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NEW: Immagini del tempo degli dei, immagini del tempo degli uomini Un’analisi delle iconografie dei mesi nei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e del loro contest storico-culturale by Ciro Parodo. viii+338 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English summary. 376 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 30. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917340. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917357. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A characteristic shared by the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars is that they represent the twelve months of the year, referable to an iconographic repertoire which is divided into three themes: the astrological-astronomical, the festive-ritual and the rural-seasonal. With regard to the first type, the months are depicted through images of the signs of the zodiac, often associated with images of the guardian deities of the months; the second category includes depictions of the months that refer to some important religious festivals; finally, the third theme includes images of the months that allude to the most important work activities performed in the countryside. The figurative calendars, which in most cases are made on mosaics, are characterized by a wide distribution in terms of time, concentrated between the 3rd and 6th century, and geography, with the areas of greatest attestation consisting of Italy, Africa Proconsularis, Greece and Arabia. With regard to the architectural context, the calendars from the West are prevalently documented in the domus, while those from the East are particularly attested in ecclesiastical buildings. The aim of research presented in this volume is the in-depth study of the connections between the meaning of the iconography of the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars and their historical and cultural context.

About the Author:
Ciro Parodo (1978) received a Degree and a Post-Graduate Degree in Archaeology at the University of Cagliari (Italy), and a PhD in Classical Archaeology at the Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen (Germany). He focuses his research on two principal domains: the study of Greek and Roman Iconography as a means of understanding the social and cultural issues of the Classical World, and the reception of Classical Antiquity in the Modern and Contemporary Age. Italian Description: La caratteristica comune dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini consiste nella rappresentazione dei dodici mesi dell’anno, riferibile a un repertorio iconografico articolato in tre temi: quelli di tipo astrologico-astronomico, festivo-rituale e rurale-stagionale. Per quanto riguarda la prima tipologia, i mesi sono raffigurati mediante le immagini dei segni zodiacali, spesso associate a quelle delle divinità tutelari mensili; la seconda categoria include quelle raffigurazioni dei mesi che si riferiscono ad alcune importanti festività religiose; la terza tematica, infine, comprende quelle immagini dei mesi che alludono alle più rilevanti attività lavorative svolte in ambito campestre. I calendari figurati, realizzati nella maggioranza dei casi su mosaico, si contraddistinguono per un’ampia distribuzione in senso temporale, con una concentrazione cronologica fra il III e il VI secolo d.C., e geografico, con le aree di maggior attestazione costituite dall’Italia, l’Africa Proconsularis, la Grecia e l’Arabia. In merito invece al contesto architettonico, i calendari di provenienza occidentale sono documentati in prevalenza presso le domus, mentre per quanto concerne quelli orientali, sono attestati in particolare negli edifici ecclesiastici. L’obiettivo della ricerca presentata in questo volume si focalizza sull’approfondimento delle connessioni esistenti tra il significato dell’iconografia dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e il loro contesto storico- culturale.

Ciro Parodo (1978) ha conseguito la Laurea e la Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l’Università di Cagliari (Italia) e il Dottorato di Ricerca in Archeologia Classica presso l’Eberhard- Karls-Universität di Tübingen (Germania). Focalizza la sua ricerca su due ambiti principali: lo studio dell’iconografia greca e romana come strumento per analizzare le problematiche socio- culturali del mondo classico e l’indagine delle dinamiche di ricezione dell’antichità classica nell’età moderna e contemporanea.
NEW: Parian Polyandreia: The Late Geometric Funerary Legacy of Cremated Soldiers’ Bones on Socio-Political Affairs and Military Organizational Preparedness in Ancient Greece by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. xii+400 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 colour plates). 375 2017. ISBN 9781784917197. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The anthropological study of two late 8th century BC monumental graves, designated as T144 and T105, at the ancient necropolis of Paroikia at Paros, initially intended to investigate inter-island features of the human condition, observable as ingrained traces in the human skeletal record, as it may have related to the Parian endeavors in the northern Aegean for the colonization of Thasos.

Through the ‘Paros Polyandreia Anthropological Project,’ it was possible to retrieve insights into aspects of the human environments and experiences that had transpired in a Parian context, elucidated by a considerable population sample of cremated male individuals, transcending to broader features that would have involved Thasos; discerning further facets of the human condition during the Late Geometric to the Early Archaic periods in the ancient Hellenic world.

This book integrates the basic anthropological data, evaluations and assessments derived from the study of the human skeletal record of Polyandreia T144, and T105. Bioarchaeological and forensic anthropological research results include the morphometric analyses of biological developmental growth and variability in relation to manifestations of acquired skeleto-anatomic changes, along with inquiries into the demographic dynamics, and the palaeopathologic profile of the individuals involved. Such intra-site data juxtaposed afforded the possibility to deliberate on issues of the preparedness, intended purpose, function, and symbolic meaning of the funerary activity areas and to reflect on the organizational abilities and capacities of the political and military affairs of the Parians.

Moreover, inter-site evaluations where relative with the burial grounds of Orthi Petra of Eleutherna-Crete, Plithos of Naxos, Athenian Demosion Sema, Pythagoreion of Samos, and Rhodes offer comparisons on taphonomy, on cremated materials’ metric analyses, and on aspects of the funerary customs and practices in the interring of cremated war dead.
FORTHCOMING: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 2 2017 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). 2 2017. ISBN SBN 2399-1844-2-2017. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

ISSN 2399-1844 (Print)
ISSN 2399-1852 (online)

Articles:
• Nadia Aleotti, Rhodian Amphoras from Butrint (Albania): Dating, Contexts and Trade
• Donald T. Ariel, Imported Hellenistic Stamped Amphora Handles and Fragments from the North Sinai Survey
• Ofra Guri-Rimon, Stone Ossuaries in the Hecht Museum Collection and the Issue of Ossuaries Use for Burial
• Gabriel Mazor & Walid Atrash, Nysa-Scythopolis: The Hellenistic Polis
• Hélène Machline & Yuval Gadot, Wading Through Jerusalem’s Garbage: Chronology, Function, and Formation Process of the Pottery Assemblages of the City’s Early Roman Landfill
• Kyriakos Savvopoulos, Two Hadra Hydriae in the Colection of the Patriarchal Sacristy in Alexandria
• Wolf Rudolph & Michalis Fotiadis, Neapolis Scythica – Simferopol – Test Excavations 1993

Archaeological News and Projects:
• »Dig for a Day« with the Archaeological Seminars Institute

