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NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 3 2018 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Paperback; vi+526 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (107 colour plates). 3 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690316. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690323. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now


NEW: KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies Volume 1, 2018 Inaugural Issue edited by Nicholas J. Molinari (General Editor); Shawn Caza, Lloyd W.H. Taylor (Associate Editors). Paperback; 220x280mm; vi+152 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 plates in colour). 1 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690293. £35.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690309. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As the name indicates, KOINON is a journal that encourages contributions to the study of classical numismatics from a wide variety of perspectives. The journal will include papers concerning iconography, die studies, provenance research, forgery analysis, translations of excerpts from antiquarian works, specialized bibliographies, corpora of rare varieties and types, ethical questions on laws and collecting, book reviews, and more. The editorial advisory board is made up of members from all over the world, with a broad range of expertise covering virtually all the major categories of classical numismatics from archaic Greek coinage to late Medieval coinage.

Table of contents for the inaugural issue:
Why a New Journal in Classical Numismatics? An Editorial by Nicholas J. Molinari

GREEK NUMISMATICS
Sophocles’ Trachiniae and the Apotheosis of Herakles: The Importance of Acheloios and Some Numismatic Confirmations – by Nicholas J. Molinari
Provenance Lost and Found: Alfred Bourguignon – by John Voukelatos
A Philip III Tetradrachm Die Pair Recycled by Seleukos I – by Lloyd W.H. Taylor
Blundered Era Date on Coin of Arados, Civic Year 119 – by Martin Rowe

ROMAN NUMISMATICS
Sotto l’egida di Minerva: Echi monetali delle imprese britanniche da Cesare ai Severi – by Luigi Pedroni
A Doubted Variety of M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus Vindicated – by Jordan Montgomery and Richard Schaefer
Redating Nepotian’s Usurpation and the Coinage of Magnentius – by Shawn Caza
A previously unrecorded reverse for Constantine I – by Victor Clark

ORIENTAL NUMISMATICS
The Dating and the Sequence of the Persid Frataraka Revisited – by Wilhelm Müseler
The Kilwa Coins of Sultan al-Ḥasan ibn Sulaymān in their Historical Context – by N.J.C. Smith
An Introduction to Parthian Silver Fractions, The Little Anomalies of Arsacid Coinage – by Bob Langnas
An interesting denaro tornese of the Barons Revolt of 1459-1464 and some considerations regarding Nicola II di Monforte – by Andrei Bontas

A CATALOG OF NEW VARIETIES
NEW: To Die in Style! The Residential Lifestyle of Feasting and Dying in Iron Age Stamna, Greece by Gioulika-Olga Christakopoulou. Paperback; 175x245pp; ii+77 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 445 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919351. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919368. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £22.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Symposium in Stamna both as a concept and as a process involved the presence of prominent citizens of the social establishment, as testified by the large cauldrons, tripod jars and tripod vessels present. This study re-examines the cemeteries studied to date, isolating tombs with unique architecture or peculiar structures with individual features, in order to investigate the complex identity of the elite group ideologies.

The finding and studying of such a large number of PRG tombs (500 ca) presents a good representative example for discussing the perception of death, and how it was confronted through the mourning ritual. The data also presents an opportunity to examine the creation of individual and collective memory in a population that operated in this privileged location, redefining as such the cultural landscape of the Protogeometric era. The pre-existing theoretical framework, the methodology of the managing and displaying of grief and their correlation with already-studied and exalted geographical parallels, integrate Stamna into the cultural chain of populations ruled by an overall-systematic design of a particular cultural ideology.

About the Author
GIOULIKA-OLGA CHRISTAKOPOULOU was born in Patras in 1968 and holds a degree in History and Archaeology from the University of Ioannina, and a PhD in Archaeology from the National Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. For the past twenty-five years she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities in Achaia, Greece. She also worked as a Lecturer until 2014, teaching ‘Ancient Monumental Topography’ in the Department of Museology, Museography and Exhibition Planning, at the University of Applied Studies, Western Greece. She has dedicated special attention to the study of the Iron Age in Ancient Stamna, Aetolia, and her research and publications focus on the population movement, burial architecture and burial rituals of this period.
NEW: A Bestiary of Monsters in Greek Mythology by Spyros Syropoulos. Paperback; 148x210mm; viii+140 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 colour plates). (Print £19.99). 451 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919504. £19.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919511. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Greek myths abound in images of beauty and perfection: charming gods, attractive goddesses, and handsome heroes, all of them standards of physical and spiritual flawlessness. However, the ancient Greeks were not fond of absolutes. No god or hero is shown without blemishes in character and ethics, and some are even physically imperfect, like Hephaestus, who is ugly and lame. Another element that dominates Greek mythology is the idea of balance. Good and evil, light and darkness, hubris and punishment. What could not be missing from this world is the image of reversed beauty: monstrosity. The aim of this book is to explore the realm of the imaginary world of Greek mythology and present the reader with a categorization of monstrosity, referring to some of the most noted examples in each category.

About the Author
SPYROS SYROPOULOS is an Associate Professor of Ancient Greek Literature at the Dept of Mediterranean Studies of the University of the Aegean in Rhodes. He is the acting Vice-Rector of the University of the Aegean (2014-2018). Since 2006, he teaches Ancient Greek Theater at the Open University of Greece. He is the director of the Masters Course ‘Theater as a social and political institution during antiquity’ at the Department of Mediterranean Studies of the University of the Aegean. He is the founder and editor of the electronic journal ELECTRYONE (http://www.electryone.gr) and since 2017 he is the General Secretary of the Greek delegation at the European University Association.
NEW: Winifred Lamb: Aegean Prehistorian and Museum Curator by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 148x210mm; 340pp. (Print RRP £30.00). 448 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918798. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918804. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

Winifred Lamb was a pioneering archaeologist in Anatolia and the Aegean. She studied classics at Newnham College, Cambridge, and subsequently served in naval intelligence alongside J. D. Beazley during the final stages of the First World War. As war drew to a close, Sydney Cockerell, Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, invited Lamb to be the honorary keeper of Greek antiquities. Over the next 40 years she created a prehistoric gallery, marking the university’s contribution to excavations in the Aegean, and developed the museum’s holdings of classical bronzes and Athenian figure-decorated pottery. Lamb formed a parallel career excavating in the Aegean. She was admitted as a student of the British School at Athens and served as assistant director on the Mycenae excavations under Alan Wace and Carl Blegen. After further work at Sparta and on prehistoric mounds in Macedonia, Lamb identified and excavated a major Bronze Age site at Thermi on Lesbos. She conducted a brief excavation on Chios before directing a significant project at Kusura in Turkey. She was recruited for the Turkish language section of the BBC during the Second World War, and after the cessation of hostilities took an active part in the creation of the British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara. a.

About the Author
David Gill is Professor of Archaeological Heritage at the University of Suffolk and Visiting Research Fellow in the School of History at the University of East Anglia. He is a former Rome Scholar at the British School at Rome, and Sir James Knott Fellow at Newcastle University. He was responsible for the Greek and Roman collections at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, before moving to Swansea University where he was Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Introduction
Chapter 1 - The Lamb Family and Early Years
Chapter 2 - Cambridge and Classics
Chapter 3 - The Hope Vases and Naval Intelligence
Chapter 4 - The First Year in Athens (1920–21)
Chapter 5 - Prehistory and the Fitzwilliam Museum
Chapter 6 - Mycenae, Sparta and Macedonia
Chapter 7 - The Fitzwilliam Museum: Developing the Classical Collections
Chapter 8 - The Eastern Aegean: Lesbos and Chios
Chapter 9 - Anatolia and Kusura
Chapter 10 - The War Years
Chapter 11 - The British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara
Bibliography
Index
NEW: Oikèma ou pièce polyvalente: recherches sur une installation commerciale de l’Antiquité grecque by Pavlos Karvonis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 110pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. 60 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919399. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919405. Book contents pageDownload

This volume discusses the evolution of oikema, which is the most common type of commercial facility in ancient Greece. The study covers a large area including Continental Greece, the Aegean islands, the Ionian islands and the west coast of Asia Minor. The author, after a thorough analysis, proposes a new terminology for commercial and industrial facilities. The book also presents the architectural characteristics and the equipment of oikemata and discusses their location and relationship with other buildings. The ownership, use and maintenance of oikemata are also discussed. It is argued that oikemata provided merchants and craftsmen with a suitable working space and contributed to the gradual abandonment of houses as working places, especially in cities that developed in the Hellenistic period. Their characteristics corresponded perfectly well to the needs of Greek commerce.

