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NEW: A Classical Archaeologist’s Life: The Story so Far An Autobiography by John Boardman. Paperback; 156x234mm; 271 pages; 43 illustrated plates, 28 in colour. (RRP: £25.00). 656 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693430. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693447. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A Classical Archaeologists’s Life: The Story so Far shows that a scholar’s life is not all scholarship, though much of this book is devoted to the writing of books and, especially, travel to classical and other lands. Boardman is a Londoner, born in Ilford and attending school in Essex (Chigwell). His teenage years were spent often in air raid shelters rather than with ‘mates‘ (all evacuated). There are distinctive ‘aunties’, the rituals of daily life in a London suburb. The non-scholarly figures live large in this account of his life, marriage, children, new houses. At Cambridge he learned about classical archaeology as a necessary addition to reading Homer and Demosthenes, even being obliged to recite the latter. And those were the days of Bertrand Russell’s lectures in a university reawakening after the war. Thence to the British School at Athens to learn about excavation (Smyrna, Knossos, later Libya). His return from Greece was to Oxford, not Cambridge, at first in the Ashmolean Museum, then as Reader and Professor. A spell in New York gives an account of the city before the troubles, when Petula Clark’s Down Town was dominant. There is much here to reflect on university life and teaching, and on the reasons for and problems with the writing of his many books (some 40), with reflection on the university, colleges and their ways. Travels are well documented – a notable trip through Pakistan and China, in Persia, Egypt, Turkey – with comment on what he saw and experienced beyond archaeology. A lecture tour in Australia provides comment beyond the academic. He visited Israel often, lecturing and publishing for the Bible Lands Museum. Several tours in the USA took him to most of their museums and universities as well many other sights, from glaciers to alligators.

This book is a mixture of scholarly reminiscence, reflection on family life, travelogue, and critique of classical scholarship (not all archaeological) worldwide, illustrated with pictures of travels, friends, home life, and, for a historian, a reflection on experiences of over 90 years.

About the Author
Sir John Boardman is one of the foremost experts on ancient Greek art. Having served as Assistant Director of the British School at Athens (1952-1955), he was Assistant Keeper at the Ashmolean Museum and later Lincoln Professor of Classical Archaeology and Art at the University of Oxford (1978-1994). He continues to work in Oxford, at the Classical Art Research Centre, where he is mainly preoccupied with the study of ancient gems.
NEW: Αthens and Attica in Prehistory: Proceedings of the International Conference, Athens, 27–31 May 2015 edited by Nikolas Papadimitriou, James C. Wright, Sylvian Fachard, Naya Polychronakou-Sgouritsa and Eleni Andrikou. Hardback; 698 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (273 colour plates). Papers in English (with Greek abstracts) or Greek (with English abstracts). 655 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696714. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696721. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The numerous rescue excavations conducted in Athens and Attica by the Archaeological Service during and after the major construction projects of the 2004 Olympic Games brought to light significant new prehistoric finds which have transformed our understanding of the region in prehistory. However, despite their importance, the new discoveries had remained mostly unnoticed by the international community, as the results were scattered in various publications, and no synthesis was ever attempted. The goal of the 2015 international conference Athens and Attica in Prehistory, which was organized by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, the University of Athens (Department of Archaeology and History of Art), the Museum of Cycladic Art and the Ephorate of Antiquites of East Attica (Hellenic Ministry of Culture) was to gather scholars working in the region and present for the first time a survey of Attic prehistory which would include the most recent discoveries and integrate over a century of scholarship. The 668- page conference proceedings include over 66 papers in Greek and English with sections dedicated to topography, the palaeo-environment, the Neolithic, the Chalcolithic transition, the Early Bronze Age, the Middle and Late Bronze Age, as well as the contacts between Attica and its neighbouring regions. A series of new detailed maps, derived from an exhaustive GIS-related database, provide the most up to date topographical and archaeological survey of Prehistoric Attica. Athens and Attica in Prehistory provides the most complete overview of the region from the Neolithic to the end of the Late Bronze Age. Its importance goes beyond the field of Aegean prehistory, as it paves the way for a new understanding of Attica in the Early Iron Age and indirectly throws new light on the origins of what will later become the polis of the Athenians.

About the Editors
Nikolas Papadimitriou is a Research Associate and Lecturer at the Institute of Classical Archaeology, University of Heidelberg. Specializing in the prehistory and early history of Attica, death practices in the Bronze Age Aegean, Mediterranean interconnections, and the study of ancient craftsmanship, he currently co-directs research projects on prehistoric Marathon and Thorikos.

James C. Wright holds the William R. Kenan, Jr. Chair and is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania. He is currently director of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project and co-director of the University of Toronto Excavations at Kommos, both in Greece.

Sylvian Fachard, the former A. W. Mellon Professor of Classical Studies at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (2017–2020), is currently Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. He is the co-director of the Mazi Archaeological Project in Attica.

Naya Sgouritsa, Professor Emerita of Archaeology at the University of Athens, specializes in Mycenaean Archaeology. Since 2002, she has been director of the Lazarides excavations on the island of Aegina. Her main research interests focus on Mycenaean Attica, Late Bronze Age cemeteries and burial practices, pottery, and figurines.

