Modena and Reggio Emilia University) to the graduate students. She is in charge of the database of prehistoric pottery and since 2009 she has been the director of the field laboratory of the excavation at San Vincenzo Stromboli (Aeolian Islands).

SARA T. LEVI’S research focuses on the ancient pottery through an integrated archaeological, technological and archaeometric approach, and on the Bronze Age of central Mediterranean. She obtained a PhD in archaeology at Sapienza University in Rome (1996). Her findings have been published in several scientific journals and books, including a volume on the Italo- Mycenaean pottery (2014). Since 2015 she has been teaching archaeology at Hunter College in New York, after spending eight years at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia as professor of archaeological methodology. Since 2009 she leads the interdisciplinary archaeological investigations at San Vincenzo Stromboli (Aeolian Islands) and at Cannatello (Agrigento). Both projects hold international field schools for students as well.
NEW: Cycladic Archaeology and Research: New Approaches and Discoveries edited by Erica Angliker and John Tully. 298pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 417 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918095. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918101. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Cycladic Archaeology and Research: New approaches and discoveries reflects the present exciting times in Cycladic archaeology. New excavations are bringing to light sanctuaries unmentioned by literary sources and inscriptions (e.g., Kythnos, Despotiko); new theoretical approaches to insularity and networks are radically changing our views of the Cyclades as geographic and cultural unit(s). Furthermore, the restoration and restudy of older sites (e.g., Delos, Paros, Naxos) are challenging old truths, updating chronologies and contexts throughout the Mediterranean and beyond. This volume is intended to share these recent developments with a broader, international audience. The essays have been carefully selected as representing some of the most important recent work and include significant previously-unpublished material. Individually, they cover archaeological sites and materials from across the Cycladic islands, and illustrate the diversity of the islands’ material culture across the Geometric, Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman, and Late Antique periods. Together, they share common themes such as the importance of connectivity, and the role of each island’s individual landscape and its resources in shaping human activity. The work they represent attests the ongoing appeal of the islands and of the islanders in the collective imagination, and demonstrates the scope for still further innovative work in the years ahead.

About the Editors
ERICA ANGLIKER is a PhD student at the University of Zurich, where she is preparing the publication of her monograph on the cults and sanctuaries of the Cycladic islands. She has published on the culture and religion of the Cyclades and is a member of the scientific team at the excavations of the sanctuary of Despotiko, where she has been digging since 2012. Her research focuses on Greek cults and religions in the public and private sphere, from the Geometric to the Hellenistic era. Her special interests include cults practised at natural sites or involving natural elements, as well as topics in island studies, such as insularity, socioeconomic networks, and maritime travel logs.

JOHN TULLY studied Greats at the University of Oxford before writing his doctoral dissertation on the Hellenistic Cyclades at Harvard and Princeton. He is now a principal at Delivery Associates, where he helps governments improve the lives of citizens.
NEW: Estudios para la configuración de las facies cerámicas altoimperiales en el Sur de la Península Ibérica edited by P. Ruiz Montes, Ma. V. Peinado Espinosa and Ma. I. Fernández García. Paperback; 210x297mm; ii+284 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (68 colour plates). Spanish text throughout. 403 2018 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 11. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918118. £39.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918125. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £39.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Estudios para la configuración de las facies cerámicas altoimperiales en el Sur de la Península Ibérica explores economy and trade in the south of the Iberian peninsula during the High Roman Empire. Different methodologies, techniques and approaches to archaeological research are applied in the analysis and study of ceramic contexts in several marketplaces or consumption centres in the area. Special attention is given to ceramic facies predominantly characterised by the presence of fine pottery. In addition, the examination of local ceramics points towards a complexity whose interpretation has been biased until a few decades ago by the presence of wares imported from other Mediterranean regions as a result of the intensity of Roman trade. Furthermore, exploration beyond traditional analytical parameters highlights, for example, the relevance of the phenomenon of pottery vessel imitation.