PAVLOS KARVONIS studied archaeology in Athens from 1994 to 1998. In 2000, he finished his Masters degree at the University of Paris X-Nanterre and in 2004 he defended a thesis entitled “Lieux et locaux de vente dans la Grèce égéenne du IVe au Ier siècle av. J.-C.” at the same University. In 2006, he worked for the Archaeological Society at Athens, and since 2007 he has been working for the Academy of Athens in the Tabula Imperii Romani program. He has published two volumes on the Aegean islands and Attica, and has published several articles on commercial architecture. He is also preparing the publications of two commercial buildings located on the western shore of the island and participates in a research programme on stone and its use on Delos.

Table of Contents
Avant-propos
English Summary
Nomenclature
Le vocabulaire antique des installations commerciales
Les critères d’identification des pièces polyvalentes
L’apparition de la pièce polyvalente
Les activités attestées dans les pièces polyvalentes
Les caractéristiques des pièces polyvalentes
La gestion des pièces polyvalentes
Les pièces polyvalentes et l’organisation du commerce
Conclusion
Bibliographie
Index des lieux
Index des mots grecs
Index des auteurs anciens
Index des inscriptions
Origine des illustrations
FORTHCOMING: Greek Art in Motion Studies in honour of Sir John Boardman on the occasion of his 90th Birthday edited by Rui Morais, Delfim Leão, Diana Pérez with Daniela Ferreira. Paperback; iv+528pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (230 colour plates). (Print RRP £75.00). 485 2018. ISBN 9781789690231. Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication on Greek Art gathers a large number of studies presented at the International Congress ‘Greek Art in Motion’. Held in honour of Sir John Boardman’s 90th birthday, the congress took place at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, 3-5 May, 2017.

The volume first presents eight contributions by the keynote speakers who, as friends and students of Sir John, present a debate and a problematisation of Greek Art from the archaeological and historical point of view.

Thereafter, 45 papers are divided into the different themes considered during the congress, all of which have greatly benefited from Sir John's researches throughout his long and distinguished academic career: Sculpture, Architecture, Terracotta and Metal, Greek Pottery, Coins, Greek History and Archaeology, Greeks Overseas, Reception and Collecting, Art and Myth.

About the Editors
RUI MORAIS was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in History, variant of Archaeology from the University of Coimbra. He has a Masters in Urban Archaeology, PhD in Archaeology, Technology and Materials from University of Minho. He was Professor at Minho University and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Among his research, he has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH). He was a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for antiques. He is a member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project.

DELFIM LEÃO is a Professor at the Institute of Classical Studies and a researcher at the Center for Classical and Humanistic Studies, University of Coimbra. His main areas of interest are ancient history, law and political theory of the Greeks, theatrical pragmatics, and the ancient novel. He also has a strong interest in digital humanities. Among his main recent works are D. F. Leão and P. J. Rhodes, ‘The Laws of Solon. A new Edition, with Introduction, Translation and Commentary’ (London, I. B. Tauris, 2015), and a second revised edition in 2016; D. F. Leão and G. Thür (Hrsg.) ‘Symposion 2015. Vorträge zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte’ (Wien, Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2016). Along with Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta, he is the editor of Brill’s ‘Plutarch Studies’.

DIANA RODRÍGUEZ PÉREZ is a Junior Research Fellow at Mougins Museum in Classical Art and Material Culture at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and was previously the Research Assistant for the Beazley Archive Pottery Database at the Classical Art Research Centre. Before moving to Oxford, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Edinburgh (FECYT). She received a PhD (Doctor Europaea) from the University of León, Spain (The Snake in the Ancient Greek World: Myth, Rite and Image), an MPhil in History of Art from the University of León, and an MPhil in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. From 2010 to 2011 she worked as a translator at the European Parliament in Luxemburg, and was a DAAD Fellow at the Institut für klassische Archäologie of the University of Heidelberg from 2008 to 2009. In the summer of 2017 she was Tytus Scholar at the Department of Classical Studies of the University of Cincinnati (US).

DANIELA FERREIRA is currently a PhD student at the Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archeology of Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, and a researcher at UI&D CITCEM - Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory», Portugal. She is also a recipient of a FCT (Portuguese national funding agency for science, research and technology) grant since 2015. Daniela holds a Master’s degree in Archaeology from the University of Oporto (Portugal), with a focus
FORTHCOMING: Popular Religion and Ritual in prehistoric and ancient Greece and the eastern Mediterranean edited by Giorgos Vavouranakis, Konstantinos Kopanias and Chrysanthos Kanellopoulos. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+170 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (30 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 481 2018. ISBN 9781789690453. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume features a group of select peer-reviewed papers by an international group of authors, both younger and senior academics and researchers. It has its origins in a conference held at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, which aimed to bring up the frequently-neglected popular cult and other ritual practices in prehistoric and ancient Greece and the eastern Mediterranean. The topics covered by the chapters of the volume include the interplay between elite and popular ritual at cemeteries and peak sanctuaries just before and right after the establishment of the first palaces in Minoan Crete; the use of conical cups in Minoan ritual; the wide sharing of religious and other metaphysical beliefs as expressed in the wall-paintings of Akrotiri on the island of Thera; the significance of open-air sanctuaries, figurines and other informal cult and ritual paraphernalia in the Aegean, Cyprus and the Levant from the late bronze age to the archaic period; the role of figurines and caves in popular cult in the classical period; the practice of cursing in ancient Athens; and the popular element of sports games in ancient Greece.

About the Editors GIORGOS VAVOURANAKIS is Assistant Professor in Prehistoric Aegean: Theoretical Archaeology at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied at the same university and did his MA and PhD at the University of Sheffield. He has worked as a contract archaeologist for the Hellenic Ministry of Culture, as a post-doctoral researcher at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and as adjunct faculty at the Universities of Crete and the Peloponnese, and the Hellenic Open University. His research interests include archaeological theory, especially landscape archaeology and funerary archaeology, but also the history of archaeological research. He has directed field projects in Cyprus and Crete and is currently the deputy director of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens excavation at Marathon.

KONSTANTINOS KOPANIAS is Assistant Professor of Ancient Civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied at the same university and also at the Paris-Lodron University of Salzburg and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. He has worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Athens, as adjunct faculty at the University of Crete and as Allgemeiner Referent at the German Archaeological Institute in Athens. Since 2011 he has been the director of the University of Athens excavaton in Tell Nader and Tell Baqrta in the Kurdistan Region in Iraq.

CHRYSANTHOS KANELLOPOULOS is an archaeologist specializing in classical architecture. He is Assistant Professor at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He was employed for a number of years as a historical architect at the American Center of Oriental Research in Amman, Jordan, where he worked on the buildings of both Amman and Petra. His PhD thesis treated the classical and Hellenistic phases of ancient Karthaia on the island of Kea. He is the author of Amman: The Great Temple (Amman 1996) and the Late Roman Temenos Wall at Epidauros (Athens 1999), co-author of the Petra Church (Amman 2001), The Thymele at Epidauros (Fargo 2017) and The North Ridge in Petra (Amman 2018). During recent years, Dr Kanellopoulos’ work has focussed on the architecture of the Library of Hadrian in Athens and of the temple of Zeus Basileus in Levadeia.
FORTHCOMING: The Mycenaean Cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras People, material remains and culture in context by Constantinos Paschalidis with contributions by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. Paperback; 205x290mm; xxiv+510 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (277 plates in colour). (Print RRP £90.00). 436 2018. ISBN 9781784919191. Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean Cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras: People, material remains and culture in context comprises the study of the finds from the excavation of the Mycenaean cemetery of Clauss near Patras, carried out by the University of Ioannina and the Archaeological Society at Athens from 1988 to 1992, under the direction of Professor Thanassis Papadopoulos. In the course of the excavation project, fifteen chambered tombs were located and researched in detail, to be added to those already known from the pre-war excavations by Nikolaos Kyparissis. The presentation of the topic expands into seven thematic chapters: from a general review of the cemetery space and the sites, to analytical description of the excavation, remarks on the architecture, study of the finds, analysis of the burial customs and finally, narration of the overall history of the cemetery according to chronological period and generation of its occupants. The eighth and last chapter is an addendum including a brief presentation of the anthropological analysis of the skeletal material by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. The Mycenaean cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras presents fragments of the life and death of some members of a local community that existed for almost four centuries at the western end of the Mycenaean world.