Eleni Andrikou is the Head of the Ephorate of Antiquities of East Attica, Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports. She excavated at Arkhanes (Crete), and conducted numerous excavations in Thebes and Khaironeia (Boeotia), as well as in the Mesogeia and Laurion areas (Attica).
NEW: Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos Studien zur Typologie, Provenienz und Herstellungstechnik von so genannter Weißgrundiger Ware, Applikenkeramik und Pergamenischer Sigillata by Asuman Lätzer-Lasar. Paperback; 314 pages; 18 figures, 4 tables plus 64 plates (74 colour pages). German text. 643 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696097. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696103. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos is the first comparative study of three ceramic ware groups, namely Appliqué Ware, White-grounded ware and Pergamene Sigillata, which appear in Ephesos (on the Aegean coast of modern day Turkey) but, until now, were considered to be products made in and imported from Pergamon; one ware group was even named after the city. However, using intensive archaeometrical analysis tools, such as thin-section and microscopy, this study seeks to demonstrate that most of the ceramic objects were produced locally. Futhermore, the book presents stunning new data that showing the very differing technical knowledge among the ancient potters of Western Asia Minor. Emerging out of the archaeometrical analyses, the book provides a list of concrete parameters for the identification of provenance in the field. Furthermore, this study encompasses the first typochronology for the three ware groups, which allows future excavations in the wider region to set up a fine chronology of their contexts based on ceramic evidences.

Asuman Lätzer-Lasar is currently a research associate at the Max Weber Centre for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies at the University of Erfurt. At the same time, she is also a member of the DFG-Center for Advanced Studies ‘Religion and Urbanity. Reciprocal transformations’. Previously, she has been the Assistant Director of the International Center for Advanced Studies Morphomata at the University of Cologne, where she also graduated in Archaeology of the Roman Provinces, Classical Archaeology and Ancient Sinology. Her PhD-project was financed by the a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School of the University of Cologne.

German Description:
Mit Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos konnten vorherige Annahmen in der Forschungsgeschichte zu der Herkunft der drei Warengruppen namens Applikenkeramik, Weißgrundige Ware und Pergamenische Sigillata, die als Importe aus Pergamon gehalten wurden, anhand von archäometrischen Analysen widerlegt und als lokal gefertigte Produkte identifiziert werden. Neben der archäometrischen Provenienzbestimmung wurden neue Erkenntnisse über das technologische Wissen der antiken Töpfer und zur Arbeitsorganisation in Werkstätten präsentiert. Die Auflistung von Unterscheidungsparametern bei Fabricuntersuchungen, sowie die Typochronologie liefern eine Grundlage für zukünftige Auswertungen von Fundkontexten des westlichen Kleinasiens während des Hellenismus und der frühen Kaiserzeit.

Asuman Lätzer-Lasar ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien der Universität Erfurt. Gleichzeitig ist sie Mitglied bei der DFGKollegforschungsgruppe „Religion und Urbanität: Wechselseitige Formierungen“ (FOR 2779). Zuvor war sie Geschäftsführerin beim Internationalen Kolleg Morphomata der Universität zu Köln. Sie studierte Provinzialrömische Archäologie, Klassische Archäologie und Ältere Sinologie an der Universität zu Köln und der Tamkang University in Danshui/Taiwan. Ihre Promotion wurde von der a.r.t.e.s. Graduiertenschule mit einem Vollstipendium finanziert.
NEW: Ephyra-Epirus: The Mycenaean Acropolis Results of the Excavations 1975-1986 and 2007-2008 edited by Thanasis I. Papadopoulos and Evangelia Papadopoulou. Paperback; 205x290mm; 140 pages; 156 figures, 7 tables. 602 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693713. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693720. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ephyra-Epirus: The Mycenaean Acropolis presents the results of the 1975-1986 and 2007-2008 excavations on the prehistoric-Mycenaean acropolis of Ephyra, one of the most important Bronze Age sites of Epirus. Ephyra is a small coastal fortified site in the region of the lower Acheron valley and the only one that has been systematically excavated, producing impressive and, in some cases, unique Bronze Age remains (architectural, burial, pottery, artefacts). It stands on a high hill, in an exceptional position that overlooks and commands the lower Acheron valley and provides easy access both to the nearby Glykis Limin, the Ionian sea and the hinterland. Moreover, it is surrounded by three successive perivoloi, two of which (middle and lower) belong to LH III times, with a monumental south entrance gate.

Ephyra fits the criteria of a major fortified settlement, as it covers an important and strategic prehistoric citadel, cemetery, residence and port of call for those travelling to the West. Strictly based on the archaeological data presented, this study suggests that the acropolis had a permanent Mycenaean population during the entire LH III period and continued to thrive after the collapse of Mycenaean centres until (and including) the Archaic period. Finally, it is tempting to suggest a correlation of the archaeological record with the Homeric tradition (Homeric Εφύρα, Od.a..259,b.238).

About the Editors
Thanasis J. Papadopoulos obtained his PhD in Aegean Prehistoric Archaeology at Bedford College, University of London in 1972. He has worked at the University of Ioannina, the University of Crete and Ionian University as epimeletes, lecturer, associate professor, visiting professor and full professor, teaching Aegean Prehistoric, Cypriot, Egyptian and Neareastern Archaeology.

Evangelia Papadopoulou is an archaeologist with a PhD in Prehistoric Archaeology from the University of Ioannina, Greece. Since 1996, she has been an active member of excavations at Patras, S.Olynthus at Halkidiki, Dodoni, Ithaca and Jordan, overseeing archaeological research and educating students on excavation techniques.
NEW: Un sistema per la gestione dell’affidabilità e dell’interpretazione dei dati archeologici Percezione e potenzialità degli small finds: il caso studio di Festòs e Haghia Triada by Marianna Figuera. Paperback; 148x210mm; 165pp; 32 figures. Italian text with English abstract. RRP: £30.00. 8 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696639. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696646. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Un sistema per la gestione dell’affidabilità e dell’interpretazione dei dati archeologici aims to identify the methodological problems associated with digitalized management of archaeological data and to introduce viable solutions that embrace interpretative aspects and the reliability concept. The work develops into a prototype system that manages the data regarding what are referred to as small finds dating back to the palatial periods from the Cretan sites of Phaistos and Ayia Triada which have been studied by the Italian Archaeological Mission since the early 20th century. The analysis of the data highlighted the value of this system and its ability to adapt to the needs of the archaeologist. It provides tools capable of assisting and implementing the interpretation of archaeological data well outside the findings and sites specific to this project for the management of other categories of archaeological finds and of any context. The book can furnish practical and theoretical contributions capable of feeding the methodological debate inherent in issues such as the treatment of sources, legacy data, reuse, the management of uncertainty, and of the rational and intuitive variables inherent in archaeological work, as well as the assessment of the reliability of an interpretative event.