About the Editors
DR PABLO RUIZ MONTES has a doctorate in History from the University of Granada and is a postdoctoral researcher linked to the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology at the University of Granada. His research focuses on the analysis of ceramic facies of Roman times in the Baetica province, and on the study of technology traditions and production processes, particularly in Red Slip wares, in the Western Roman world. Also, in past years, he has developed his research in Italy, at the University of Siena and in archaeological sites such as the Roman colony of Cosa (Ansedonia).

DR Mª VICTORIA PEINADO ESPINOSA has a doctorate in History from the University of Granada. She has worked as associate researcher for both the University of Granada and the University of Perugia. Her line of research has focused on the analysis of the material culture in Roman times, especially common ware pottery. Her works have contributed to better understand these ceramics both in the South of the Iberian Peninsula and in Central Italy. Currently, she combines teaching with archaeological research, and she is involved in several projects studying the Roman Baetica.

DR Mª ISABEL FERNÁNDEZ GARCÍA is Professor of Archeology at the Department of Prehistory and Archeology at the University of Granada. One of her main areas of expertise and focus of her research is the analysis of the production and marketing structures in pottery workshops from Roman times, with special emphasis in the Baetica province. She is a specialist in pottery productions in Hispanic terra sigillata.
NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually in October/November edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). ISBN 2059-4674-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora. the Editorial Board is headed by Professor John Bintliff (Edinburgh University, U.K. and Leiden University, The Netherlands).A full mission statement and information on the editorial and advisory board is available here.

A free 70+ page sampler is available to download in our Open Access section designed to act as an introduction and taster to the scope and style of this new journal. It includes one complete paper and two review articles as well as full contents listings for Volume 1.

SUBSCRIBE: click here to subscribe (2018: Volume 3, 1 issue).

SUBSCRIPTION RATES (all prices exclusive of VAT where applicable):

Private individuals:
Print: £60. Includes free digital copy.
Special price for digital-only subscribers: £25 (+VAT where applicable).

Institutions:
Print: £80
Print & Online access: £95 (+ VAT where applicable)
Online access only: £90 (+ VAT where applicable).

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An up-to-date contents listing for the journal is available online here: JGA contents 2016-2017

BACK-ISSUES

JGA Volume 1, 2016
JGA Volume 2, 2017

NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). ISBN 2399-1844-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

For the Hellenistic Period ceramics and other commodities of daily life represent probably the most neglected objects in archaeological research. Yet, the study of Hellenistic material culture has intensified during the last twenty years, with a focus clearly on what is by far the largest category of finds, pottery. Meanwhile research has gained momentum, but still there has unfortunately been no parallel development in the media landscape. Apart from monographs, the publication of conference proceedings, which usually follow several years after the event, have remained the principal method of disseminating research results. Still lacking is a publication appearing regularly and at short intervals, that focusses research on Hellenistic pottery and is easily accessible.

The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery – JHP – wants to close this gap.

JHP is scheduled to appear once a year, more often if necessary. It should provide a forum for all kinds of studies on Hellenistic pottery and everyday objects. Apart from professional articles, the journal will contain book reviews, short presentations of research projects (including dissertations) and general news. The Editorial Board is headed by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph.

SUBSCRIBE: click here to subscribe (2018: Volume 3, 1 issue).

SUBSCRIPTION RATES (all prices exclusive of VAT where applicable):

Print Subscriptions:
Private individuals: £30
Institutions: £50

eJournal available as a free PDF download in Archaeopress Open Access upon publication of the printed edition.

Standard shipping rates apply to all orders

An up-to-date contents listing for the journal is available online here: JHP contents 2016-2017


BACK-ISSUES (Available in print and as free-to-download PDF eJournals)

JHP Volume 1, 2016
JHP Volume 2, 2017

FORTHCOMING: The Mycenaean Cemetery at Clauss, Near Patras The people, their material remains and culture in context by Constantinos Paschalidis with contributions by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. Paperback; 205x290mm; 600pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (Print RRP £90.00). 436 2018. ISBN 9781784919191. Buy Now

This work comprises the study of the finds from the excavation of the University of Ioannina and the Archaeological Society at Athens in the Mycenaean cemetery of Clauss near Patras, carried out between 1988-1992 under the direction of Professor Thanassis Papadopoulos. During the excavation project, fifteen chamber tombs were located and researched in detail, to be added to those already known from the pre-war excavations by Nikolaos Kyparissis.