About the Author
CONSTANTINOS PASCHALIDIS was born in Athens in 1973. He studied History at the Ionian University, Corfu, and Archaeology at the University of Ioannina, where he successfully composed his doctoral thesis on the Mycenaean cemetery at Clauss, near Patras. Starting in 1992 he has participated in and worked for several archaeological projects (excavations, surveys and study-seasons) in Crete, Keos, Kythnos, Achaea, Argolid, Kefalonia, Ithaca, Corfu, Chalkidiki in Greece, as well as at the sites of Ghor as Safi and Tell Kafrein in Jordan. Since 2002 he is a Curator of Antiquities at the Department of Prehistoric, Egyptian, Cypriot and Near Eastern Collections of the National Archaeological Museum at Athens, and from 2012 he holds the position of Secretary at the Central Archaeological Council of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports. Paschalidis.
Handel in Krisenzeiten: Ägyptisch-mykenische Handelsbeziehungen in der Ramessidenzeit by Birgit Schiller. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+208 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. German text with English summary. (RRP £35.00). 434 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918675. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918682. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides an overview of the sites of Mycenaean pottery finds in Egypt and Nubia. Data from thirty-six sites in Egypt and twelve sites in Nubia are presented. The context of the vessels and sherds dates from the reign of Akhenaten (18th Dynasty) to that of Ramesses VI (20th Dynasty). The imported vessels were found in the capital cities as well as in fortresses, other cities and tombs. Stirrup jars and flasks came to light frequently.

Copies of Mycenaean stirrup jars made from clay, faience and stone were also found. The oldest sherd of an imitation vessel was found in Amarna; hence, the Mycenaean vessel shape (stirrup jar prevailing) was copied outside of Mycenaean Greece in the 18th Dynasty and filled with local liquids—possibly oil—and traded with Egypt. Egyptians not only imported vessels from the Levant but also produced imitation vessels themselves. Apparently, these vessels circulated only within Egypt.

Chemical analyses of sherds from different sites reveal that the vessels found in 18th Dynasty contexts were made on the Mycenaean mainland. During the Ramesside period (19th–20th Dynasty) trading contacts with Mycenaean Greece shifted to Cyprus, where high quality Mycenaean pottery was produced.

About the Author
Birgit Schiller studied Egyptology and Classical Archaeology (prioritising Bronze Age Archaeology) at the Humboldt University of Berlin. She completed her MA in Egyptology and wrote her PhD thesis in Classical Archaeology. Her defence of the thesis was made in 2012.

German Description: Dieses Buch gibt eine Übersicht über die in Ägypten und Nubien gefundene mykenische Keramik. An 36 Orten in Ägypten und an 12 verschiedenen Stellen in Nubien kam sie ans Tageslicht. Zeitlich reichen die Funde von der Regierungszeit Echnatons (18. Dynastie) bis zu Ramses VI. (20. Dynastie). Die Gefäße wurden im Wohnbereich, mithin bei den Lebenden, wie auch als Grabbeigabe, für das Leben im Jenseits verwendet. Das militärische Personal wurde ebenfalls mit mykenischen Produkten, vermutlich Öl, versorgt.

Eine Auflistung der Nachahmungen mykenischer Bügelkannen, die aus Ton, Fayence und Stein (Kalzit) gefertigt wurden, findet sich ebenfalls hier. Die älteste Nachahmung (sog. Simple Style-Keramik) stammt aus Amarna, so dass deren Import etwa gleichzeitig mit dem Import der Ware aus dem mykenischen Gebiet beginnt. So sind sie teils aus der Levante kommend mit lokaler Flüssigkeit – vermutlich Öl – nach Ägypten verhandelt worden. Auch die Ägypter haben ihrerseits die Bügelkanne nachgemacht, wobei gerade die Tongefäße wohl eher für den heimischen Markt gedacht waren.

Chemische Analysen des Tons haben ergeben, dass die Keramik, die in Kontexten der 18. Dynastie gefunden wurde, aus dem mykenischen Kernland, der Argolis, stammt. Während der Ramessidenzeit (19.-20. Dynastie) verlagerte sich der Handel nach Zypern, wo hochwertige mykenische Keramik hergestellt wurde.

Die Autorin studierte an der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Ägyptologie und Klassische Archäologie, wo sie den Schwerpunkt auf die Ägäische Bronzezeit legte. Sie schloss das Studium mit dem Magister in Ägyptologie ab und schriebt ihre Doktorarbeit in der Klassischen Archäologie zur mykenischen Keramik in Ägypten. Die Arbeit wurde 2012 verteidigt.
The Luwians of Western Anatolia Their Neighbours and Predecessors by Fred Woudhuizen. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+162 pages; 35 illustrations, 11 tables (3 colour plates). 405 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918279. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918286. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In scholarly literature, there is much attention given to the Hittites and the Mycenaean Greeks, but the Luwians of Western Anatolia are notoriously neglected. Therefore, a study focussing on the latter is desirable. In this book, the presently available information on the western Luwians is assembled. This entails, primarily, the epigraphic evidence in the form of Luwian hieroglyphic inscriptions from the region and the historical information which can be deduced from it, as well as historical Hittite sources. As a prerequisite for the reconstruction of the history of the western Luwians during the Middle and Late Bronze Ages, the thorny question of the geography of their habitat needs to be tackled. This can now be done in an adequate manner owing to the most recent discoveries. Apart from Luwian hieroglyphic, the Luwians of Western Anatolia also used cuneiform script. Based on the linguistic data from both categories of evidence, a sketch of their language is presented. It must be realized, though, that not all inhabitants of Western Anatolia were speakers of the Luwian language. Thus, it will be argued that their northern neighbours in the Troad spoke a different language, of Thraco-Phrygian type. Finally, the Luwians were not autochthonous in the region, but preceded by speakers of a different Indo-European tongue, most adequately defined as Old Indo-European in Hans Krahe’s terms.

About the Author
FRED WOUDHUIZEN, born in 1959, graduated in Mediterranean Pre- and Protohistory at the University of Amsterdam (1985). He earned his PhD in 2006 at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, with a dissertation on ‘The Ethnicity of the Sea Peoples’. As an expert Luwologist, he is well-known for his books and articles on the Luwian dialects of Anatolia and the wider Aegean. Among his books, mention should be made of ‘Luwian Hieroglyphic Monumental Rock and Stone Inscriptions from the Hittite Empire Period’ (2004) and ‘Selected Luwian Hieroglyphic Texts: The Extended Version’ (2011).

Table of Contents
Preface; 1. The Homeland of the Luwians; 2. Geography of Western Anatolia; 3. Origin of the Luwian Hieroglyphic Script; 4. Luwian Hieroglyphic Evidence on the Great Kingdom of Assuwa; 5. Western Anatolia under Hittite Rule; 6. Western Anatolia in the Final Stage of the Bronze Age; 7. Amenhotep III: Historical Background to his Aegean Policy; 8. The Arzawan Language; 9. The Language of the Trojans; 10. Evidence for an Old Indo-European Substrate in Western Anatolia; Bibliography
NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually in October/November edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). ISBN 2059-4674-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora. the Editorial Board is headed by Professor John Bintliff (Edinburgh University, U.K. and Leiden University, The Netherlands).A full mission statement and information on the editorial and advisory board is available here.

A free 70+ page sampler is available to download in our Open Access section designed to act as an introduction and taster to the scope and style of this new journal. It includes one complete paper and two review articles as well as full contents listings for Volume 1.

SUBSCRIBE: click here to subscribe (2018: Volume 3, 1 issue).