Marianna Figuera is an archaeologist with a Doctorate in Cultural Heritage Studies. Currently a research fellow at the University of Catania, her research focuses on the perception of small finds, metallurgy in Minoan Crete, and the management, integrity, and reliability of digitalized archaeological data. She has been part of the Italian Archaeological Mission at Phaistos and Ayia Triada since 2010.
NEW: Henry Hunter Calvert’s Collection of Amphora Stamps and that of Sidney Smith Saunders by Alan Johnston. Paperback; 175x245mm; 118 pages; illustrated catalogue, 5 plates. 634 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696431. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696448. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Henry Hunter Calvert died at his family house at Çannakale in 1880 a few months after escaping from the rioting in Alexandria where he was British consul. The consulate was sacked and his collections destroyed. He had however sent an annotated list of his Greek amphora stamps to the British Museum, presumably to Charles Newton, with whom he and his brother Frank had frequent correspondence. This list was forgotten until the present writer ‘found’ it in a box-file in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities (its title at the time). Henry Hunter Calvert’s Collection of Amphora Stamps and that of Sidney Smith Saunders publicly presents that material.

About the Author
Alan Johnston is Emeritus Reader in Classical Archaeology at University College London. He has published widely on Greek archaeology, notably ceramics and epigraphy, having contributed to excavation reports from Aigina, Antikythera, Gravisca, Kition, Kommos and Kythera. Recently he has been working at the British Museum with the Naukratis Project team and on a catalogue of amphora stamps in the collection, and this publication is an offshoot of that work.

Table of Contents
Introduction ;

Catalogue ;
Baetica ;
Brindisi ;
Thasos ;
Chios ;
Kos ;
Knidos ;
Rhodes ;
Pamphylia ;
Egypt ;

Comment ;
Kos and Knidos ;
Rhodes ;
Unprovenanced ;

Index of names ;
Rhodian seconday stamps ;

Symbols (Rhodian unless otherwise stated) ;

Plates ;

Bibliography
NEW: Aristotle’s Μετεωρολογικά: Meteorology Then and Now by Anastasios A. Tsonis and Christos Zerefos. Hardback; 175x245mm; 126pp; 34 figures (17 in colour). 631 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696370. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696387. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Aristotle’s Μετεωρολογικά concentrates on the meteorological aspects of Aristotle’s work published as Meteorologica (Μετεωρολογικά or Meteorology) books A-D, and on how they compare now with our understanding of meteorology and climate change. In other words, how well did Aristotle fair when he tried to explain weather 2,300 years ago when there was only logic, eye observation, and past experience, with only primitive instrumentation and a few personalized measurements? While there are scientific issues behind Aristotle’s writings, this book is written for the non-specialist. The book uses simple examples to present its case, which will be easily followed by general readers.

About the Author
Anastasios Tsonis is an Emeritus Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) and an Adjunct Research Scientist at the Hydrologic Research Center in San Diego, CA. His research interests include Chaos theory, Climate dynamics, and Networks. He is the author of more than 135 peer reviewed scientific publications and he has been invited speaker in numerous conferences. He is also the author of nine books.

Christos Zerefos is Head of the Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens, Professor of Atmospheric Physics at the Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki, and Visiting Professor at the Universities of Boston, Minnesota and Oslo. He is State Representative for Climate Change for Greece. He has published numerous scientific papers and books in the fields of atmospheric physics and climatology.
PRE-ORDER: Lost Worlds of Ancient and Modern Greece Gilbert Bagnani: The Adventures of a Young Italian Archaeologist in Greece, 1921-1924 by Ian Begg. Hardback; 380pp; 14 figures; 5 maps. 604 2020 Archaeological Lives . ISBN 9781789694529. Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is forthcoming in Spring 2020. Click here to download the pre-order form and save 20%

By day, young Gilbert Bagnani studied archaeology in Greece, but by night he socialised with the elite of Athenian society. Secretly writing for the Morning Post in London, he witnessed both antebellum Athens in 1921 and the catastrophic collapse of Christian civilisation in western Anatolia in 1922. While there have been many accounts by refugees of the disastrous flight from Smyrna, few have been written from the perspective of the west side of the Aegean. The flood of a million refugees to Greece brought in its wake a military coup in Athens, the exile of the Greek royal family and the execution or imprisonment of politicians, whom Gilbert knew.

Gilbert’s weekly letters to his mother in Rome reveal his Odyssey-like adventures on a voyage of discovery through the origins of western civilisation. As an archaeologist in Greece, he travelled through time seeing history repeat itself: Minoan Knossos, Byzantine Constantinople and Ottoman Smyrna were all violently destroyed, but the survivors escaped to the new worlds of Mycenaean Greece, Renaissance Venice and modern Greece.

At Smyrna in the twentieth century, history was written not only by the victors but was also recorded by the victims. At the same time, however, the twentieth century itself was so filled with reports of ethnic cleansings on such a scale that the reports brutalized the humanity of the supposedly civilized people reading about them, and the tragedy of Smyrna disappeared from public awareness between the cataclysmic upheavals of the First and Second World Wars.