The presentation of the topic expands into seven thematic chapters, proceeding from the whole to the parts – and then returning to the whole. Thus, one progresses from the general review of the cemetery space and the sites, to the analytical description of the excavation, to remarks on the architecture, to the study of the finds, to the analysis of the burial customs and, finally, to the narration of the overall history of the cemetery according to chronological period and generation of its people. The last chapter is an addendum including a brief presentation of the anthropological analysis of the skeletal material, composed by Drs Photini J.P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski.

The Mycenaean Cemetery at Clauss, Near Patras presents fragments of the life and death of some members of a local community that lived for almost four centuries at the western end of the Mycenaean world.

About the Author
Constantinos Paschalidis was born in Athens in 1973. He studied History at the Ionian University, Corfu, and Archaeology at the University of Ioannina, where he successfully composed his doctoral thesis on the Mycenaean cemetery at Clauss, near Patras.

Since 1992 he has participated and worked for several archaeological projects (excavations, surveys and study-seasons) in Crete, Keos, Kythnos, Achaea, Argolid, Kefalonia, Ithaca, Corfu, Chalkidiki in Greece, as well as at the sites of Ghor as Safi and Tell Kafrein in Jordan. He has been Curator of Antiquities at the Department of Prehistoric, Egyptian, Cypriot and Oriental Collections of the National Archaeological Museum at Athens, and since 2012 he has been Secretary at the Central Archaeological Council of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Prologue by Professor Thanassis Papadopoulos; Preface – Acknowledgements; Introduction – The Methodology of Research; Chapter 1. The Mycenaean period in Achaea; Chapter 2. Description of tombs; Chapter 3. The setting and architecture of the tombs; Chapter 4. Catalogue of the finds from the cemetery; Chapter 5. The finds from the cemetery—analysis ; Chapter 6. Funerary customs in the cemetery; Chapter 7. The people and society of Clauss—overview and history of the cemetery ; Chapter 8. Bioarchaeological approach to the human remains from Clauss; Appendix. Tables of data; List of Figures; List of Tables; General Abbreviations ; Bibliography
From the Archaeological Record to Virtual Reconstruction The Application of Information Technologies at an Iron Age Fortified Settlement (San Chuis Hillfort, Allande, Asturias, Spain) by Juana Molina Salido. x+190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (126 colour plates). 425 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918750. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918767. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From the Archaeological Record to Virtual Reconstruction describes the use of New Information Technologies (IT) for the analyses and interpretation of archaeological record of the San Chuis Hillfort (San Martín de Beduledo, Allande, Asturias, Spain). The data gathered during the eight excavation campaigns conducted by Francisco Jordá Cerdá in the sixties and eighties of the 20th century was mechanised and digitalised. Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) of the hillfort was performed, followed by a creation of spatial analysis through the establishment of relations between the elements of the archaeological record. At the end, having studied and investigated the site’s urban evolution throughout its occupation period (890 cal. BP – 530 cal. AD), a virtual reconstruction of the hillfort in its different settlement phases, presenting various evolution scenarios is presented.

In the process a work methodology and a set of computer applications adapted for each step of this research have been established, such as the system for the insertion of records in a database, for planimetry drawings, hillfort virtualisation, and others.