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An up-to-date contents listing for the journal is available online here: JGA contents 2016-2017

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JGA Volume 1, 2016
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NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). ISBN 2399-1844-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

For the Hellenistic Period ceramics and other commodities of daily life represent probably the most neglected objects in archaeological research. Yet, the study of Hellenistic material culture has intensified during the last twenty years, with a focus clearly on what is by far the largest category of finds, pottery. Meanwhile research has gained momentum, but still there has unfortunately been no parallel development in the media landscape. Apart from monographs, the publication of conference proceedings, which usually follow several years after the event, have remained the principal method of disseminating research results. Still lacking is a publication appearing regularly and at short intervals, that focusses research on Hellenistic pottery and is easily accessible.

The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery – JHP – wants to close this gap.

JHP is scheduled to appear once a year, more often if necessary. It should provide a forum for all kinds of studies on Hellenistic pottery and everyday objects. Apart from professional articles, the journal will contain book reviews, short presentations of research projects (including dissertations) and general news. The Editorial Board is headed by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph.

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eJournal available as a free PDF download in Archaeopress Open Access upon publication of the printed edition.

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An up-to-date contents listing for the journal is available online here: JHP contents 2016-2017


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JHP Volume 1, 2016
JHP Volume 2, 2017

Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems Meanings and interpretations by Idit Sagiv. Paperback; 175x245mm; vi+198 pages; 98 illustrations (51 plates in colour). (Print RRP £35.00). 439 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918699. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918705. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Whereas animals are a frequent depiction on gemstones within the Greek and Roman periods, and play a key role in symbolic representations on these engraved gems, they have generally been overlooked with little in the way of focussed academic study.

In the present research, a large group of Greek and Roman gems (intaglios) bearing depictions of animals was selected. The gems are presented through a detailed study of the themes described in an attempt to form a comprehensive approach to the depictions of animals and their significance on Greek and Roman gems. The work examines the associations between animal depictions and the type of gemstone and its believed qualities. The study also discusses the changes in representation of animals on gems compared to other, larger media, and questions the significance of these changes. It is concluded here that as far as animal motifs are concerned, the gems could be accorded with a deeper symbolism, such as good luck, abundance and fertility, health, success, and victory. All these motifs are perceived as capable of weakening hostile forces. The animals engraved can also symbolise nature's abundance and fertility, especially when represented along with their offspring, pasturing and grazing, or accompanied by such fertility symbols as cornucopia, ears of corn, and wine goblets. Other animals are related to certain gods, and even comprise their attributes, and thus it was believed that the owner of an engraved gem was accorded divine protection.

About the Author
Dr. Idit Sagiv is a researcher of Classical Art. She completed her MA and PhD studies at Tel Aviv University. Her research and publications focus on Greek and Roman engraved gems. Since 2016, she is an academic member of the History of Art Department, Tel-Aviv University, where she teaches courses on Classical Art.
Coins in Rhodes From the monetary reform of Anastasius I until the Ottoman conquest (498 - 1522) by Anna-Maria Kasdagli. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+444 pages; 139 figures, 154 plates (7 colour pages). 437 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918415. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918422. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Coins in Rhodes: From the monetary reform of Anastasius I until the Ottoman conquest (498 – 1522) presents the Byzantine and medieval coins collected by Greek archaeologists in Rhodes over a period of more than sixty years. It includes lists of excavated land plots, stray finds, an illustrated catalogue of all the Byzantine and local coins up to 1309, and a representative sample of the Hospitaller petty coins as well as all the Western coins found. Hoard evidence helps sort various emissions and their dates between c. 1320 – c. 1420.

After a chapter introducing the reader to the archaeology of Rhodes, the nature of the material and the way it has been handled, the coins are set against the reconsidered backdrop of local history from 498 to 1522, tracing fluctuations in circulation and attempting to explore their significance. Particular care is taken over the transitional 13th century, when fragmentation of power in the region has made the scanty documentary evidence very hard to assess.

Different approaches have been applied, depending on the available evidence integral to the material and that available from other sources. The archaeology of Rhodes across ten centuries presents all the difficulties of disturbed stratigraphy and recycling of structures expected of an intensively used site. The work aspires to promote a way of dealing with quantities of finds from large-scale rescue excavation that will help other scholars date contexts more accurately and review or compare their own data from this or other sites.

About the Author
ANNA-MARIA KASDAGLI BA (University of Birmingham, UK); MA, PhD (University of Athens, Greece) is an archaeologist, employed by the Greek Ministry of Culture in Rhodes since 1986. She is involved in restoration projects, rescue excavation, heritage protection and heritage awareness promotion. She has published papers on Byzantine and Hospitaller coins, epigraphics, medieval monuments of Rhodes and a volume on Hospitaller architectural sculpture.
Settlement and Land Use on the Periphery: The Bouros-Kastri Peninsula, Southern Euboia by Jere M. Wickens, Susan I. Rotroff, Tracey Cullen, Lauren E. Talalay, Catherine Perlès, and Floyd W. McCoy. 274pp; illustrated throughout in black & white. 410 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918194. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918200. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Bouros-Kastri peninsula at the south-eastern tip of the Greek island of Euboia has previously been overlooked in the archaeological literature. This survey by the Southern Euboea Exploration Project, conducted under the aegis of the Canadian Institute in Greece, now provides a wealth of intriguing information about fluctuations in long-term use and habitation in this part of the Karystia. While the peninsula is agriculturally poor, its coast is blessed with several small coastal inlets and one important ancient port, Geraistos. These provide access to vital maritime routes and connect the peninsula to Athens and other Aegean ports. The survey revealed modest use of the peninsula during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age; it was then virtually abandoned for the following two and a half millennia. Occupation resumed in the Late Archaic–Early Classical period, followed by near desertion in the 3rd century BC of all but some coastal sites, a resurgence of activity in the Late Roman period, and modest use in Byzantine and Ottoman times. The authors analyse the ways in which the peninsula's use was connected to that of the main urban centre at Karystos, and how the peninsula and the greater Karystia were integrated into the political, economic, and cultural spheres of Athens and the broader region.

About the Authors
JERE M. WICKENS, a co-director of the Southern Euboea Exploration Project, is interested in the use of rural areas and the use of caves. Outside of the Karystia, he has conducted fieldwork in Albania and Attica, Greece, where he is conducting a diachronic study of the use of caves and rock shelters.

SUSAN I. ROTROFF has published several volumes on the Hellenistic pottery of the Athenian Agora and of Sardis, in Turkey, and is particularly interested in the use of pottery to reconstruct the activities of people of the past. She is a MacArthur Fellow and winner of the Gold Medal of the Archaeological Institute of America.

TRACEY CULLEN is an Aegean prehistorian who has participated in fieldwork in Greece and Cyprus, focusing on the study of early ceramics and funerary customs. She served as Associate Editor of the American Journal of Archaeology and later as Editor of Hesperia, and currently lives in northern Minnesota (USA).

LAUREN E. TALALAY is an Aegean prehistorian who focuses on the Neolithic period of Greece and the Mediterranean. Her research explores the use of the human body as a symbol, figurines, and gender. She also publishes on contemporary issues, particularly on the employment of archaeological and mythical images in modern advertising and political cartoons. The former Associate Director and Curator at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, University of Michigan, she is currently Curator Emerita and Research Associate at the Kelsey Museum.

CATHERINE PERLÈS is a specialist of Greek Prehistoric stone tools and of the Greek Neolithic. She has worked extensively on trade networks and holds an Honorary degree from Indiana University.