About the Author
Ian Begg studied archaeology in Greece at the America School of Classical Studies in Athens. For this book, the author retraced Gilbert Bagnani's footsteps around Greece, the Aegean, Turkey and Libya. He has not only participated in excavations in Sicily, Greece, Crete and Egypt but also initiated a survey on the island of Karpathos especially for the chapter in this volume.
PRE-ORDER: Human Transgression – Divine Retribution A Study of Religious Transgressions and Punishments in Greek Cultic Regulation and Lydian-Phrygian Propitiatory Inscriptions ('Confession Inscriptions') by Aslak Rostad. Paperback; 175x245; 224 pages. (Print RRP: £32.00). 629 2020. ISBN 9781789695250. Buy Now

This book is forthcoming in Spring/Summer 2020. Click here to download the pre-order form and save 20%

Human Transgression – Divine Retribution analyses pagan concepts of religious transgressions, how they should be regarded and punished, as expressed in Greek cultic regulations from the 5th century BC to the 3rd century AD. Also considered are the so-called propitiatory inscriptions (often referred to as ‘confession inscriptions’) from the 1st to the 3rd century AD Lydia and Phrygia, in light of ‘cultic morality’, an ideal code of behaviour intended to make places, occasions, and worshippers suitable for ritual. This code is on the one hand associated with ‘purity’ (hagneia) and removal of pollution (miasma) caused by deaths, births and sexuality, and on the other with the protection of sacred property. This study seeks to explain the emphasis of divine punishments in the Lydian and Phrygian inscriptions, while rare in most Greek cultic regulations, as part of a continuum within pagan religion rather than as a result of an absolute division between Greek and Oriental religion.

About the Author
Aslak Rostad (born 1972) holds a PhD in Ancient Greek and is Associate Professor of Classics at Norwegian University of Technology and Science (NTNU), Trondheim.

Table of Contents (provisional)

Foreword ;

Part 1. Introduction and Aims of the Study ;
Chapter 1. Introduction ;
Chapter 2. Aims of the study ;

Part 2. The Propitiatory Inscriptions ;
Chapter 3. The Propitiatory Inscriptions and their Religious Context ;
Chapter 4. Earlier Research on the Propitiatory Inscriptions ;

Part 3. Religious Transgressions and Punishments ;
Chapter 5. Greek Cultic Morality ;
Chapter 6. Prohibitions and Punishments in Greek Cultic Regulations ;
Chapter 7. Transgressions in the Propitiatory Inscriptions ;

Part 4. Conclusions ;
Chapter 8. Conclusions ;
Part 5. Appendices, Bibliography and Index Of Citation ;

Appendix A: Cultic Regulations ;
Appendix B: Propitiatory Inscriptions ;
Bibliography ;
Index of Citation
Eastern Roman Mounted Archers and Extraordinary Medico-Surgical Interventions at Paliokastro in Thasos Island during the ProtoByzantine Period The Historical and Medical History Records and the Archaeo-Anthropological Evidence by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+50 pages; 28 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 111 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696011. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696028. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Procopius’ History of the Wars, and the Strategikon offer important aspects of Eastern Roman military tactical changes adopted against their enemies that brought the mounted archer-lancer to domineer in the synthesis of the army, along with concise descriptions of their training, panoply, and effectiveness in the battlefield during the later ProtoByzantine period. Yet, evidence in the archaeo-anthropological records of these highly specialized military members has remained elusive.

A recent archaeological discovery at the strategically positioned, upland, site of Paliokastro in Thasos island, Greece, and the subsequent study of the human skeletal remains interred in four monumental funerary contexts, in a dedicated naiskos building, provide for the first time through the archaeological record of the region a unique insight of the mounted archers and their female kin during the turbulent ProtoByzantine period. The interdisciplinary study of the anthropological materials focusing on skeletal developmental, acquired skeleto-muscular manifestations and skeleto-anatomical changes recovered valuable evidentiary data on aspects of their in vivo long-term training and preparation, traumatisms and pathologies along with extraordinary traces of cranial and infra-cranial surgical interventions and medical regimens by the hands of a most experienced surgeon.

In conjunction with the archaeological and anthropological evidence, historical and medical history records are integrated aiming toward a nexus with the human dynamics that transpired at Paliokastro within the context of the catastrophic consequences of the ‘barbarian’ invasions in the Aegean Thraco-Macedonia, and the ravages afforded by the Justinian plague during the later component of the ProtoByzantine period.

About the Author
Anagnostis P. Agelarakis is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of History at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.
Mortuary Variability and Social Diversity in Ancient Greece Studies on Ancient Greek Death and Burial edited by Nikolas Dimakis and Tamara M. Dijkstra. Paperback; 205x290mm; ii+196 pages; illustrated throughout (includes 60 colour pages). 603 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694420. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694437. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Even though, at death, identity and social status may undergo major changes, by studying funerary customs we can greatly gain in the understanding of a community’s social structure, distribution of wealth and property, and the degree of flexibility or divisiveness in the apportionment of power. With its great regional diversity and variety of community forms and networks, ancient Greece offers a unique context for exploring, through the burial evidence, how communities developed. Mortuary Variability and Social Diversity in Ancient Greece brings together early career scholars working on funerary customs in Greece from the Early Iron Age to the Roman period. Papers present various thematic and interdisciplinary analysis in which funerary contexts provide insights on individuals, social groups and communities. Themes discussed include issues of territoriality, the reconstruction of social roles of particular groups of people, and the impact that major historical events may have had on the way individuals or specific groups of individuals treated their dead.

About the Editors
Nikolas Dimakis is a postdoctoral research fellow in Classical Archaeology at the University of Athens. He specialises in the funerary archaeology of Classical to Roman Greece and examines the interplay of emotions, ritual and identity in the burial context. His research interests also include childhood and gender archaeology, the archaeology of religion and ritual, and terracotta lamps. Nikolas has coordinated and participated in international meetings and in many archaeological projects in Attica, the Peloponnese, Thrace and the Dodecanese.