Reviews:
• John Lund, A Study of the Circulation of Ceramics in Cyprus from the 3rd Century BC to the 3rd Century AD (by Brandon R. Olson)
• Gloria London, Ancient Cookware from the Levant. An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective (by John Tidmarsh)
• Michela Spataro & Alexandra Villing (eds.), Ceramics, Cuisine and Culture: The Archaeology and Sience of Kitchen Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom)
• James C. R. Gill, Dakhleh Oasis and the Western Desert of Egypt under the Ptolemies (by Andrea M. Berlin)
• Anna Gamberini, Ceramiche fini ellenistiche da Phoinike. Forme, produzioni, commerce (by Carlo De Mitri)
• Maja Mise, Gnathia and Related Hellenistic Ware on the East Adriatic Coast (by Patricia Kögler)
• Jens-Arne Dickmann & Alexander Heinemann (eds.), Vom Trinken und Bechern. Das antike Gelage im Umbruch (by Stella Drougou)

2017 PRINT SUBSCRIPTION RATES (1 issue in 2017):

Institutions:
£50.00 (plus standard shipping rates)
Agents will receive 25% discount on institutional print price including shipping rates as stated

Individuals:
£30.00 (plus standard shipping rates)
NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually in October/November edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). vi+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in printed and e-versions. 1 2016 Journal of Greek Archaeology . ISBN 2059-4674-2-2017. Book contents pageBuy Now

An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora. the Editorial Board is headed by Professor John Bintliff (Edinburgh University, U.K. and Leiden University, The Netherlands).

For a full mission statement and information on the editorial and advisory board please visit the JGA page of our website.

Subscriptions are now open for JGA Vol 2 via our website. Please find links for private and institutional subscriptions below. Print and digital copies are expected to become available in October 2017. Please send all subscription-based queries to info@archaeopress.com.

Subscribe online by following the links below:

For private subscriptions for personal use please click here (prices as follows):
Print: £65 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW). Includes free digital copy.
Special price for digital only subscribers: £25 (+VAT where applicable).

For institutional subscriptions please click here (prices as follows):
Print: £85 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW).
Print & Online access: £95 (+ VAT where applicable) including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW).
Online access only: £90 (+ VAT where applicable).


BACK-ISSUES

Volume 1 2016: Purchase back issues of JGA Volume 1 2016 by following the links below:

For private subscriptions for personal use please click here.

For institutional subscriptions please click here.

A free 70+ page sampler is available to download in our Open Access section designed to act as an introduction and taster to the scope and style of this new journal. It includes one complete paper and two review articles as well as full contents listings for Volume 1.

FORTHCOMING: The Lamps of Late Antiquity from Rhodes 3rd–7th centuries AD by Angeliki Katsioti. ii+676 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 384 2017. ISBN 9781784917463. £65.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The city of Rhodes was an important harbour in the Hellenistic period, and although its political role in the Roman period was significantly diminished, it never ceased to be a key hub for trade. The catastrophic earthquake of 515 AD marked the transition from the Late Roman to the Early Byzantine period in Rhodes. The glorious ancient city shrunk in size; its streets, which had been laid out according to the Hippodamian grid, were encroached upon and large basilicas were founded on the sites of ancient sanctuaries. A significant portion of the city has been uncovered over the past few years by rescue excavation, revealing houses, mansions, streets and extensive cemeteries, all yielding a large quantity of finds. This study focuses on the recording, study and publication of the corpus of the Late Antique lamps dating from the 3rd to the 7th centuries as found in these rescue excavations in the town of Rhodes. The lamps of this period from Rhodes and the other Dodecanesian islands are nearly unknown in the bibliography. The aim here is to present the diachronic changes in the artistic sensibility and preferences of this particular market. An integral component in this process are topographical observations regarding the Early Byzantine town of Rhodes, giving some details about the extent of the building remains. In addition, facets of the economic and commercial activities of the island during Late Antiquity are highlighted. Subjects such as the transformation/adaptation of the ancient city to new circumstances are also debated. For some lamps, analyses of the clay have been undertaken and the results are presented.

About the Author
Dr Angeliki Katsioti works for the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports at the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese, as a Head of the Department of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Sites, Monuments, Research and Museums. Her main research interests are Late Roman archaeology, as well as Byzantine art and iconography.
NEW: Autour de l’infanterie d’élite macédonienne à l’époque du royaume antigonide Cinq études militaires entre histoire, philologie et archéologie by Pierre O. Juhel. x+278 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. 373 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917326. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917333. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents five articles relating to military studies in the context of Macedonia of the Antigonids. Combining literary studies and archaeological research, the author proposes several new concepts on Hellenistic Macedonian military studies. Originally conceived as separate journal articles supporting a more general publication on the Macedonian army of Alexander the Great, it became clear it would be more useful and valuable to publish the articles together in one volume as they closely reference each other. Articles consider the Macedonian phalanx, Antigonid elite infantry, heavy infantry and defensive weaponry under the following headings: I. La nature de la phalange macédonienne ou quand la science recule; II. Antigonid Redcoats. L’infanterie d’élite de l’armée du royaume de Macédoine à l’époque hellénistique. Histoire et iconographie; III. ‘Infanterie lourde’ : une notion entre armement et ordonnance tactique; IV. Remarques philologiques et historiques sur l’ambivalence de termes relatifs aux institutions militaires macédoniennes chez les historiens de l’Antiquité; V. Deux nouvelles armes défensives de l’époque hellénistique.

French Description:
Ces cinq études militaires résultent essentiellement de développements présentés dans le manuscrit doctoral de l’auteur, L’Armée du royaume de Macédoine à l’époque hellénistique (323-148 av. J.-C.). Les troupes « nationales », présenté en Sorbonne le 11 janvier 2007. L’idée première avait été de les publier sous forme d’articles. Mais ce projet se heurtait à une difficulté. Ces textes se faisant écho, il s’avèrerait difficile d’attendre la diffusion du premier d’entre eux pour présenter les suivants tout en faisant exactement référence à un voire à plusieurs textes en cours de publication. Aussi apparut-il qu’il valait mieux les réunir en un recueil dont la cohérence serait assurée par un thème commun : l’histoire et l’archéologie militaire de l’époque hellenistique, tout particulièrement dans le cadre de la Macédoine des Antigonides.

Pierre Olivier Juhel est docteur en histoire et civilisation de l’Antiquité de l’Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV). Il est également titulaire d’une maîtrise de philosophie de l’Université Paris I (Panthéon–Sorbonne). Auteur de profession, il est spécialiste de l’histoire militaire de la fin de l’époque napoléonienne. En parallèle, dans la foulée de son doctorat consacré à l’armée macédonienne après Alexandre le Grand, il poursuit ses travaux académiques sur la Macédoine antique.
NEW: Imágenes de centauros en los vasos áticos de figuras negras y de figuras rojas Siglos VIII A.C. – IV A.C. by María Herranz. 298 pages; 15 graphs, 124 tables (all in colour). Spanish text with English summary. Available both in print and Open Access. 38 2017. ISBN 9781784916831. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The centaur, a hybrid being with the body of horse and a human head and torso, first appeared in the mountains of Thessaly. This was the Greek horse-breeding region and it seemed natural for the centaur to have originated there, in the heart of this exclusive heritage of the landed gentry. Centaurs belonged to the spheres of heroic mythology, with clear ties to the values of the aristocracy.