FLOYD W. MCCOY is a geoarchaeologist/geologist with research emphasis on the interaction of volcanism and climate change with ancient and modern cultures both in Hawaii and Greece. He is professor in geology, geophysics, and oceanography at the University of Hawaii.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction; Previous Research by SEEP in the Karystia; Archaeological Work on the Bouros-Kastri Peninsula; Goals and Scope of the Bouros-Kastri Survey; Chapter 2: Topography, Geology, and Tectonics; Topography; Geology and Tectonics of Southern Euboia; Geomorphology; Tectonics, Sea-Level Changes, and Palaeoclimates; Paleozoic–Mesozoic Bedrock; Cenozoic Rocks and Sediments; Soils; Natural Resources; Natural Hazards; Chapter 3: Chronological Overview of the Karystia; Prehistory; Late Neolithic; Final Neolithic; Early Bronze Age; Middle Bronze Age; Late Bronze Age; Historical Periods; Early
Cycladic Archaeology and Research: New Approaches and Discoveries edited by Erica Angliker and John Tully. 298pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 417 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918095. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918101. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Cycladic Archaeology and Research: New approaches and discoveries reflects the present exciting times in Cycladic archaeology. New excavations are bringing to light sanctuaries unmentioned by literary sources and inscriptions (e.g., Kythnos, Despotiko); new theoretical approaches to insularity and networks are radically changing our views of the Cyclades as geographic and cultural unit(s). Furthermore, the restoration and restudy of older sites (e.g., Delos, Paros, Naxos) are challenging old truths, updating chronologies and contexts throughout the Mediterranean and beyond. This volume is intended to share these recent developments with a broader, international audience. The essays have been carefully selected as representing some of the most important recent work and include significant previously-unpublished material. Individually, they cover archaeological sites and materials from across the Cycladic islands, and illustrate the diversity of the islands’ material culture across the Geometric, Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman, and Late Antique periods. Together, they share common themes such as the importance of connectivity, and the role of each island’s individual landscape and its resources in shaping human activity. The work they represent attests the ongoing appeal of the islands and of the islanders in the collective imagination, and demonstrates the scope for still further innovative work in the years ahead.

About the Editors
ERICA ANGLIKER is a PhD student at the University of Zurich, where she is preparing the publication of her monograph on the cults and sanctuaries of the Cycladic islands. She has published on the culture and religion of the Cyclades and is a member of the scientific team at the excavations of the sanctuary of Despotiko, where she has been digging since 2012. Her research focuses on Greek cults and religions in the public and private sphere, from the Geometric to the Hellenistic era. Her special interests include cults practised at natural sites or involving natural elements, as well as topics in island studies, such as insularity, socioeconomic networks, and maritime travel logs.

JOHN TULLY studied Greats at the University of Oxford before writing his doctoral dissertation on the Hellenistic Cyclades at Harvard and Princeton. He is now a principal at Delivery Associates, where he helps governments improve the lives of citizens.
Naturvorstellungen im Altertum Schilderungen und Darstellungen von Natur im Alten Orient und in der griechischen Antike edited by Florian Schimpf, Dominik Berrens, Katharina Hillenbrand, Tim Brandes and Carrie Schidlo. ii+285 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). German text. 411 2018. ISBN 9781784918255. £32.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Everyone who investigates pre-modern concepts of nature cannot avoid a critical reflection on the ancient understandings of it. Here, “nature” is understood in the sense of a seemingly untouched space, largely independent of human culture. While this concept of “nature” is prevalent in modern times, the reconstruction of ancient ideas is difficult in that concepts of nature, if at all present, emphasize other aspects. For example, the Greek term φύσις in pre-Hellenistic times defines the nature of a thing rather than an untouched environment. A word for “nature” in this sense has not been handed down to us in the remaining texts of the Ancient Near East and Classical Antiquity. Nevertheless, such concepts can certainly be reconstructed from descriptions of nature to be found in literature and the representations of natural elements in art.

The present volume aims at identifying these concepts of nature in texts as well as in archaeological remains of the Ancient Near Eastern and the Greek culture from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. Contributions from the fields of archaeology and philology are juxtaposed for each time period in chronological order. This arrangement provides a good overview of the concepts of nature prevailing throughout different period and cultures.

GERMAN DESCRIPTION: Der Begriff „Natur“ wird in modernen, mitteleuropäischen Gesellschaften meist im Sinne eines vermeintlich unberührten Raumes verstanden, der weitgehend unbeeinflusst von menschlicher Kultur ist. Für vormoderne Kulturen lassen sich solche Vorstellungen bzw. Konzepte sehr viel schwieriger nachweisen, da beispielsweise ein Wort für „Natur“ mit der eben genannten Bedeutung in den erhaltenen Texten des Alten Orients und der griechischen Antike so nicht überliefert zu sein scheint. Gleichwohl werden durchaus Naturelemente in der antiken Literatur, der Flächenkunst sowie in antiken Monumenten beschrieben bzw. abgebildet sowie als integrative Bestandteile genutzt und funktionalisiert. Daraus lassen sich Konzepte von „Natur“ herausarbeiten und rekonstruieren. Der vorliegende Band möchte solche „Naturkonzepte“ in Texten, Artefakten und Denkmälern des Alten Orients und des griechischen Kulturraumes von der Archaik bis in den Hellenismus identifizieren und einen Überblick über die jeweils in einem bestimmten Zeit- und Kulturraum vorherrschenden Vorstellungen sowie deren diachrone Entwicklung geben.

About the Editors
FLORIAN SCHIMPF studied Classical Archaeology and History at the universities of Frankfurt and Istanbul, whilst gaining practical experiences by participating in excavations in Priene (Turkey), Portugal and on the Balkans. In 2013 he joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on natural sanctuaries in ancient Greece and Asia Minor. His research interests lie in the fields of religious history, Greek cult practices and metrology.

DOMINIK BERRENS studied Classical Philology and Biology at the University of Freiburg. From 2013-2017 he was part of the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz, where he received his doctorate with a dissertation on social insects in antiquity in 2016. Since October 2017 he has been a postdoctoral researcher working on the project “NOSCEMUS – Nova Scientia: Early Modern Science and Latin” funded by the European Research Council at the University of Innsbruck. His research interests lie in pre-modern scientific texts and ancient drama.

KATHARINA HILLENBRAND studied Classical Philology and German Studies at the Universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt. In 2014 she joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on concepts of volcanic phenomena in Roman antiquity. Currently she is working at the department of Classical Philology at the University o
Visualizing cityscapes of Classical antiquity: from early modern reconstruction drawings to digital 3D models With a case study from the ancient town of Koroneia in Boeotia, Greece by Chiara Piccoli. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+314 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (100 colour plates). 53 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918897. £59.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918903. Book contents pageDownload

The amount of 3D modelling applications in archaeology has increased enormously over the last decade. 3D recording techniques allow researchers to quickly and accurately document archaeological evidence, and 3D reconstructions have created new possibilities to communicate the results to a larger public. In this latter case, however, numerous scholars have expressed their concern regarding the ethics of such digital representations, since they give prominence to a crystallized image of the past and do not account for the complexity of the archaeological record. The study presented here aims to make a practical contribution to a new understanding and use of 3D reconstructions, namely as ‘laboratories’ to test hypotheses and visualize, evaluate and discuss alternative interpretations.

In order to do so, an analysis of visual reconstructions of the early and late modern period is presented first, followed by a discussion of current applications of 3D digital reconstructions, with a special focus on cityscapes. Lastly, a practical implementation of a research-driven, intellectually transparent and GIS-based 3D reconstruction is proposed for the urban site of Koroneia, in Boeotia, Central Greece. Specifically, the methodology developed in this work uses tools that are employed in geo-design and modern urban planning in an innovative way, integrating GIS with a rule-based modelling approach. With a strong focus on the automation and iteration of the reconstruction process, our 3D visualization provides an intuitive insight into hidden relationships and associations among data, and allows the creation and evaluation of alternative reconstruction hypotheses.

About the Author
CHIARA PICCOLI is an Italian archaeologist currently employed as a staff member of the Digital Archaeology Research group at the Faculty of Archaeology in Leiden, The Netherlands. Her expertise lies in the applications of 3D modelling techniques and 2D-3D GIS to visualize and analyse archaeological evidence. Her research interests include urban studies, visual studies, and the exploitation of digital tools and new technologies for documentation, visualization, analysis and dissemination. She has participated in several excavations and surveys in Italy, Greece and Morocco. Chiara holds a BA in Cultural Heritage (University of Trento), an MA in Greek and Roman Archaeology (University of Siena) and an MA in Book and Digital Media Studies (Leiden University). She received the Tiele-Stichting Thesis Prize 2011 for the best MA dissertation in the field of Book History in the Netherlands.
Commemorating Conflict: Greek Monuments of the Persian Wars by Xavier Duffy. viii+210 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 10 plates in colour. 412 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918392. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918408. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study is concerned with how the Greek peoples, of primarily the classical period, collectively commemorated the Persian Wars. The data presented here are public monuments, which include both physical and behavioural commemorations. The aim of this work is to reveal and present the methods by which Greeks of the fifth century BC commemorated the Persian Wars. Several trends have drawn attention away from studies presenting commemorative practices in their entirety: the focus on singular monument types, individual commemorative places, a particular commemorating group or specific battle, and an overemphasis on Athenian commemorations. This project works towards rectifying this issue by highlighting the variations in commemorative traditions. This holistic approach to the data, which is inclusive in its remit of commemorative objects, places, and groups, allows for a more complete representation of the commemorative tradition. What emerges from this study is the compilation of all known ancient Greek monuments to commemorate the battles of Marathon, Salamis, Artemisium, Thermopylae and Plataea.