About the Author Juana Molina Salido obtained a PhD in prehistory and archaeology. She has a long experience as an archaeologist, specialising in the application of New Information Technologies in the development of archaeological work, both in the field and in the cabinet. In addition, she is a technical specialist in heritage virtualisation. She is currently collaborating on several research projects at the UNED, the Middle Palaeolithic site of Jarama VI and on the hillfort that is the subject of this book.
Special Place, Interesting Times: The island of Palagruža and transitional periods in Adriatic prehistory by Stašo Forenbaher with contributions by Zlatko Perhoč and Robert H. Tykot. x+194 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 colour plates). 421 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918491. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918507. Book contents pageDownload

While one might say that the prehistory of the Adriatic was always in transition, the rhythm of change was not always the same. On several occasions, a series of changes over a relatively short time period resulted in dramatic transformations. Three crucial episodes of change marked the later Adriatic prehistory. The first one, which took place around year 6000 BC, was a transformation of subsistence strategy, transition from hunting and gathering to farming. The second one was a social transformation that played out in the third millennium BC, when for the first time the power of individuals was clearly expressed by material culture. The third episode, inclusion into the classic Mediterranean civilization, coincided with the end of prehistory in the Adriatic region.

During all of those episodes, travel and connectivity with distant lands played an exceptionally important role, and certain places gained particular importance due to their unique geographic location. Palagruža is among the most prominent such places, its importance being out of all proportion to its physical size. Adriatic prehistory cannot be told without mentioning Palagruža, and prehistory of Palagruža cannot be understood without knowing Adriatic prehistory. Due to its strategic position in the very center of the Adriatic Sea, due to the mystery born of distance and isolation, due to its wild and spectacular landscape, Palagruža indeed is a special place. A reflection of its specialty is an unexpected abundance of high-grade archaeological evidence, dating precisely from the three aforementioned periods marked by radical change.

About the Author
STAŠO FORENBAHER is Senior Research Advisor at the Institute for Anthropological Research in Zagreb, Croatia. He studied archaeology at the University of Zagreb (Croatia), and received his PhD from the Southern Methodist University in Dallas (TX). His research interests cover Mediterranean Prehistory with a focus on the Adriatic, and include transition to farming, formation of early elites, archaeology of caves, and lithic analysis. He has excavated at many prehistoric stratified cave sites in the eastern Adriatic, including Pupićina Cave in Istria, Vaganačka Cave in Velebit Mountain, Grapčeva Cave on the island of Hvar, and Nakovana Cave on Pelješac Peninsula. His current fieldwork is focussed on the excavation of Vela Cave on the island of Korčula.
Gifts, Goods and Money: Comparing currency and circulation systems in past societies edited by Dirk Brandherm, Elon Heymans and Daniela Hofmann. vi+228 pages; 73 figures (30 colour plates). 416 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918354. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918361. Book contents pageDownload

The papers gathered in this volume explore the economic and social roles of exchange systems in past societies from a variety of different perspectives. Based on a broad range of individual case studies, the authors tackle problems surrounding the identification of (pre-monetary) currencies in the archaeological record. These concern the part played by weight measurement systems in their development, the changing role of objects as they shift between different spheres of exchange, e.g. from gifts to commodities, as well as wider issues regarding the role of exchange networks as agents of social and economic change. Among the specific questions the papers address is what happens when new objects of value are introduced into a system, or when existing objects go out of use, as well as how exchange systems react to events such as crises or the emergence of new polities and social constellations. One theme that unites most of the papers is the tension between what is introduced from the outside and changes that are driven by social transformations within a given group.

About the Editors
DIRK BRANDHERM studied Archaeology, Classics and Social Anthropology at the universities of Münster, Edinburgh and Freiburg. Most of his work has been in European Bronze and Iron Age archaeology, with one focus on metalwork production and depositional practices. He currently holds a position of Lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

ELON HEYMANS studied archaeology at the University of Amsterdam and at Tel Aviv University. He completed his PhD in Tel Aviv on the early history of money in the eastern Mediterranean Iron Age, and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Utrecht University. His focus lies on the archaeology of Greece and the southern Levant, and he is particularly interested in the social, political and historical context of early money use.