This book is composed of a catalogue divided into nine chapters. Each chapter comprises catalogue entries for a number of black-figure and red-figure Attic vases. The division into chapters is based on the various types of centaurs and different conflicts, either among themselves or against a hero. In addition to the catalogue is a chapter on images and statistics. Each of these nine chapters corresponds to a section of catalogue entries and statistics, as the information refers to two examples in each section, one in black figures and another in red figures. The highlighted examples illustrate the variety of different vase types (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC). The statistics are likewise divided into black and red figures, and various themes, such as the centaur Pholos and the banquet, or Herakles and Nessos. For each of these themes or groups of examples, a table is given showing the number of vases (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their place in the chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC, etc.).

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
The Mycenaean Cemetery at Agios Vasileios, Chalandritsa, in Achaea by Konstantina Aktypi with contributions by Olivia A. Jones and Vivian Staikou. xii+296 pages; 287 figures, 8 tables, 3 maps (163 plates in colour). 367 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916978. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916985. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean chamber-tomb cemetery at Agios Vasileios, near Chalandritsa in Achaea, was first investigated by Nikolaos Kyparissis in the late 1920s, followed by small-scale research in 1961 by Efthimios Mastrokostas. In the years 1989–2001 more rescue excavations were conducted by the Greek Archaeological Service, revealing 30 chamber tombs, some looted. Based mostly on the latest research, this study is the first major presentation of the cemetery and its finds. The topographical data are presented in chapter A, including the most important ancient sites in the region. Chapters B to E deal with the 45 chamber tombs and with the assemblage of the 260 artefacts found in them. The chipped stone assemblage and the ground stone implements are presented in chapter F by Vivian Staikou. Chapter G, by Olivia A. Jones, deals with the human skeletal remains, focussing on burial customs and practices. Chapters H and I handle the discussion and the concluding remarks, respectively. A series of 3D representations and photorealistic illustrations are presented, based on the original plans and architectural drawings of the tombs, to produce a visual appreciation of the important cemetery, unfortunately no longer visible.

About the Author
Konstantina Aktypi obtained her BA in Archaeology at the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and Certificates in Heritage Management, Administration, and Developing Communication Skills and Responses to Crisis. She has participated in projects of intensive archaeological survey and systematic excavations in Achaea and Aitoloakarnania. Since 1995, she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities of Achaea, conducting rescue excavations in the region dating from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman period. From 2002 to 2011 she worked at the excavations of the Mycenaean settlement and chamber tomb cemetery at Voudeni, also holding a supervisorial position for the major restoration works there. Her current research interests include the study of the chamber tombs at Voudeni, an Early Bronze Age settlement near Patras and the two best preserved tholos tombs in Achaea, in the prehistoric cemetery at Rhodia. She is also working on educational programs, introducing students to the art of Archaeology.

Olivia A. Jones obtained a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and History at West Virginia University and a Masters in Aegean Archaeology at University College London. She has worked in academic and contract archaeology projects in the United States and Greece. She is currently completing her doctoral research at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. Her research interests include applying a bioarchaeological approach to Mycenaean mortuary practices.

Vivian Staikou is an archaeologist of the Ephorate of Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. She studied Archaeology and Fine Arts in the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and received an MA in Prehistoric Archaeology from the University of Crete. Over the years she has carried out archaeological fieldwork in Attica, Achaea, Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. Her current research interests include lithic technologies, the Palaeolithic of Western Greece and the archaeology of the island of Lefkas. She also has a particular interest in developing educational programs for children.
Encounters, Excavations and Argosies Essays for Richard Hodges edited by John Mitchell, John Moreland and Bea Leal. iv+358 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 365 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916817. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916824. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Richard Hodges is one of Europe’s preeminent archaeologists. He has transformed the way we understand the early Middle Ages, and has put the past to work for the present, through a sequence of paradigmatic excavations in England, Italy and Albania. Encounters, Excavations and Argosies pays tribute to him with a series of reflections on some of the themes and issues which have been central to his work over the last forty years. The contributors are colleagues, many his students, above all friends of the man whose ideas, example, trust, and loyalty have touched and inspired us all.

About the Authors
John Mitchell first met Richard Hodges at Castel San Vincenzo in 1981, a jobbing art-historian dropping by to assess some excavated fresco-fragments, was hooked and has been working with him ever since, in Molise, southern Albania and more recently in Tuscany. He is Professor in the History of Art (emeritus) at the University of East Anglia.

John Moreland took his first Archaeology tutorial with Richard Hodges at the University of Sheffield in 1977. Richard also supervised his PhD, and they worked closely together on excavations at Roystone Grange (Derbyshire), San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), and Butrint (Albania). He is Professor of Historical Archaeology at the University of Sheffield.