About the Author
XAVIER DUFFY graduated with a PhD in the commemoration of ancient Greek warfare in 2016 from the University of Birmingham’s School of Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology. Xavier has taught Classical Archaeology at the University of London and University of Winchester and has a keen interest in material culture. This interest was nurtured while working as Assistant Collections Manager at the British Museum from 2009-2017. This book is the result of Xavier’s postgraduate research on the commemorations of the Persian Wars specifically.

Table of Contents
PREFACE; 1: INTRODUCTION; 2: CONTEXTUALISING THE COMMEMORATIONS OF THE PERSIAN WARS; 3: COMMEMORATIVE GROUPS AND COMMEMORATIVE PLACES; 4: MONUMENTS BY TYPE; 5: THE MONUMENTS AND THE EVIDENCE; BIBLIOGRAPHY
KYMISSALA: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability by Manolis I. Stefanakis. xii+192 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and Greek.. 52 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917685. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917692. Book contents pageDownload

The area of Kymissala on the southwest coast of Rhodes is of great archaeological interest, as it conceals a large number of important archaeological sites belonging to the lesser known ancient deme of the Rhodian countryside, the deme of Kymissaleis. The region is also of exceptional environmental and ecological importance, as it has a particular biodiversity and is protected by the European ‘Natura 2000’ network of nature protection areas.

Kymissala has systematically been researched during the past 10 years by the Kymissala Archaeological Research Project (KARP) inaugurated by the Department of Mediterranean Studies and the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese in 2006.

The research, escaping from its narrow academic and archaeological context and exploiting the comparative advantage of the region, may –and should– inter alia, intervene in a mild and sustainable manner in the promotion of the archaeological site of Kymissala. Its ultimate goal is to promote the antiquities of the area, its educational value and its historical and cultural continuity within a protected natural environment, in the context of an ecological-archaeological park.

Under the title Kymissala: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability, fourteen original studies have been published, constituting the first complete presentation of the area of Kymissala and the work in progress, after ten years of systematic research, in terms of Archaeology, Education and Sustainable Development.

About the Author
Manolis I. Stefanakis is an Associate Professor in Classical Archaeology and Numismatics in the Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean. Director of Postgraduate Studies in ‘Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean from the Prehistoric Era to the Late Antiquity: Greece, Egypt, Near East’.

Director of the University of the Aegean Archaeological Research in Kymissala, Rhodes (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese) since 2006. Co-director (with Professor Nikolaos Stampolidis) of the University of the Aegean excavation (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of Rethymno) of the fortified citadel of Orne in Retymno, Crete, since 2016.

Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Dr. Nikos Litinas) of the annual scientific journal Eulimene: Studies in Classical Archaeology, Epigraphy, Numismatics and Papyrology, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society (ISSN 1108-5800) and of Eulimene Series of Independent Publications, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society. Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Assistant Professor Sotiris Ntalis) of the annual scientific journal Yearbook of Mediterranean Studies, Rhodes.

His research interests focus on Field Archaeology, Classical Archaeology, Ancient Greek Numismatics, Archaeology and Sustainability.
Le classi ceramiche della “tradizione mista” a Kos nel Tardo Bronzo IA by Salvatore Vitale. 208 pages; illustrations in colour and black & white. Italian text.. 51 2018. ISBN 9781784918859. Download

This volume focuses on the pottery classes of the “Entangled Tradition” recovered at the settlement of the “Serraglio” on Kos during the late Bronze Age and into the Iron Age. The results reveal new information on the chronology, typology, and decoration of Koan Painted Fine (PF) and Koan Painted Medium-Coarse to Coarse (PMC-C), ceramics. Moreover, the fresh analysis of the chaîne opératoire used to manufacture these classes and the assessment of consumption patterns contribute to a wider understanding of the socio-cultural and political implications of the Koan pottery assemblage during the early part of the late Bronze Age.

The data presented in this volume indicate that PF and PMC-C ceramics represent a unique case of fully entangled classes in the Aegean, which merged features of the Koan “Local Tradition” with characteristics of the Minoan and Minoanizing potting traditions of Crete and the Cyclades into a new technological and stylistic language. Contacts between these different cultures are explained based on the theoretical model provided by “human mobility”. The specific Koan cultural synthesis, however, was endorsed and promoted by the local elites at the settlement of the “Serraglio”, which aimed to participate in the “new environment” determined by the economic and cultural expansion of Neopalatial Crete.

In this respect, the manufacture of Koan Entangled classes served a dual scope. On the one hand, using transport containers made in the PMC-C class, Koan products were exported and exchanged throughout the Aegean. In addition, the finer vessels of the Koan “Entangled Tradition” were utilized for promoting Minoan-type social practices at the “Serraglio”. Through these practices, Koan elites aimed to redefine their identity and portray an image of higher status within the local social arena.

About the Author
Dr. Salvatore Vitale completed his MA in Classical Literatures and PhD in Classical Archaeology at the University of Pisa in 2001 and 2007 respectively, under the supervision of Professors M. Benzi and Giampaolo Graziadio. After completion of his PhD, Dr. Vitale held post-doctoral and research fellowships at the Universities of Calabria, Cincinnati, and Pisa and at the Italian Archaeological School at Athens.

Since 2009, he has been the director of the “Serraglio, Eleona, and Langada Archaeological Project” (SELAP), a research endeavor carried out under the auspices of the Italian Archaeological School at Athens. The main goal of SELAP is to provide new information on the island of Kos from the Final Neolithic until the Late Protogeometric period.
Great Waterworks in Roman Greece Aqueducts and Monumental Fountain Structures: Function in Context edited by Georgia A. Aristodemou and Theodosios P. Tassios. iv+258 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (52 colour pages). 394 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 35. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917647. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917654. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In recent years an increasing worldwide awareness of the importance of water management in the ancient civilizations has generated much new discussion on water archaeology in ancient Greece.

The present volume, Great Waterworks in Roman Greece, consists the very first presentation of large scale waterworks in the Greek provinces of the Roman Empire. As a collective work, it brings together a wide body of experts from the newly emerged and expanding field of water technology and water archaeology in Roman Greece, and it fills an essential gap in archaeological research and relative bibliography regarding water management and monumental water structures in Greece during the Roman period. Among the main goals that this multi-author volume attempts to succeed is to show that great waterworks (namely aqueducts and nymphaea) not only were novelties in the Greek provinces, both in form and function, but they also changed the architectural landscape of their surrounding environments, and they introduced the concept of luxury in the urban landscapes of Roman Greece. The discussed papers deploy along a wide geographical area, covering the roman provinces of Macedonia and Thrace, Epirus, Achaia, the Aegean islands and Crete, between the 1st century BC and the 4th century AD.

Collective studies such as this, not only will enlighten and promote the multifaceted significance of the archaeological remains regarding water management technology of the Roman period in the Greek regions, but they will also reveal the significant impact of the Roman technological heritage in the Greek territories.

About the Author:
Georgia Aristodemou is a Researcher of Roman Archaeology. She completed her MA and PhD studies at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Her research and publications focus on monumental architecture and the sculptural display programmes deploying on the facades of theatres and nymphaea in the Eastern Provinces of the Roman Empire, along with their impact and use in the formation of social, cultural and political identities in the provinces. She served in various museum projects and excavations throughout Macedonia and Thrace, especially in the region of Kavalla and the Island of Thasos. She participated at the research project for the exploration and restoration of the ancient theatre of Philippi and she is engaged with the project of studying the sculptural decoration of the monument. Since 2009, she is an academic member of the School of Humanities of the International Hellenic University (Thessaloniki, Greece), where she teaches courses on Roman Art and Archaeology of the Black Sea and the wider Eastern Mediterranean region and she coordinates the annual International Summer School on Ancient Technology. She is the author of a book on roman nymphaea and many papers on roman sculpture and architecture. She is a member of several Greek and International archaeological Societies and Associations.