DANIELA HOFMANN has obtained her PhD from Cardiff University and is currently Junior Professor at Hamburg University, Germany. She has published extensively on funerary archaeology, as well as the figurines and domestic architecture of the central European Neolithic, but she is also interested in instances of structured deposition and in spheres of exchange.
Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los siglos XVIII al XX edited by Sergio España-Chamorro, Rebeca Arranz Santos, Alberto Romero Molero. xii+246 pages; illustrated throughout in color and black & white (71 colour plates). 50 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918637. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918644. Book contents pageDownload

The History of archaeological research has only recently become a research topic of interest within Spain. A congress, Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX, was held at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2016 designed to bring this topic to the fore. Eleven papers are presented in this proceedings volume. They address several aspects from different perspectives that collectively enrich the historiography of Spanish archaeological research.

La Historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas es un campo de estudio muy reciente en el caso español. No obstante, las últimas décadas han sido muy fructíferas en esta línea de investigación. Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX es un volumen que recoge ese testigo con once trabajos originales que traen a la primera línea la historiografía de la Arqueología española. Estos trabajos, fruto de un congreso homónimo realizado en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid en 2016, abordan diferentes temas y perspectivas que abarcan importantes aspectos de la temática tratada con una variedad geográfica que atiende la diversidad y riqueza de la historiografía arqueológica española.

EDITORES
SERGIO ESPAÑA-CHAMORRO es doctor en Estudios del Mundo Antiguo por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Actualmente es investigador posdoctoral en la Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (CSIC) y profesor adjunto en la Universidad Isabel I. Sus líneas de investigación versan sobre Arqueología del Paisaje centrándose en la Bética y en Italia, además de su participación en proyectos de investigación sobre el espacio doméstico en Pompeya y la escultura romana en Cartago. Ha realizado estancias de investigación en el Departamento de Arqueología de la University of Southampton, en el centro CIL de la Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, en la Università degli Studi di Bari ‘Aldo Moro’ y en el Musei dei Fori Imperiali-Mercati di Traiano (Roma).

Rebeca Arranz Santos es graduada en Historia del Arte por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, y posee un máster en Arqueología del Mediterráneo en la Antigüedad clásica por la misma universidad. Compagina su doctorando en Historia y Arqueología con su colaboración como profesora en el Centro de Estudios Artísticos Elba, donde imparte cursos de Arqueología de Grecia, Arqueología de Roma y Arte de Mesopotamia y del Mediterráneo Oriental. Es miembro del grupo de trabajo del Proyecto I+D+I de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando. Además, ha realizado una estancia de doctorado en Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma.

Alberto Romero Molero es doctor en Prehistoria, Arqueología y Patrimonio por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Actualmente es director del Grado en Historia y Geografía de la Universidad Isabel I. Ha formado parte de numerosos proyectos de investigación, tanto nacionales como en el extranjero, lo que le ha permitido asistir y organizar numerosos seminarios, congresos, cursos y eventos de difusión científica. Sus líneas de investigación se centran en la arquitectura romana, el estudio de las técnicas constructivas, el análisis arqueológico de los espacios domésticos y la historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas. Ha desarrollado trabajos de campo, tanto de excavación como de documentación, en Carteia (San Roque, Cádiz), Baelo Claudia (Tarifa, Cádiz), Banasa (Marruecos), Veio y Pompeya (Italia).
SOMA 2015: Time, Space and People Proceedings of the 19th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology edited by Murat Arslan. iv+190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (69 colour plates). 49 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918514. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918521. Book contents pageDownload

The 19th annual meeting of the Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology (SOMA) was held in Kemer/Antalya (Turkey) from the 12th to the 14th of November, 2015. As has been the case in the past, this symposium continues to provide an important opportunity for scholars and researchers to come together and discuss their academic studies in a friendly and supportive atmosphere. The proceedings of SOMA 2015 contain eighteen interdisciplinary articles on themes from underwater archaeology to history, archaeometry and art history, and chronologically, the subjects of these articles range from the Bronze Age to the 20th century.