Bea Leal studied metalwork at Camberwell Art College and history of art at the University of East Anglia, finishing her PhD there (on Images of Architecture in Late Antiquity) in 2016. Her interests are in the art and architecture of the late antique and early medieval Mediterranean, and especially the early Islamic period.
Bodies of Maize, Eaters of Grain Comparing material worlds, metaphor and the agency of art in the Preclassic Maya and Mycenaean early civilisations by Marcus Jan Bajema. vi+352 pages; illustrated throughout in black &white with 22 colour plates. 364 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916916. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916923. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides a comparative study of the earliest urban civilisations of the Maya lowlands and the Greek mainland. The focus lies on the art styles of the Late Preclassic lowland Maya and Mycenaean Greece. Building on research from previous comparative studies, the approach used here seeks to combine more traditional iconographic approaches with more recent models on metaphor and the social agency of things. By comparing Maya and Mycenaean art styles through the three aspects of metaphor, semiotics and praxis, their differences and similarities are made clear. The book shows art to have played a more active role in the development of the earliest urban civilisations, rather than passively reflecting economic and political trends. In that way, the social role of art provides a key to understanding the relations between the different factors in the development of the two societies, as they played out at different temporal and geographical scales. To understand this, the notion of distinct Maya and Mycenaean ‘material worlds’, involving both materials and ideas, is proposed, with consequences for models about the earliest urban civilisations in general.
Interpreting the Seventh Century BC Tradition and Innovation edited by Xenia Charalambidou and Catherine Morgan. viii+460pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 326 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915728. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915735. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book has its origin in a conference held at the British School at Athens in 2011 which aimed to explore the range of new archaeological information now available for the seventh century in Greek lands. It presents material data, combining accounts of recent discoveries (which often enable reinterpretation of older finds), regional reviews, and archaeologically focused critique of historical and art historical approaches and interpretations. The aim is to make readily accessible the material record as currently understood and to consider how it may contribute to broader critiques and new directions in research. The geographical focus is the old Greek world encompassing Macedonia and Ionia, and extending across to Sicily and southern Italy, considering also the wider trade circuits linking regional markets. The book does not aim for the pan- Mediterranean coverage of recent works: given that much of the latest innovative and critical scholarship has focused on the western Mediterranean in particular, it is necessary to bring old Greece back under the spotlight and to expose to critical scrutiny the often Athenocentric interpretative frameworks which continue to inform discussion of other parts of the Mediterranean.
Minoan Extractions: A Photographic Journey 2009-2016 Sissi Archaeological Project by Gavin McGuire. Viii+168 pages; illustrated throughout with 137 black and white photographs. Text in English and Greek. 347 2017. ISBN 9781784916367. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeologist and award-winning photographer Gavin McGuire’s involvement with the Sissi Archaeological Project, where he conducted a seven year photographic study of the Bronze Age Minoan excavations under the auspices of the Belgian School in Athens, Université Catholique de Louvain, offered an extraordinary opportunity to capture moments of human interaction during excavations as they interconnected with an ancient Minoan culture, stretching back millennia (2600-1200 BC).

With the Sissi Photography Project, at a unique coastal landscape four kilometres from Malia Palace in Crete, McGuire follows a proud photographic tradition that is now facing yet another major technological change – from digital to virtual, from handheld cameras to drones and to live excavation access. It is also the age of the smartphone – easy for anyone to use, producing high quality images that regularly engages a global general audience.

McGuire’s approach revolves around being at the right place and at the right fleeting moment, making images that highlight motion and emotion from the more than 80 ‘players’ on the archaeological stage for the excavation season during each July-August. There are images of scientists at work – archaeologists, anthropologists, technical specialists, local workmen digging (many proudly following in the wake of their forefathers) and restorers and conservators dealing with the thousands of finds housed at the apothiki or workshop.

Yet the Sissi Project encompasses not only the dig period but includes images of the site throughout the year, showing, in part, the impact of the environment.

137 black and white photographs are accompanied by a series of short essays presented in English and Greek providing an overview of the project’s photographic approach and an introduction to the long and complex relationship between archaeology and photography from their 19th century beginnings. The outcome shows that archaeological sites are not just created overnight but are the result of years of discovery, restoration and preservation. They are not just for now, but hopefully for the future. The ancient past deserves nothing less.

About the author
Gavin McGuire is a New Zealand archaeologist and award winning photographer with the Belgian School at Athens, Université catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve, excavating at Sissi, Crete. He lives in Vrachasi, Crete, with his wife, the artist, Rosemarie McGuire. He is involved in a long-term photographic study of the site, as well as a photographic project to record images of Byzantine history and local traditions of Crete. His work reflects the influences of photographers such as: Fox Talbot, Roger Frith, Flinders Petrie, John Beasly Greene, Roger Fenton, Gertrude Bell, Alison Frantz, Eugene Atget, Henri Cartier Bresson, Ansel Adams and especially Harry Burton. Gavin McGuire is a member of the Royal Photographic Society. (www.pastvirtuality.com)

Read Gavin’s article on the Archaeopress Blog, reflecting on his time spent excavating at Sissi, Crete.
Knossos and the Near East A contextual approach to imports and imitations in Early Iron Age tombs by Vyron Antoniadis. xii+170 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 14 plates in colour. 351 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916404. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916411. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this book, Dr Vyron Antoniadis presents a contextual study of the Near Eastern imports which reached Crete during the Early Iron Age and were deposited in the Knossian tombs. Cyprus, Phoenicia, North Syria and Egypt are the places of origin of these imports. Knossian workshops produced close or freer imitations of these objects. The present study reveals the ways in which imported commodities were used to create or enhance social identity in the Knossian context. The author explores the reasons that made Knossians deposit imported objects in their graves as well as investigates whether specific groups could control not only the access to these objects but also the production of their imitations. Dr Antoniadis argues that the extensive use of locally produced imitations alongside authentic imports in burial rituals and contexts indicates that Knossians treated both imports and imitations as items of the same symbolic and economic value.
Le guerrier, le chat, l’aigle, le poisson et la colonne: la voie spiralée des signes Approche sémiologique, structurale et archéologique du disque de Phaistos by Serge Collet. 90 pages; 15 tables, 1 colour illustration. French text with English Abstract and Foreword. 6 2017. ISBN 9781784916169. £14.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Phaistos Disc is one of the most studied documents of the Minoan civilization, enticing scholars and simple enthusiasts with the mysterious aura that envelops it and with its singularity among Minoan scriptures. It has entered the collective imagination, both at academic and popular levels. Representations of the Disc can be found abundantly in popular culture, from appearances in Mickey Mouse comics to a prop amidst the curios on the tables of a television magician.

It is this very overexposure that risks undermining the understanding of an object that is, first and foremost, an archaeological artefact found in a chronological and cultural context. Much has been said and much and has been written about the Disc. Collet brings a new approach. It’s not a deciphering but an interpretation, a depiction of the Minoan Weltanschauung through the symbols on the Disc and their connections with reality. This begins with the spiral-shaped construction of the inscription and its possible temporal allusions, and moves on to a structuralist view of use of the signs, and in which the repetitions take on almost ritual significance. Hence it is a pictorial interpretation rather than syllabic, whereby the pictograph is not intended as a rigid reproduction of logical discourse, but rather a path.