Theodosios P. Tassios, Professor Emeritus of the National Technical University of Athens is an academic, civil engineer, author and writer. He is a member of the Academy of Sciences of Torino (IT), doctor honoris causa of Liege University (BΕ), S.E. University of Nanjing (CN), Democritos University (GR), Aristotle University (GR), Cyprus University, the National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, and the Panteion Unversity (GR). His teaching and publications extend in the areas of Soil Mechanics, Bridge Design, Dams and Tunnels, Concrete Technology and Ancient Greek Technology. He has also dealt with a wide range of scientific, technological and educational issues (European and national regulations, antiseismic protection, monument protection, public works), along with subjects of Ph
The Lamps of Late Antiquity from Rhodes 3rd–7th centuries AD by Angeliki Katsioti. ii+676 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 384 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917463. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917470. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The city of Rhodes was an important harbour in the Hellenistic period, and although its political role in the Roman period was significantly diminished, it never ceased to be a key hub for trade. The catastrophic earthquake of 515 AD marked the transition from the Late Roman to the Early Byzantine period in Rhodes. The glorious ancient city shrunk in size; its streets, which had been laid out according to the Hippodamian grid, were encroached upon and large basilicas were founded on the sites of ancient sanctuaries. A significant portion of the city has been uncovered over the past few years by rescue excavation, revealing houses, mansions, streets and extensive cemeteries, all yielding a large quantity of finds. This study focuses on the recording, study and publication of the corpus of the Late Antique lamps dating from the 3rd to the 7th centuries as found in these rescue excavations in the town of Rhodes. The lamps of this period from Rhodes and the other Dodecanesian islands are nearly unknown in the bibliography. The aim here is to present the diachronic changes in the artistic sensibility and preferences of this particular market. An integral component in this process are topographical observations regarding the Early Byzantine town of Rhodes, giving some details about the extent of the building remains. In addition, facets of the economic and commercial activities of the island during Late Antiquity are highlighted. Subjects such as the transformation/adaptation of the ancient city to new circumstances are also debated. For some lamps, analyses of the clay have been undertaken and the results are presented.

About the Author
Dr Angeliki Katsioti works for the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports at the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese, as a Head of the Department of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Sites, Monuments, Research and Museums. Her main research interests are Late Roman archaeology, as well as Byzantine art and iconography.
Immagini del tempo degli dei, immagini del tempo degli uomini Un’analisi delle iconografie dei mesi nei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e del loro contest storico-culturale by Ciro Parodo. viii+338 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English summary. 376 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 30. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917340. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917357. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A characteristic shared by the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars is that they represent the twelve months of the year, referable to an iconographic repertoire which is divided into three themes: the astrological-astronomical, the festive-ritual and the rural-seasonal. With regard to the first type, the months are depicted through images of the signs of the zodiac, often associated with images of the guardian deities of the months; the second category includes depictions of the months that refer to some important religious festivals; finally, the third theme includes images of the months that allude to the most important work activities performed in the countryside. The figurative calendars, which in most cases are made on mosaics, are characterized by a wide distribution in terms of time, concentrated between the 3rd and 6th century, and geography, with the areas of greatest attestation consisting of Italy, Africa Proconsularis, Greece and Arabia. With regard to the architectural context, the calendars from the West are prevalently documented in the domus, while those from the East are particularly attested in ecclesiastical buildings. The aim of research presented in this volume is the in-depth study of the connections between the meaning of the iconography of the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars and their historical and cultural context.

About the Author:
Ciro Parodo (1978) received a Degree and a Post-Graduate Degree in Archaeology at the University of Cagliari (Italy), and a PhD in Classical Archaeology at the Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen (Germany). He focuses his research on two principal domains: the study of Greek and Roman Iconography as a means of understanding the social and cultural issues of the Classical World, and the reception of Classical Antiquity in the Modern and Contemporary Age.

Italian Description:
La caratteristica comune dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini consiste nella rappresentazione dei dodici mesi dell’anno, riferibile a un repertorio iconografico articolato in tre temi: quelli di tipo astrologico-astronomico, festivo-rituale e rurale-stagionale. Per quanto riguarda la prima tipologia, i mesi sono raffigurati mediante le immagini dei segni zodiacali, spesso associate a quelle delle divinità tutelari mensili; la seconda categoria include quelle raffigurazioni dei mesi che si riferiscono ad alcune importanti festività religiose; la terza tematica, infine, comprende quelle immagini dei mesi che alludono alle più rilevanti attività lavorative svolte in ambito campestre. I calendari figurati, realizzati nella maggioranza dei casi su mosaico, si contraddistinguono per un’ampia distribuzione in senso temporale, con una concentrazione cronologica fra il III e il VI secolo d.C., e geografico, con le aree di maggior attestazione costituite dall’Italia, l’Africa Proconsularis, la Grecia e l’Arabia. In merito invece al contesto architettonico, i calendari di provenienza occidentale sono documentati in prevalenza presso le domus, mentre per quanto concerne quelli orientali, sono attestati in particolare negli edifici ecclesiastici. L’obiettivo della ricerca presentata in questo volume si focalizza sull’approfondimento delle connessioni esistenti tra il significato dell’iconografia dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e il loro contesto storico- culturale.

Ciro Parodo (1978) ha conseguito la Laurea e la Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l’Università di Cagliari (Italia) e il Dottorato di Ricerca in Archeologia Classica presso l’Eberhard- Karls-Universität di Tübingen (Germania). Focalizza la sua ricerca su due ambiti principali: lo studio dell’iconografia greca e romana come strumento per analizzare le problematiche socio- culturali del mondo classico e l’indagine delle dinamiche di ricezione dell’antichità classica nell’età moderna e contemporanea.
Parian Polyandreia: The Late Geometric Funerary Legacy of Cremated Soldiers’ Bones on Socio-Political Affairs and Military Organizational Preparedness in Ancient Greece by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. xii+400 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 colour plates). 375 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917197. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917203. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The anthropological study of two late 8th century BC monumental graves, designated as T144 and T105, at the ancient necropolis of Paroikia at Paros, initially intended to investigate inter-island features of the human condition, observable as ingrained traces in the human skeletal record, as it may have related to the Parian endeavors in the northern Aegean for the colonization of Thasos.

Through the ‘Paros Polyandreia Anthropological Project,’ it was possible to retrieve insights into aspects of the human environments and experiences that had transpired in a Parian context, elucidated by a considerable population sample of cremated male individuals, transcending to broader features that would have involved Thasos; discerning further facets of the human condition during the Late Geometric to the Early Archaic periods in the ancient Hellenic world.

This book integrates the basic anthropological data, evaluations and assessments derived from the study of the human skeletal record of Polyandreia T144, and T105. Bioarchaeological and forensic anthropological research results include the morphometric analyses of biological developmental growth and variability in relation to manifestations of acquired skeleto-anatomic changes, along with inquiries into the demographic dynamics, and the palaeopathologic profile of the individuals involved. Such intra-site data juxtaposed afforded the possibility to deliberate on issues of the preparedness, intended purpose, function, and symbolic meaning of the funerary activity areas and to reflect on the organizational abilities and capacities of the political and military affairs of the Parians.