Tamara M. Dijkstra is a researcher at the Department of Greek Archaeology at the University of Groningen. She specialises in the funerary archaeology and epigraphy of Classical to Roman Greece and examines the relation between mortuary practices, social structure, and social identities. She also studies Hellenistic domestic archaeology within the Halos Archaeological Project.
Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean A Comparative Archaeological Study at Antiochia ad Cragum (Turkey) and Delos (Greece) by Emlyn K. Dodd. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+208 pages; 30 figures, 42 plates. 597 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 63. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694024. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694031. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £36.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Wine was an ever-present commodity that permeated the Mediterranean throughout antiquity; in particular, settlements in the eastern Mediterranean produced substantial quantities of wine for a variety of uses in the Roman and Late Antique eras.

Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean devotes itself to the viticulture of two such settlements, Antiochia ad Cragum and Delos, using results stemming from surface survey and excavation to assess their potential integration within the now well-known agricultural boom of the 5th-7th centuries AD. Interdisciplinary and ethnographic data supplements the main archaeological catalogue and provides a rounded understanding of production and use. The publication of an excavated vinicultural vat in Rough Cilicia for the first time, along with the first complete discussion of the viticultural industry on Delos in Late Antiquity, underscores the significance of this study.

The combined catalogue, analysis and discussion reinforce the noteworthy position viticulture held in Late Antiquity as an agricultural endeavour, socio-cultural and economic factor engrained within eastern Mediterranean settlements.

About the Author
Emlyn K. Dodd is an Honorary Postdoctoral Associate at Macquarie University and Greece Fellow at the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens. He was recently the Macquarie-Gale British School at Rome Scholar.

Reviews
'The volume is beautifully illustrated, with numerous high-quality photographs and other images... [It] also provides a comprehensive survey of ancient evidence and modern scholarship through exhaustive research and meticulous referencing in more than 1000 footnotes. The monograph makes an invaluable contribution to an important topic for late antiquity.' - Tamara Lewit, European Journal of Post-Classical Archaeologies, May 2020
Settlements and Necropoleis of the Black Sea and its Hinterland in Antiquity Select Papers from the Third International Conference ‘The Black Sea in Antiquity and Tekkeköy: An Ancient Settlement on the Southern Black Sea Coast’, 27-29 October 2017, Tekkeköy, Samsun edited by Gocha R. Tsetskhladze and Sümer Atasoy. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+302 pages; 299 figures, 13 tables. 573 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692068. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692075. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Settlements and Necropoleis of the Black Sea and its Hinterland in Antiquity contains a selection of some two dozen of the papers from an international conference held in October 2017 at Tekkeköy in Samsun, ancient Amisos, on the Turkish Black Sea coast. The archaeology sessions included presentations not only on the Tekkeköy/Samsun region but also on other parts of the Black Sea. They were presented by participants from Bulgaria, France, Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey and the United Kingdom. The selection offered here includes almost all of the contributions on archaeology and ancient history. The papers cover all shores of the Black Sea, studying (once again), the establishment dates of some Greek colonies, East Greek transport amphorae, the Black Sea on the Tabula Peutingeriana, the history of Tekkeköy, a Sinopean from Tomis, imports at Açic Suat (Caraburun), arrowhead and dolphin-shaped monetary signs from Berezan, the pre-Roman economy of Myrmekion, the necropolis of Porthmion, Artyushchenko-1 settlement on the Taman Peninsula, South Pontic imports at Classical sites in Ajara, recent excavations in Gonio-Apsarus, the Alaca Höyük Chalcolithic culture in coastal settlements, the Baruthan Tumuli at Amisos, iron finds from the Fatsa Cıngırt Kayası excavations, new excavations at Amastris, ancient Sebastopolis, politics and diplomacy in Paphlagonia, the Great Göztepe tumulus in Paphlagonia, Amasya-Oluz Höyük, the Iron Age sites of Zile district, Byzantine finds at Komana, glass bracelets from Samsun Museum, and dating the Kavak Bekdemir Mosque in Samsun.

About the Editors
Gocha Tsetskhladze (PhD Moscow, DPhil Oxford) is a classical archaeologist who specialises in ancient Greek colonisation and the archaeology of the Mediterranean, the Black Sea, Caucasia, Anatolia, and Central and Eastern Europe in the 1st millennium BC. For more than 20 years he has excavated several Greek colonial sites around the Black Sea (in Georgia, Russia, and the Ukraine). In 2009 he became director of the excavation at Pessinus in central Anatolia. From 2004 to 2015 he taught Mediterranean, Anatolian, and Black Sea archaeology at Melbourne University, Australia. Prior to moving there he had resided in England for 14 years, four of them in Oxford as a pupil of Prof. Sir John Boardman, then ten teaching classical archaeology at the University of London, where he was also director of the University of London excavations in Phanagoria, a Greek colony in South Russia. He has now returned to Britain. Professor Tsetskhladze is the author of more than 250 books, edited volumes, chapters, articles, etc.; founder and series editor of the publication series Colloquia Pontica, now Colloquia Antiqua; and founder and editor-in-chief of the journal Ancient West and East. He has organised many international conferences, congresses, etc., notably the International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities that he established in 1995. He was awarded the Gold Medal of Charles University, Prague, in May 2015, in recognition of his academic achievements, and was made Professor of the University of Bucharest, honoris causa, in November 2015. He has lectured extensively at universities in Europe and North America.