About the Editor
Murat Arslan is the editor of SOMA 2015. He is professor of Ancient History at Akdeniz University in Antalya (Turkey). He is interested in Ancient Greek and Ancient History, especially the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and historiography. In addition to his monographs (Galatians, Mithradates VI Eupator, Classical and Hellenistic History of Byzantion), his translations and commentaries on periplus (Arrianus, Ps. Scylax), and Memnon of Heracleia Pontica, he is the current editor in chief of several international journals (Cedrus, MJH, Phaselis, Libri).
Cuando (no siempre) hablan las piedras Hacia una arqueología integral en España como recurso de futuro. EL caso de Andalucia. 594 pages; Spanish text.. 22 2018. ISBN 9788416725113. £19.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Desiderio Vaquerizo Gil, Catedra?tico de Arqueologi?a en la Universidad de Co?rdoba, docente vocacional hasta los huesos, con una excelente formacio?n acade?mica, y empen?ado al ma?ximo con el objetivo de que la arqueologi?a sea realmente una ciencia social, reflexiona en este libro, de forma apasionada, lu?cida, cri?tica, valiente y comprometida sobre la arqueologi?a de los u?ltimos treinta y cinco an?os en Espan?a, con una consideracio?n especial sobre Andaluci?a y especi?ficamente Co?rdoba, pero sin perder nunca el referente ma?s amplio de la disciplina y utilizando el a?rea de estudio como atalaya para mirar mucho ma?s alla?. El tema, extenso y complejo, abarca muchos a?mbitos y exige perspectivas muy diferentes, que van desde una o?ptica profesional e investigadora a otra divulgativa y de percepcio?n social, pasando por una legislativa y au?n poli?tica (con mayu?scula), otra patrimonial y econo?mica, la internacional del mundo globalizado en que vivimos y hasta una perspectiva autocri?tica, que preside todo el discurso. Desde ahi? pretende buscar salidas de futuro para la situacio?n delicada en que se encuentra la arqueologi?a en nuestro pai?s, despue?s de la crisis econo?mica iniciada en 2008 —que desarbolo? al sector de empresas de arqueologi?a, dejo? tocada a la Universidad y congelo? expectativas en los museos—, y que sigue abierta todavi?a, con muchas incertidumbres en el horizonte. En el panorama de la arqueologi?a espan?ola esta reflexio?n es singular; no contamos con demasiadas voces claras y cri?ticas que quieran comprometerse por escrito para dejar testimonio pu?blico de la historia reciente y la situacio?n actual; desborda sinceridad y buenas intenciones a partes iguales, y proporciona valiosos materiales con lo que seguir levantando una arqueologi?a del siglo XXI, que sera? inevitablemente una «arqueologi?a en construccio?n».
Archaeology and Neoliberalism by Pablo Aparicio Resco. 422 pages. 17 2017. ISBN 9788494436871. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book tries to question the influence of neoliberal politics in the practice of archaeology. Through a series of contributions from all over the world (although focusing in Spain) and covering a wide range of topics, authors will delve into the problems that arise, where do they come from and how to overcome them.

Click the blue 'Contents' button to download the table of contents and complete preface for free.
Agia Varvara-Almyras: An Iron Age Copper Smelting Site in Cyprus edited by Christina Peege in collaboration with Philippe Della Casa and Walter Fasnacht. xii+294 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (100 colour plates). 415 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918156. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918163. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Iron Age copper smelting site situated near the Cypriot village Agia Varvara is of particular importance among the ancient copper processing places in the Near East because it has revealed spatial as well as technological aspects of copper production in a hitherto rarely-seen depth of detail. Agia Varvara-Almyras: an Iron Age Copper Smelting Site in Cyprus presents the results of a comprehensive post-excavation analysis of the stratigraphy (part I), also of the geology, metallurgical materials (furnaces, tuyeres), finds (pottery, furnace lining, stone tools), as well as a synthesis of the copper smelting technology at Agia Varvara-Almyras (part II).

The excavation analysis not only focuses on pyrotechnical information from individual furnaces, but also provides a detailed study of the spatial organisation as well as of the living conditions on the smelting site. An elaborate reconstruction of the features in a 3D model allows the visualisation of formerly-dispersed loci of copper production. Based on this virtual rebuilding of the hillock named Almyras, it becomes clear that archaeometallurgy must be unchained, and the idea of an ‘operational chain’ must be replaced by a more multidimensional research strategy labelled as an ‘operational web’. The present volume aims to stimulate future excavations which pay attention to the reasons behind the exploitation of the riches of the island, as well as to the needs of the markets where the final product was very likely to have been appreciated as a strategic commodity, by power players operating on the island as well as by ordinary people in need of a repair to an everyday commodity which had broken.