Moreover, inter-site evaluations where relative with the burial grounds of Orthi Petra of Eleutherna-Crete, Plithos of Naxos, Athenian Demosion Sema, Pythagoreion of Samos, and Rhodes offer comparisons on taphonomy, on cremated materials’ metric analyses, and on aspects of the funerary customs and practices in the interring of cremated war dead.
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 2 2017 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). xii+220 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 2 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 2399-1844-2-2017. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2399-1852-2-2017. Book contents pageDownload

Table of Contents

Articles:
• Nadia Aleotti, Rhodian Amphoras from Butrint (Albania): Dating, Contexts and Trade
• Donald T. Ariel, Imported Hellenistic Stamped Amphora Handles and Fragments from the North Sinai Survey
• Ofra Guri-Rimon, Stone Ossuaries in the Hecht Museum Collection and the Issue of Ossuaries Use for Burial
• Gabriel Mazor & Walid Atrash, Nysa-Scythopolis: The Hellenistic Polis
• Hélène Machline & Yuval Gadot, Wading Through Jerusalem’s Garbage: Chronology, Function, and Formation Process of the Pottery Assemblages of the City’s Early Roman Landfill
• Kyriakos Savvopoulos, Two Hadra Hydriae in the Colection of the Patriarchal Sacristy in Alexandria
• Wolf Rudolph & Michalis Fotiadis, Neapolis Scythica – Simferopol – Test Excavations 1993

Archaeological News and Projects:
• »Dig for a Day« with the Archaeological Seminars Institute

Reviews:
• John Lund, A Study of the Circulation of Ceramics in Cyprus from the 3rd Century BC to the 3rd Century AD (by Brandon R. Olson)
• Gloria London, Ancient Cookware from the Levant. An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective (by John Tidmarsh)
• Michela Spataro & Alexandra Villing (eds.), Ceramics, Cuisine and Culture: The Archaeology and Sience of Kitchen Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom)
• James C. R. Gill, Dakhleh Oasis and the Western Desert of Egypt under the Ptolemies (by Andrea M. Berlin)
• Anna Gamberini, Ceramiche fini ellenistiche da Phoinike. Forme, produzioni, commerce (by Carlo De Mitri)
• Maja Mise, Gnathia and Related Hellenistic Ware on the East Adriatic Coast (by Patricia Kögler)
• Jens-Arne Dickmann & Alexander Heinemann (eds.), Vom Trinken und Bechern. Das antike Gelage im Umbruch (by Stella Drougou)
Autour de l’infanterie d’élite macédonienne à l’époque du royaume antigonide Cinq études militaires entre histoire, philologie et archéologie by Pierre O. Juhel. x+278 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. 373 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917326. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917333. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents five articles relating to military studies in the context of Macedonia of the Antigonids. Combining literary studies and archaeological research, the author proposes several new concepts on Hellenistic Macedonian military studies. Originally conceived as separate journal articles supporting a more general publication on the Macedonian army of Alexander the Great, it became clear it would be more useful and valuable to publish the articles together in one volume as they closely reference each other. Articles consider the Macedonian phalanx, Antigonid elite infantry, heavy infantry and defensive weaponry under the following headings: I. La nature de la phalange macédonienne ou quand la science recule; II. Antigonid Redcoats. L’infanterie d’élite de l’armée du royaume de Macédoine à l’époque hellénistique. Histoire et iconographie; III. ‘Infanterie lourde’ : une notion entre armement et ordonnance tactique; IV. Remarques philologiques et historiques sur l’ambivalence de termes relatifs aux institutions militaires macédoniennes chez les historiens de l’Antiquité; V. Deux nouvelles armes défensives de l’époque hellénistique.

French Description:
Ces cinq études militaires résultent essentiellement de développements présentés dans le manuscrit doctoral de l’auteur, L’Armée du royaume de Macédoine à l’époque hellénistique (323-148 av. J.-C.). Les troupes « nationales », présenté en Sorbonne le 11 janvier 2007. L’idée première avait été de les publier sous forme d’articles. Mais ce projet se heurtait à une difficulté. Ces textes se faisant écho, il s’avèrerait difficile d’attendre la diffusion du premier d’entre eux pour présenter les suivants tout en faisant exactement référence à un voire à plusieurs textes en cours de publication. Aussi apparut-il qu’il valait mieux les réunir en un recueil dont la cohérence serait assurée par un thème commun : l’histoire et l’archéologie militaire de l’époque hellenistique, tout particulièrement dans le cadre de la Macédoine des Antigonides.

Pierre Olivier Juhel est docteur en histoire et civilisation de l’Antiquité de l’Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV). Il est également titulaire d’une maîtrise de philosophie de l’Université Paris I (Panthéon–Sorbonne). Auteur de profession, il est spécialiste de l’histoire militaire de la fin de l’époque napoléonienne. En parallèle, dans la foulée de son doctorat consacré à l’armée macédonienne après Alexandre le Grand, il poursuit ses travaux académiques sur la Macédoine antique.
Imágenes de centauros en los vasos áticos de figuras negras y de figuras rojas Siglos VIII A.C. – IV A.C. by María Herranz. 298 pages; 15 graphs, 124 tables (all in colour). Spanish text with English summary.. 38 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916831. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916848. Book contents pageDownload

The centaur, a hybrid being with the body of horse and a human head and torso, first appeared in the mountains of Thessaly. This was the Greek horse-breeding region and it seemed natural for the centaur to have originated there, in the heart of this exclusive heritage of the landed gentry. Centaurs belonged to the spheres of heroic mythology, with clear ties to the values of the aristocracy.

This book is composed of a catalogue divided into nine chapters. Each chapter comprises catalogue entries for a number of black-figure and red-figure Attic vases. The division into chapters is based on the various types of centaurs and different conflicts, either among themselves or against a hero. In addition to the catalogue is a chapter on images and statistics. Each of these nine chapters corresponds to a section of catalogue entries and statistics, as the information refers to two examples in each section, one in black figures and another in red figures. The highlighted examples illustrate the variety of different vase types (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC). The statistics are likewise divided into black and red figures, and various themes, such as the centaur Pholos and the banquet, or Herakles and Nessos. For each of these themes or groups of examples, a table is given showing the number of vases (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their place in the chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC, etc.).

The Mycenaean Cemetery at Agios Vasileios, Chalandritsa, in Achaea by Konstantina Aktypi with contributions by Olivia A. Jones and Vivian Staikou. xii+296 pages; 287 figures, 8 tables, 3 maps (163 plates in colour). 367 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916978. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916985. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean chamber-tomb cemetery at Agios Vasileios, near Chalandritsa in Achaea, was first investigated by Nikolaos Kyparissis in the late 1920s, followed by small-scale research in 1961 by Efthimios Mastrokostas. In the years 1989–2001 more rescue excavations were conducted by the Greek Archaeological Service, revealing 30 chamber tombs, some looted. Based mostly on the latest research, this study is the first major presentation of the cemetery and its finds. The topographical data are presented in chapter A, including the most important ancient sites in the region. Chapters B to E deal with the 45 chamber tombs and with the assemblage of the 260 artefacts found in them. The chipped stone assemblage and the ground stone implements are presented in chapter F by Vivian Staikou. Chapter G, by Olivia A. Jones, deals with the human skeletal remains, focussing on burial customs and practices. Chapters H and I handle the discussion and the concluding remarks, respectively. A series of 3D representations and photorealistic illustrations are presented, based on the original plans and architectural drawings of the tombs, to produce a visual appreciation of the important cemetery, unfortunately no longer visible.

About the Author
Konstantina Aktypi obtained her BA in Archaeology at the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and Certificates in Heritage Management, Administration, and Developing Communication Skills and Responses to Crisis. She has participated in projects of intensive archaeological survey and systematic excavations in Achaea and Aitoloakarnania. Since 1995, she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities of Achaea, conducting rescue excavations in the region dating from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman period. From 2002 to 2011 she worked at the excavations of the Mycenaean settlement and chamber tomb cemetery at Voudeni, also holding a supervisorial position for the major restoration works there. Her current research interests include the study of the chamber tombs at Voudeni, an Early Bronze Age settlement near Patras and the two best preserved tholos tombs in Achaea, in the prehistoric cemetery at Rhodia. She is also working on educational programs, introducing students to the art of Archaeology.

Olivia A. Jones obtained a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and History at West Virginia University and a Masters in Aegean Archaeology at University College London. She has worked in academic and contract archaeology projects in the United States and Greece. She is currently completing her doctoral research at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. Her research interests include applying a bioarchaeological approach to Mycenaean mortuary practices.

Vivian Staikou is an archaeologist of the Ephorate of Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. She studied Archaeology and Fine Arts in the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and received an MA in Prehistoric Archaeology from the University of Crete. Over the years she has carried out archaeological fieldwork in Attica, Achaea, Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. Her current research interests include lithic technologies, the Palaeolithic of Western Greece and the archaeology of the island of Lefkas. She also has a particular interest in developing educational programs for children.