About the Author: Serge Collet (1950-2016) was a French scientist who became known for his interdisciplinary research on early sea-dependent societies. His main study “Uomini e Pesce, La caccia al pesce spada tra Scilla e Cariddi” as well as his publications with SAGE Publications over the years, as well as his several contributions to international conferences (inter alia funded by the EU and FAO) gave substantial examples as to what contributions maritime ethnology and archaeology can make for the preservation of cultures and the seas over the millennia.
Excavations at the Mycenaean Cemetery at Aigion – 1967 Rescue Excavations by the late Ephor of Antiquities, E. Mastrokostas by Thanasis I. Papadopoulos and Evangelia Papadopoulou-Chrysikopoulou. vi+124 pages; illustrated throughout with 26 plates in colour. 343 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916183. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916190. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this monograph the authors present the finds of four Mycenaean chamber tombs, from the rescue excavation of Ephor Mastrokostas at Aigion in 1967. Unfortunately, no diary or any other information, regarding the architecture or the burial customs, was found. However, it is highly possible that they were similar to eleven tombs which were systematically excavated by Papadopoulos in 1970. In contrast with them, the four tombs produced a much greater number of finds, indicating richer burials. Furthermore, some of these finds are unique (e.g. “thronos”-straight-sided alabastron with unusual paneled decoration), rare (e.g. askoi) and exceptional (e.g. cylindrical stirrup jars) in the Achaean Mycenaean ceramic repertory, while the total absence of terracotta figurines as well as the rarity of small objects is surprising. Taken together the excavated tombs make a total of 15, but the actual number may be greater. It is noteworthy that the material is stylistically different and generally earlier from that of western Achaea. The supplementary information, provided by this publication, strengthens the evidence that this important Achaean cemetery was used for a long time (LHII-IIIC) and that the inhabitants had connections with the Argolid as well as with other areas to the east, especially with the Dodecanese.
Kratos & Krater: Reconstructing an Athenian Protohistory by Barbara Bohen. xvi+250 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with one plate in colour. 340 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916220. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916237. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Athenian governance and culture are reconstructed from the Bronze Age into the historical era based on traditions, archaeological contexts and remains, foremost the formal commensal and libation krater. Following Mycenaean immigration from the Peloponnesos during the transitional years, changes in governance are observable. Groups under aristocratic leadership, local and immigrant, aspired to coexist under a surprisingly formal set of stipulations that should be recognized as Athens’ first constitution. Synoikismos did not refer to a political union of Attica, sometimes attributed to Theseus, but to a union of aristocratic houses (oikoi). The union replaced absolute monarchy with a new oligarchical-monarchy system, each king selected from one of the favoured aristocratic houses and ruling for life without inheritance. The system prevailed through the late eleventh to the mid-eighth c. and is corroborated by Athenian traditions cross-referenced with archaeological data from the burial grounds, and a formerly discredited list of Athenian Iron Age kings. Some burial grounds have been tentatively identified as those of the Melanthids, Alcmeonids, Philaids and Medontids, who settled the outskirts of Athens along with other migrant groups following the decline of the elite in the Peloponnesos. While the Melanthids left during the 11th c. Ionian Migration other aristocratic houses remained and contributed to the evolution of the historical era polis of Athens. One noble family, the Alcmeonids preserved their cemetery into the Archaic period in a burial record of 600 years’ duration.

Incorporated into this work is a monograph on the Athenian formal krater used by these primarily Neleid aristocratic houses in assembly and ritual. Some Homeric practices parallel those found in Athens, so the Ionic poets may have documented customs that had existed on the Mainland and were transferred to Ionia during the Ionian Migration. The demise of both the constitution and the standard, ancestral krater in Athens following a mid-eighth c. watershed is testimony to an interval of political change, as noted by Ian Morris, before the systematized establishment of annual archonship in the following century. The support this research has given to the validity of the King List has resulted in a proposed new chronology, with an earlier onset for the Geometric period at 922 BC, rather than the currently accepted 900 BC. The relative chronology of Coldstream based on style is generally accepted here, but some intermediate stages are revised based on perceptible break data, such as the onset of a new kingship, a reported war, or the demise of a governance system.

About the Author:

Barbara Bohen has a 1979 PhD in Classical Art, Archaeology and Classics from New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. From 1981 to 1997 she served as director of the University of Illinois multicultural World Heritage Museum (now Spurlock). She has taught art history, museology, and archaeological methodology, given many public lectures, and published on topics ranging from Athenian burial cult, ceramic studies, and aesthetics to a multidisciplinary study of an Egyptian mummy. Awards include Fulbright, Danforth and Getty fellowships, and a three year NDEA Title IV award for classical studies at New York University Washington Square. The University of Illinois granted the Chancellor’s Academic Professional Excellence Award, as well as an Arnold Beckman award for travel and research in Greece which helped further the genesis of the current publication. Bohen has excavated Archaic Native American site Garvies Point on Long Island, Classical Greek sites on the island of Samothrace, Kalo Podi, Aphrodisias, Turkey, and from 1972 to 1981 the Kerameikos excavations of Athens, Greece. Since 2012 Bohen has held an appointment as Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics, at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, She is currently engaged in th
Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times Η ΜΕΓΑΛΗ ΡΟΔΙΑΚΗ ΠΛΑΣΤΙΚΗ ΤΩΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΣΤΙΚΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΡΩΜΑΪΚΩΝ ΧΡΟΝΩΝ by Kalliope Bairami. xviii+864 pages; 222 plates, 23 in colour. Greek text with 19 page English summary. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915766. £80.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hellenistic society of the Rhodian metropolis, a naval aristocracy (Gabrielsen), dedicated bronze statues of their members in the sanctuaries and public buildings and used marble and -occasionally-lartios lithos to carve portrait-statues originally for funerary use and in a later period also for honorific purposes, figures of deities and decorative sculpture for the houses and the parks. The artists, local and itinerant, from Athens, the islands and the Asia Minor, established artistic workshops on Rhodes, some of them active for three centuries and for more than one generation. The impact of Rhodian art is evident on the islands of the Aegean and the cities of Asia Minor, due to the expansion of the Rhodian Peraia. Together with Pergamon, Rhodes emerges as a productive artistic centre of the Hellenistic era, creating statuary types and combining them with landscape elements. The radiance of its art is evident in the late Hellenistic period in Rome, the new capital of the world, where the Rhodian artists create mythological statuary groups set in grottoes.

This volume presents the large-scale Rhodian sculpture of the Hellenistic and Roman period through the publication of sixty unpublished sculptures of life size or larger than life size, together with forty-five sculptures already published. The sculptures are grouped according to their statuary type (gods, mortals and portraits), while those unable to be firmly identified due to their fragmentary condition are grouped under the category ‘uncertain identification’. The presentation of the sculptures is further supplemented by a technical description and an analysis of stylistic characteristics according to chronological development. Excavation data, wherever available, are also provided.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Greek Art: From Oxford to Portugal and Back Again by Rui Morais. vi+58 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 330 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915865. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915872. £15.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

One of the most fascinating topics in the study of ancient art concerns artistic practices and models and the means of transmission of iconographic designs and decorative compositions. This phenomenon, although well known, has not drawn much attention of scholars of the ancient art. Apart from copies of originals, the practice dates back to the first civilizations and may be even older. The media used could be painted vignettes on papyri, paint on leather, or sketches painted on ostraca, used as pattern books.