Gocha Tsetskhladze (PhD Moscow, DPhil Oxford) is a classical archaeologist who specialises in ancient Greek colonisation and the archaeology of the Mediterranean, the Black Sea, Caucasia, Anatolia, and Central and Eastern Europe in the 1st millennium BC. For more than 20 years he has excavated several Greek colonial sites around the Black Sea (in Georgia, Russia, and the Ukraine). In 2009 he became director of the excavation at Pessinus in central Anatolia. From 2004 to 2015 he taught Mediterranean, Anatolian, and Black Sea archaeology at Melbourne University, Australia. Prior to moving there he had resided in England for 14 years, four of them in Oxford as a
Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 4 2019 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Paperback; vi+532 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693775. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693782. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The fourth volume of the Journal of Greek Archaeology (JGA) is unusually rich and varied in content. Geographically the articles range from Sicily via Greece to Anatolia and the Near East, while chronologically they extend from the Bronze Age to the Ottoman era. Thematically there is a set of papers in landscape studies which include agricultural history, settlement geography, regional comparisons; articles on material culture which encompass metallurgy, ceramics, the links between language and artefacts, and production and trade; papers on aspects of human social science such as palaeopathology and deformity, gender studies and the representation of the supernatural; historical perspectives are finally represented by articles on fortifications and Islamisation. Of particular note is a lengthy presentation of the survey and excavation at the recently discovered Mycenaean palace in the Sparta Valley.

The review section is even broader, running from the Palaeolithic through to aspects of present-day heritage studies, and covering an equally wide field of topics.

KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies Volume II, 2019 edited by Nicholas J. Molinari (General Editor). 2 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693553. £35.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693560. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As the name indicates, KOINON is a journal that encourages contributions to the study of classical numismatics from a wide variety of perspectives. The journal includes papers concerning iconography, die studies, provenance research, forgery analysis, translations of excerpts from antiquarian works, specialized bibliographies, corpora of rare varieties and types, ethical questions on laws and collecting, book reviews, and more. The editorial advisory board is made up of members from all over the world, with a broad range of expertise covering virtually all the major categories of classical numismatics from archaic Greek coinage to late Medieval coinage.

Table of Contents
An Introductory Note from the General Editor, with Recourse to Plato and Eukleidas

GREEK NUMISMATICS
Numismatic evidence (or not) for the aphippodroma horse race at Larisa – Rosanagh Mack
A Bacchid at Apollonia: a late survival of an ancient family – David Macdonald
An unusual depiction of Ba‘al Arwad and a hippocampus on coins of Arados during the Persian Period – Martin Rowe
The Macedonian Mint at Susa (319/8-312/1 BC) – Lloyd W. H. Taylor
The Susa wreath group Alexanders: The first step in the transformation of an anchor seal to a dynastic emblem – Lloyd W. H. Taylor
A discussion on provenance research with some early provenances uncovered – John Voukelatos

ROMAN NUMISMATICS
The Youthful God revisited: Veiovis on Roman Republican denarii – Tyler Holman
An enigmatic denarius of M. Herennius – Phillip Davis
Some further ideas on a double-obverse bronze of the Constantinian period from the Antioch excavations – Shawn Caza
Back in the saddle again: a re-examination of the FEL TEMP REPARATIO Falling horseman type – Shawn Caza

BYZANTINE AND RELATED COINAGES
The ‘Sirmium Group’ – an overview – Dirk Faltin

MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN COINAGE
Numismatic letterforms of ‘A’ in medieval Europe: A classification system – David B. Spenciner and Marina V. Spenciner
Did Louis X of France mint deniers tournois? (Notes on a few deniers tournois à la croisette) – Andrei Bontas

A CATALOG OF NEW VARIETIES
Listening to the Stones: Essays on Architecture and Function in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries in Honour of Richard Alan Tomlinson edited by Elena C. Partida and Barbara Schmidt-Dounas. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+264 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 pages in colour). 565 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690873. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690880. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Listening to the Stones: Essays on Architecture and Function in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries in Honour of Richard Alan Tomlinson deals with a range of topics that relate to the broad scope of Richard Tomlinson’s archaeological quests and echoes his own methodology in research. Innovative masonry modes, matters of style and orders, proportions and design principles, as well as the inter-regional connections which fostered the transmission of architectural traditions and technical know-how have been cardinal points in Tomlinson’s writings and lectures, as much as the Greek foundations on foreign soil, the forethought in planning, achievements in the field of engineering and the interaction between the secular, the sepulchral and the sacred premises in an ancient city. The conservative or progressive attitudes of a society usually leave an imprint on architectural creations. So, architecture is subject to evolution along with the developing societies. Its gradual changing signifies the building programs taken up by ancient communities. Within this frame, we better comprehend the function of public edifices, the remodeling of cult sites in accordance with historic circumstances, the role of politics in architecture. This book is a token of appreciation of a British professor of archaeology, who spread knowledge of the Greek civilization, manifesting the brilliant spirit of the versatile ancient Greek builders.

About the Editors
Elena C. Partida is research archaeologist at the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports, and adjunct professor at the University of Patras. She holds MA and PhD from the University of Birmingham. Trained by the Academic Staff Development Unit in ‘Teaching, assessing students and presentation skills’, she lectured on Classical archaeology at Birmingham University, as assistant to the head of the Department, Prof. R.A. Tomlinson. Elena attended seminars on Roman architecture at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts and the course ‘Interventions to monuments and historic settlements’ organised by the European Centre for the Precaution and Prognosis of Earthquakes. On the Acropolis of Athens E.P. was responsible for the documentation of architectural disiecta membra within the European project ‘Network of archaeological sites in Athens’. Appointed Curator of Antiquities at Delphi, E.P. carried out a study on the Delphi Museum Re-Exhibition (awarded with the Best Practices distinction), in parallel to studies on the restoration and consolidation of ancient monuments at Delphi; she also designed the installation of open-air exhibitions. As a curator of Patras Archaeological Museum, E.P. is in charge of interdisciplinary international collaborative projects involving cultural patrimony, new finds and new technologies.