About the Editors
CHRISTINA PEEGE graduated at the Department of Classical Archaeology at the University of Zurich. She started her academic career as a research assistant at the Chair of Ancient History in Zurich, and as a scientific collaborator at the Mint Cabinet in the City of Winterthur. After having participated in archaeological excavations conducted by cantonal archaeology services in Switzerland, she started as a trench supervisor under the auspices of Walter Fasnacht at the excavation of Agia Varvara-Almyras. She completed her doctoral studies with this comprehensive publication of the excavation results at the University of Zurich in January 2017.

PHILIPPE DELLA CASA graduated in Roman Provincial Archaeology before taking his PhD with a thesis on the Bronze Age necropolis of Velika Gruda, Montenegro in 1994. He then engaged in a series of large Adriatic and Alpine projects on settlement survey and excavation, landscape history, as well as social and economic archaeology including mining archaeology. Since 2002, he has held the Chair of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Zurich as a full professor.

WALTER FASNACHT graduated in primary and secondary teaching before the award of his master’s degree in Prehistoric Archaeology and Geology at the University of Zurich. He is the director of the Almyras Excavation Cyprus. He has been lecturer in archaeometallurgy at the Universities of Fribourg and Zurich, curator of archaeology at the Swiss National Museum, researcher at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research as well as a member of the Swiss School of Archaeology in Eretria, Greece. He founded the Swiss Association of Experimental Archaeology and is an active teacher and educator.
Les Néandertaliens du talon Technologie lithique et mobilité au Paléolithique moyen dans le Salento (Pouilles, Italie méridionale) by Enza E. Spinapolice. xii+224 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout with 14 plates in colour. French text.. 409 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918217. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918224. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Salento is a peninsula in Southern Italy, the heel of the Italian boot, characterised both by an abundance of Middle Palaeolithic sites and a scarcity of raw material suitable for knapping. The research question at the basis of this book concerns the managing of raw materials by Neanderthals, through both the procurement and use of the locally available raw materials and the exploitation of possibly more distant sources.

Le Salento est une péninsule du sud de l’Italie, le talon de la botte italienne, caractérisée à la fois par l’abondance des sites du Paléolithique moyen et par une pénurie des matières premières propres à la taille. La question de recherche à la base de ce livre concerne la gestion des matières premières par les Néandertaliens, à travers l’approvisionnement et l’utilisation des matières premières disponibles localement et l’exploitation éventuelle de sources plus éloignées.

About the Author ENZA E. SPINAPOLICE is a researcher at Sapienza University of Rome. She is a Palaeolithic archaeologist, broadly interested in what makes us human. Her main research focus is on the origins and spread of modern humans and the Neanderthal extinction. She is currently studying MSA lithic industries from North Africa, Ethiopia and Kenya and Mousterian/Uluzzian record from Italy. She is particularly interested in the interactions between culture and biological evolution, as well as in the cultural, social and demographic processes of prehistoric hunter-gatherers from both a synchronic and diachronic perspective.

ENZA E. SPINAPOLICE est chercheur à l’Université La Sapienza, Rome (Italie). Elle est une archéologue du paléolithique, intéressée à la question de «ce qui nous rend humains». Ses principaux intérêts de recherche portent sur les origines et la diffusion des humains modernes et sur l’extinction des Néandertaliens. Elle étudie actuellement les industries lithiques MSA d’Afrique du Nord, d’Éthiopie et du Kenya et la Transition Moustérien/ Uluzzien en Italie. Elle s’intéresse particulièrement aux interactions entre la culture et l’évolution biologique, ainsi qu’aux processus culturels, sociaux et démographiques des chasseurs-cueilleurs préhistoriques, d’un point de vue synchronique et diachronique.