This issue is practically unheard of regarding ancient Greece, although a few media have been found which may have facilitated the transmission of iconographic designs and decorative compositions. In this study we present some examples that suggest the existence of pattern books in the Greek world.

If the media used in the Greek world are insofar unknown, the same cannot be said of the Roman world. Written sources mention the existence of manuals in the form of papyrus scrolls (stemmata, imagines) which served as models as well as inspiration for the artists.

About the author:
Rui Manuel Lopes de Sousa Morais was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in history from the University of Coimbra, MA in Urban Archaeology, PhD in archaeology, technology and materials, both from the University of Minho, Braga. He was a professor at Minho University until 2013 and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Rui has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is also a researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH) where he has developed his interest in classical art with several books published. He is a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for the classical antiquities, member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project, and the coordinator of the monographic series Classica Instrumenta from Coimbra University.
The Death of the Maiden in Classical Athens Ο ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ ΤΗΣ ΑΓΑΜΟΥ ΚΟΡΗΣ ΣΤΗΝ ΑΘΗΝΑ ΤΩΝ ΚΛΑΣΙΚΩΝ ΧΡΟΝΩΝ by Katia Margariti. xlviii+636 pages; 105 plates in colour and black & white. Text in Greek with extensive 63 page english summary. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915469. £80.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The present study examines the death of maidens in classical Athens, combining the study of Attic funerary iconography with research on classical Attic maiden burials, funerary inscriptions, tragic plays, as well as the relevant Attic myths.

The iconography of funerary reliefs focuses on the idealized image of the deceased maiden, as well as the powerful bonds of love and kinship that unite her with the members of her family, whereas the iconography of vases emphasizes the premature death of the maiden, the pain of loss and mourning felt by her family, as well as the observance of the indispensable funerary rites concerning her burial and ‘tomb cult’. Particularly interesting is the fact that the ‘traditional’ theory according to which the loutrophoros marked the graves of the unmarried dead alone has been proven non valid.

The study of classical Attic maiden burials indicates that the prematurely dead maidens were buried as children who didn’t live long enough to reach adulthood.

The untimely death of maidens in Attic drama and mythology is beneficial to the family or the city. In great contrast to that, the premature death of real - life Athenian maidens was a terrible disaster for the girls’ families, as well as the polis itself. Despite this, the iconography of dead maidens in classical Athens is in accordance with the ‘image’ of the deceased maidens presented by funerary epigrams, tragedy, and mythology. It has to be noted though, that the same is not true in the case of maiden burials.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Artemis and Her Cult by Ruth M. Léger. vi+178 pages; thirteen colour plates. 316 2017. ISBN 9781784915506. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Greek sanctuaries are among the best known archaeological sites in ancient Greece. However, after over 150 years of excavations and research we know surprisingly little about some of their aspects, such as the rituals enacted in the sanctuary, the nature of original local deities and how aspects of their character were assimilated into those of the Olympians, why sanctuaries were established in certain places, and how to determine who the sanctuary was established for when no epigraphical material is present.

Artemis and Her Cult provides a first attempt to bring together archaeological and literary sources from two main Artemis sanctuaries, hoping to contribute to a clearer picture of her cult. An account of Artemis’ different characters describes her as a mother of gods, a goddess of wilderness, animals and hunt; a goddess of birth, infants and children (and young animals); as well as a goddess of youth and marriage and rites of passage.

These descriptions are followed by an up-to-date account of the archaeological record of the sanctuaries of Artemis Orthia at Sparta and Artemis Ephesia at Ephesus. For the comparison the site of Athena Alea at Tegea is examined. The three accounts offer a full study of the architectural development and the range of artefacts made of different materials. The varied character is Artemis are further analysed by looking at the archaeology relating to the cult and the rites of passage taking place at the sites. The rites of passage are reconstructed by using the literary accounts.

About the author:
Ruth Léger's love for ancient culture started with the subjects of Latin and Greek at secondary school. After a BA and MA degrees at the Universiteit Utrecht, she moved to Birmingham to pursue her PhD. This book is the result of her research in the Department of Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology under supervision of Dr K.A. Wardle, and is a starting point for mapping out sanctuaries and their history throughout the Greek world.
Stone Carving of the Hospitaller Period in Rhodes: Displaced pieces and fragments by Anna-Maria Kasdagli. ii+212 pages; illustrated through in black & white with 1 colour plate. 287 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914783. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914790. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The work presents 230 stone carvings of the Hospitaller period in Rhodes (1309-1522), which for various reasons are no longer in their original setting. Most of them are cut in local stone or reused antique marble and belong to three broad groups: decorative architectural elements, funerary slabs and markers, and heraldry from secular and religious buildings and fortifications.

Their architectural, artistic, inscriptional and social significance are discussed, providing insights into the way cultural influences from different parts of Western Europe were introduced, maintained and adapted in an Eastern Mediterranean context by the Knights of Saint John, other Westerners the presence of the Order encouraged to travel to Rhodes and even live there and, occasionally, by wealthy Greeks. The study includes a full catalogue and touches upon recent archaeological activity in the historic centre of the town of Rhodes.
The Black Sea in the Light of New Archaeological Data and Theoretical Approaches Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on the Black Sea in Antiquity held in Thessaloniki, 18-20 September 2015 edited by Manolis Manoledakis. viii+290 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 301 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915100. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915117. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Black Sea in the Light of New Archaeological Data and Theoretical Approaches contains 19 papers on the archaeology and ancient history of the Black Sea region, covering a vast period of time, from the Early Iron Age until the Late Roman – Early Byzantine Periods. The majority of papers present archaeological material that has come to light during the last few years, in excavations that have been taking place in several parts of Pontus. Additionally, there are papers that present theoretical approaches to historical issues concerning the Black Sea, its local peoples, cultural aspects or specific sites, while at the end there is as well as a section on the connections between the Black Sea and northern Greece. Thus, the reader of this volume will have the opportunity to be informed about new archaeological results from excavators of some very important Black Sea sites, focus on specific categories of excavation finds or constructions, but also encounter new theories and ideas about social aspects of life in the Black Sea in ancient times. All these indicate once again the impressive acceleration of the archaeological and historical research that is being conducted in the last few decades in the Black Sea littoral, which continues to attract the unfailing interest of scholars from around the world.