Barbara Schmidt-Dounas studied classical archaeology, ancient history and prehistory at the Universities Johann Wolfgang von Goethe at Frankfurt/Main and Georg August at Göttingen in Germany. She was a scientific collaborator at the University Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in Frankfurt/Main – Germany within the project ‘Donations offered by Hellenistic Kings to Greek Cities and Sanctuaries’ which was funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) (1984-1986). Barbara was a lecturer and later an assistant and Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; in 2006 shewas appointed Professor of Classical Archaeology at the same University. Barbara is a member of the founding board of the Interdisciplinary Centre of Archaeological Studies ‘Manolis Andronikos’ (ΔΙ.ΚΕ.ΑΜ.) and a director of the Cast Museum of the Department of Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Barbara is also a corresponding member of the German Archaeological Institute.
Country in the City: Agricultural Functions of Protohistoric Urban Settlements (Aegean and Western Mediterranean) edited by Dominique Garcia, Raphaël Orgeolet, Maia Pomadère and Julian Zurbach. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+200; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (32 plates in colour). 518 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691320. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691337. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The validity of an opposition between rural and urban spaces is an important question for our societies; this question has been raised since the radical transformations of the 20th century and the so-called ‘end of the peasants’. In this context it becomes also a question for archaeologists and historians. Country in the City: Agricultural Functions in Protohistoric Urban Settlements (Aegean and Western Mediterranean) assembles contributions on the place of agricultural production in the context of urbanization in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Mediterranean. The contributions concentrate on the second millennium Aegean and the protohistoric northwestern Mediterranean. They offer a reflection on the nature of urbanization and its consequences for rural spaces near cities and on the many ways in which rural spaces and agricultural activities may be intertwined with urban spaces – a reconsideration of the very nature of urbanism. A deliberate accent is laid on the comparative perspectives between different regions and periods of Mediterranean protohistory, and on the integration of all kinds of sources and research methods, from texts to survey to environmental archaeology. Highlighted throughout are the original paths followed in the Peloponnese or in the Troad with regard to the Minoan model of urbanization, and the many aspects of Minoan urbanization, and many regional differences in Languedoc vis-à-vis Catalonia. Thus a new perspective on Mediterranean urbanization is offered.

About the Editors
Dominique Garcia is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Aix-Marseille and, since 2014, has been president of the lnstitut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research).

Raphaël Orgeolet is Senior Lecturer in Mediterranean Bronze Age Archaeology at Aix-Marseille University. His main research interests focus on settlement, funeral practices and society. He has taken part in various archaeological projects in the Mediterranean and especially in the Aegean and is now leading the excavations of the Neolithic and Bronze Age site of Kirrha in Mainland Greece.

Maia Pomadère is a Senior Lecturer in Aegean Archaeology at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon Sorbonne and member of the UMR 7041-ArScAn. Her research interests encompass Aegean Bronze Age and Early Iron Age archaeology, especially architecture and funerary practices. She has been directing an archaeological excavation in the Minoan town of Malia in Crete since 2005, and is codirecting a geoarchaeological project on the same site.

Julien Zurbach is Senior Lecturer in Greek history at the ENS Paris. He is working on agricultural practices, land distribution and workforce in the Aegean world from the Late Bronze Age to the Archaic period. He concentrates particularly on Mycenaean epigraphy and has led field projects in Kirrha (Phocis) and Miletus (Ionia).
Stamps on Terra Sigillata Found in Excavations of the Theatre of Aptera by Martha W. Baldwin Bowsky. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+208 pages; 98 colour figures. 560 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 54. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692389. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692396. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stamps on Terra Sigillata Found in Excavations of the Theatre of Aptera presents a group of stamped fragments of Italian and eastern sigillata found in excavations of the Theatre of Aptera (Crete). A total of 258 stamped sherds have been discovered and identified: 28 already published by the author and another 230 included here. Aptera now yields more stamped fragments of terra sigillata than any other Cretan city to date, including Knossos.

The sigillata stamps from the Theatre of Aptera can be analysed so as to address a series of fundamental questions. Three of these constitute traditional uses of the evidence available from an analysis of terra sigillata: which potters supplied the Theatre of Aptera and its environs; where these potters were active; when these potters were active and therefore what production centres supplied the Theatre of Aptera and its area over time. Two more questions go further, in an effort to take advantage of this kind of material’s ability to testify to patterns of contact and exchange, as well as to details of life within the Roman imperial system: what distribution patterns might have brought terra sigillata to the Theatre of Aptera and its vicinity; and whether we can suggest how terra sigillata was consumed in Aptera’s Theatre and its environs.

Aptera’s Theatre was a venue not only for performances but for drinking, eating, and serving, on the part of theatregoers, spectators, actors and other performers. These activities took place during a period of prosperity for Roman Aptera in the first and second centuries, a period that coincides nicely with the production and distribution of terra sigillata. The people of Aptera and the surrounding area took full advantage of Crete’s strategic position amid crossroads of transit and exchange as well as integration into the Roman economy, to display their prosperity and status in public and in private.