About the author: Manolis Manoledakis is Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology at the International Hellenic University in Thessaloniki. He has also taught at the University of Ioannina, the Democritus University of Thrace and the Hellenic Open University. He has participated in various research programmes and is the director of the International Hellenic University’s excavation in Neo Rysio, Thessaloniki. His research work concentrates on the archaeology and ancient history of the Black Sea as well as central Macedonia, ancient topography and geography of these areas, ancient Greek religion, Greek mythology in its historical context, and ancient Greek painting and vase-painting. He is the director of the two post-graduate programmes of the International Hellenic University’s School of Humanities, the MA in Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies and the MA in the Classical Archaeology and the Ancient History of Macedonia, funded by the Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation. Every three years he organizes the International Workshop on the Black Sea in Antiquity at the International Hellenic University.
Social Identity and Status in the Classical and Hellenistic Northern Peloponnese The Evidence from Burials by Nikolas Dimakis. x+358 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 4 colour plates. 299 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915063. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915070. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Classical and Hellenistic cemeteries can give us more than descriptions and styles of pottery, art and burial architecture; they can speak of people, societies, social conventions as well as of social distinctions. This book aims to employ and illustrate the unique strengths of burial evidence and its contribution to the understanding of social identity and status in the Classical and Hellenistic Northern Peloponnese. By thoroughly reviewing published burials from the regions of Achaia, Arcadia, the Argolid and Cynouria, Corinthia, Elis and Triphylia, spatial and temporal variations which led to a change in definitions of ‘society’ and perceptions of ‘community’ on the basis of shifting reactions to death and the dead are demonstrated. Social roles of men, women, children, elite and non-elite individuals as expressed or negotiated in the mortuary record are explored. Preconceived ideas and stereotypes within and about the Classical and Hellenistic burials are challenged. In spite of the many constraints imposed by the limited previous research, what clearly emerges from this study is the wide degree of variation in what are often loosely termed ‘customary’ or unappealing Classical and Hellenistic burial practices in the Northern Peloponnese. If death was indeed an occasion or ‘opportunity’, then the meaning of this opportunity varied along the shifting dimensions, in time and space, of identity and status.

About the Author: Dr Nikolas Dimakis is a RCH Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. His research on ‘The Archaeology of Child Death: child burials in Classical and Hellenistic Attica’, funded by the Research Centre for the Humanities, examines the interplay of identity, status and emotions within the context of child burials in Attica. He is also a Research Associate inw the ‘THALES – University of Athens – Apollo’s Sanctuary at ancient Halasarna on Kos’ project of excellence. Nikolas received a thorough classical education at the University of Athens, and further pursued postgraduate studies at the University of Nottingham where he obtained his PhD, on prestigious studentships and awards. He has published on Classical and Hellenistic burial customs, deathscapes and terracotta lamps. He has coordinated and participated in international meetings and in many archaeological projects in the Peloponnese, Attica and the Dodecanese.
Epigraphy of Art Ancient Greek Vase-Inscriptions and Vase-Paintings by Dimitrios Yatromanolakis. x+206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 298 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914868. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914875. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ancient Greek vase-paintings offer broad-ranging and unprecedented early perspectives on the often intricate interplay of images and texts. By bringing together—for the first time in English-language scholarship—an international group of leading scholars in classical art and archaeology who have worked on vase-inscriptions, this book investigates epigraphic technicalities of Attic and non-Attic inscriptions on pottery as well as their broader iconographic and sociocultural significance. The ten chapters in this book propose original and expert methodological approaches to the study of vase-inscriptions and vasepaintings, while also foregrounding the outstanding but not fully examined importance of the area of vase-inscriptions for current research on ancient Greek visual representations. Epigraphy of Art: Ancient Greek Vase-Inscriptions and Vase-Paintings constitutes a major contribution to the fields of Greek epigraphy and classical art and archaeology and will prove significant for epigraphists, archaeologists, and art-historians interested in the complexities of the interaction of art and text.
Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 2 2017 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). 2 2017. ISBN JGAVOL22017. Book contents pageBuy Now

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Editorial: Volume 1 (John Bintliff)

Prehistory and Proto-History
New insights into the Upper Pleistocene archaeology of Northwestern Greece: The evidence from three open-air sites and its implication for Middle and Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers’ activity and behaviour in Southeastern Europe (S. Ligkovanlis)

Preserving memory in Minoan CreteFilled-in bench and platform deposits from the First Palace of Phaistos (Ilaria Calo)

Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 1 2016 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). xiv+212 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available in print and Open Access. 1 2016. ISBN 2399-1844-1-2016. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

ISSN 2399-1844 (Print)
ISSN 2399-1852 (online)

Table of Contents:
A Fill from a Potter’s Dump at Morgantina – by Shelley Stone
Trade in Pottery within the Lower Adriatic in the 2nd century BCE – by Carlo De Mitri
Hellenistic Ash Containers from Phoinike (Albania) – by Nadia Aleotti
Pottery Production in Hellenistic Chalkis, Euboea. Preliminary Notes – by Yannis Chairetakis
A Terracotta Figurine of a War Elephant and Other Finds from a Grave at Thessaloniki – by Eleni Lambrothanassi & Annareta Touloumtzidou
Moldmade Bowls from Straton’s Tower (Caesarea Maritima) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom
Greco-Roman Jewellery from the Necropolis of Qasrawet (Sinai) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS
Panathenaic Amphorae of Hellenistic and Roman Times – by Martin Streicher

BOOK REVIEWS
Shelley C. Stone, Morgantina Studies 6. The Hellenistic and Roman Fine Wares – by Peter J. Stone
Pia Guldager Bilde & Mark L. Lawall (eds.), Pottery, Peoples and Places, BSS 16 – by Kathleen Warner Slane
Susan I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery. The Plain Wares, Agora 33 – by Patricia Kögler

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Complete eJournal available to download now in Open Access - click here to follow the link
Le décor architectural artuqide en pierre de Mardin placé dans son contexte regional: contribution à l’histoire du décor géométrique et végétal du Proche-Orient des XIIe-XVe siècles by Deniz Beyazit. xx+552 pages; illustrated throughout with 302 colour plates. French text. 285 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911225. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911232. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Artuqids were one of the successor dynasties that rose to power in the aftermath of the eleventh-twelfth century invasion of Western and Central Asia by the Seljuq Turks. While the political power of the Artuqids was limited to the Diyar Bakr, a small region in northern Jazira corresponding to Southeastern Turkey, their artistic legacy is noteworthy. The many surviving Artuqid monuments, built over three hundred years (early 12th – early 15th century), and their decoration exemplify the mastery of stone carving which is reflected in intricate designs and motifs. Mardin, alongside other Artuqid centers such as Amid, Mayyafariqin and Hisn Kayfa, was set within a larger zone of diverse Christian and Islamic artistic traditions.

This book defines Mardin’s artistic context in relation to the other Artuqid centers, as well as the neighboring zones that encompass Anatolia, the Caucasus, Iran, Iraq, Syria and Egypt. During the Artuqid period an original style developed in Mardin and the Diyar Bakr, which itself was rooted in a well-established local school of stone carving. Connected with Christian traditions found in the Syriac Tur ‘Abdin and in Late Antique Syria, the decoration also compares with that of monuments in Armenia and Georgia, and resonates with artistic practices seen in areas controlled by the regional Muslim powers of the time: the Zangids, Ayyubids, Mameluks, Great and Anatolian Seljuqs and the Ilkhanids. The Artuqid buildings reflect the spirit of the time, when the Jazira served as an artistic platform, fostering the circulation of ideas that led to new inspiration, and open-minded rulers and patrons, curious and receptive to new creations, stimulated the creative efforts of architects, stone carvers and craftsmen. The decorated monuments also attest to the existence of significant economic wealth and the need to commission sophisticated buildings that magnified the political and social status of the ruling elite’s.

French description:
Les Artuqides comptaient parmi les nombreuses dynasties successeurs (« successor states ») qui sont arrivées simultanément au pouvoir à la suite de l’invasion des Turcs Seljuqides dont les armées avaient conquis, au cours des XIe et XIIe siècles, de vastes territoires s’étendant des limites de la Chine occidentale à la Méditerranée orientale. Bien que le pouvoir politique des Artuqides fût limité à une petite région, le Diyar Bakr – au nord de la Jazira correspondant à la Turquie du sud-est – l’héritage artistique qu’ils ont légué est pourtant remarquable. Les nombreux monuments artuqides et leur décor architectural, créés sur une période de trois siècles (du début du XIIe au début du XVe siècle), témoignent de la maîtrise de la sculpture et de la taille de pierre qui se reflète dans des motifs et compositions complexes. Mardin, à l’instar des autres centres artuqides d’Amid, Mayyafariqin et Hisn Kayfa, se situe dans une zone englobant diverses traditions artistiques chrétiennes et musulmanes.

Ce livre détermine le contexte artistique de Mardin par rapport aux autres centres artuqides, ainsi qu’aux zones voisines comprenant l’Anatolie, le Caucase, l’Iran, l’Iraq, la Syrie et l’Egypte. Durant la période artuqide, un style original se développe à Mardin ainsi qu’au Diyar Bakr. Ce style puise lui-même sa source dans une école locale bien établie de tailleur de pierre. Bien qu’étant liée aux précédentes traditions chrétiennes du Tur ‘Abdin syriaque et à la Syrie de l’Antiquité tardive, la décoration se compare également avec les monuments de l’Arménie et de la Géorgie, et résonne avec les traditions artistiques observées dans les régions contrôlées par les pouvoirs régionaux musulmans de l’époque : les Zangides, Ayyubides, Mamelukes, Grands Seldjuqides, Seldjuqides d’Anatolie et les Ilkhanides. Les monuments artuqides reflètent l’esprit d’une époque durant laquelle la Jazira était une sorte de plateforme artistique qui favorisait la circul
Archeologia dell’acqua a Gortina di Creta in età protobizantina by Elisabetta Giorgi. x+288 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English abstracts for each chapter. Available both in print and Open Access. Limina/Limites: Archaeologies, histories, islands and borders in the Mediterranean (365-1556) 5. ISBN 9781784914448. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Ancient aqueducts have long commanded the attention of archaeologists, both for their intrinsic, monumental importance and for their significance as infrastructures closely related to the concept of civilisation. An aqueduct, in fact, is an artefact that has a great potential for providing information concerning at least two major aspects of ancient society: those relating to structural, technical, and engineering matters, and those relating to building and construction technology. These topics have enjoyed considerable attention in past studies, and in recent years they have also been integrated with a multi-disciplinary and contextual approach. They have further increased the potential of the analysis of ancient hydraulic systems, turning them into historical subjects capable of expanding our knowledge of the urban and social transformation of ancient cities and their territories.

The current study of the early Byzantine aqueduct of Gortyn (Crete) follows this tradition, but starts from a viewpoint related not so much to the aqueduct itself, as to a series of questions about the city: what was the appearance of Gortyn in the early Byzantine era? How did the inhabitants live? Where did they live and what did they do for living?

The aqueduct was born with the Roman city and accompanied it for its entire lifetime, constituting the backbone around which the various forms of urban settlement were redrawn at each major historical stage. Its vital link with everyday life makes the aqueduct a key witness for the study of the transformations of the city over the long term.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

CAMERA KALAUREIA An Archaeological Photo-Ethnography | Μια αρχαιολογική φωτο-εθνογραφία by Yannis Hamilakis & Fotis Ifantidis. Paperback edition: 170 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. Full text in English and Greek. Available both in print and Open Access. 259 2016. ISBN 9781784914127. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

How can we find alternative, sensorially rich and affective ways of engaging with the material past in the present?

How can photography play a central role in archaeological narratives, beyond representation and documentation?

This photo-book engages with these questions, not through conventional academic discourse but through evocative creative practice. The book is, at the same time, a site guide of sorts: a photographic guide to the archaeological site of the Sanctuary of Poseidon in Kalaureia, on the island of Poros, in Greece.

Ancient and not-so-ancient stones, pine trees that were “wounded” for their resin, people who lived amongst the classical ruins, and the tensions and the clashes with the archaeological apparatus and its regulations, all become palpable, affectively close and immediate.

Furthermore, the book constitutes an indirect but concrete proposal for the adoption of archaeological photo-ethnography as a research as well as public communication tool for critical heritage studies, today.

Also available in hardback; click here to purchase hardback edition priced £55.00.

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Achaios: Studies presented to Professor Thanasis I. Papadopoulos edited by Evangelia Papadopoulou-Chrysikopoulou, Vassilis Chrysikopoulos, Gioulika Christakopoulou. xx+280 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 2 colour plates. 261 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913410. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913427. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In a career spanning more than forty years Prof. Thanasis I. Papadopoulos exhibited his intensive devotion to the Bronze Age of Greece, and especially to Mycenaean Achaea (his native land), through his excavations, publications and lessons to innumerable students in Greece and abroad. The origins, as well as the interconnections of the Mycenaeans with other civilizations, were always of great interest to Prof. Papadopoulos. This honorary volume expands to diverse eras, from Neolithic to Byzantine times, following Mycenaean paths that lead even to the distant East: to Egypt, whose culture Prof. Papadopoulos taught for many years at Ioannina University, and to Jordan, where he excavated for more than 10 years.

In Achaios, thirty-five scholars from six different countries have contributed with thirty-one papers, as a small token of appreciation, gratitude and affection to a true scholar, who devoted his life studying and revealing the long journeys of the Mycenaeans and their culture, but also, to a passionate professor who, by transmitting his scientific knowledge, left an invaluable legacy for future generations.