About the Author
Martha W. Baldwin Bowsky is a Professor Emerita of Classical Studies, retired from the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California; she now lives and pursues research from a base in High Point, North Carolina. She graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. She began her career as an epigraphist when she was involved in field research on Crete in 1979 and 1980, while preparing a doctoral dissertation on the Julio-Claudian governors of the province of Creta-Cyrenae. After a year at the University of California at Davis, she enjoyed a full career of teaching and research at University of the Pacific; she remains an active scholar and participant in international conferences. Throughout her career she has been active in epigraphical research on the archaeological sites and in the storerooms and museums of Crete, with a particular interest in the Roman period on the island. Her focus has turned from top-down studies of provincial administration to bottom-up studies of the material culture of the island as an active participant in the Roman empire. She has authored a significant number of articles both publishing new inscriptions – on stone and on pottery – and also setting these and other Cretan inscriptions into their historical and archaeological contexts.
NVMINA MAGNA: Roma e il culto dei Grandi Dei di Samotracia by Emiliano Cruccas. Paperback; 175x245mm; x+142 pages; 1 table, 73 figures (16 plates in colour). Italian text throughout. 507 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 56. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690910. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690927. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The cult of the Great Gods of Samothrace, which became popular starting as early as the 7th century BC in the eastern Mediterranean, is characterised by regional differences concerning cultural manifestations and relationships with local deities. Confused and identified with the so-called Cabiri, these deities had their main sanctuaries on the islands of Samothrace and Lemnos and in Thebes, in Boeotia. The connection between these deities and others like Dioscuri, Penates and Lares and their protective function seem to be a key to understanding the complex syncretism that characterises the cult of the Great Gods from the period of Roman conquests in the Eastern world. The literary sources seem to highlight, in fact, in the period in which the interests in the Eastern world are crucial to the foreign policy of Rome, an evident attempt to identify the Kabiroi of Samothrace with typically Roman gods like Lares and Penates. The aim of this book is to underline the main aspects of the cult in light of the influences of Roman cultural and mythological substratum.

Il culto dei Grandi Dei di Samotracia, diffuso nel Mediterraneo orientale a partire almeno dal VII secolo a.C., è caratterizzato da differenze nei diversi bacini geografici, sia per ciò che concerne le manifestazioni culturali, sia per quanto riguarda i rapporti con le divinità locali. Confusi ed identificati con i cosiddetti Cabiri, queste divinità avevano i loro principali santuari sulle isole di Samotracia e Lemno e a Tebe di Beozia. La loro connessione con i Dioscuri, i Penati e i Lari e la loro funzione protettiva sembrano essere la chiave di lettura per comprendere il complesso sincretismo che caratterizza il culto dei Grandi Dei a partire dalla conquista romana del Mediterraneo occidentale. Le fonti letterarie sembrano evidenziare, infatti, nel periodo nel quale le azioni di politica estera di Roma si concentrano in Oriente, una forte volontà di identificare gli dei di Samotracia con divinità tipicamente romane come Lari e Penati. Lo scopo di questo libro è quello di mettere in evidenza i principali aspetti del culto attraverso l’analisi delle influenze del sostrato culturale e mitologico di Roma.

About the Author
EMILIANO CRUCCAS completed his degree (2002) and his specialisation in Classical Archaeology (2006) at the University of Cagliari and received his PhD (2011) from the University of Tübingen. He worked on a two-year contract at the Young Researchers project at the University of Cagliari and holds a three-year postdoctoral grant. He is now (2013-present day) field director for the ISTHMOS excavation project in the Punic-roman city of Nora (south Sardinia).

Emiliano Cruccas ha conseguito presso l’Università di Cagliari la laurea (2002) e la specializzazione in Archeologia Classica (2006). È Dottore di ricerca con una tesi sul culto dei Cabiri e dei Grandi Dei discussa all’Università di Tübingen (2011). Ha svolto ricerca presso l’Università di Cagliari con un contratto di due anni per Giovani Ricercatori e con un assegno di ricerca di tre anni. Attualmente dirige sul campo il progetto di scavo ISTHMOS nella città punico-romana di Nora (sud Sardegna).
Execution by Styrax in Ancient Thasos by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+42 pages; 33 figures, 5 graphs (27 plates presented in full colour). 86 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692129. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692136. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Searching through interdisciplinary research to recover echoes of the human condition ingrained as they may be in the skeletal record of the ancients, there have been few cases in the forty year experience of the author which in defiance to the relentless passage of Chrόnos and even the chthonic potency of the waters of Léthe to dissolve all strings relating to Mnenosỳne could offer compelling evidentiary data, critical for generating meaningful interpretive answers as a nexus to life pathways and experiences in antiquity, reflective of dynamics and circumstances, that were not always possible to be recorded or spoken of by the attendants of Cléo. And yet in rare cases, millennia later, ostensibly through the works of Láchesis, a synergy between the fields of Archaeological Anthropology and Bioarchaeology may offer a unique portal whereby the dictum mortui vivos docent may be reiterated.

Sharing in the objectives of an ongoing archaeo-anthropological endeavor, aiming to better decipher and elucidate facets of the human condition while carrying out funerary archaeological research of Hellenistic to Roman periods family graves at the extensive ancient necropolis of Thasos, the most northern Aegean island, this essay addresses a case of unique forensic / bioarchaeological interest involving an older male individual, a member of one of the clusters of burials, who had been placed as a single interment in a most conspicuous limestone cyst grave of the Hellenistic period.

While odontological, cranio-infracranial skeleto-anatomic manifestations and palaeopathologies revealed a detailed rostrum on aspects of his developmental growth, of acquired and degenerative somatic changes, reflective of his life experiences which involved long term most active participations in physically demanding yet specialized activities, a staggering ‘through and through’ sternal trauma of astonishing preservation, provided for a distinct opportunity to conduct a unique cross-disciplinary investigation on the nature of the weapon reconstructed in bronze, the archaeometry on the trajectory and factors of speed and force at the deliverance of the strike, along with the diagnostic assessments of the thoracic tissues pierced consecutively and their moribund consequences.

A review of historical references on the implementation of capital punishment either through the decision of a dicastic or ephetic court, and/or execution carried out as a result of outlawry are evaluated in relevance to funerary practices as these pertained to the interment of the Thasian male within the context of the burial ground, offering in retrospect assessments on the probable cause of his violent death.

About the Author
ANAGNOSTIS P. AGELARAKIS is Professor of Anthropology at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.

In the earlier years of his career, he carried out field and/or lab archaeo-anthropological research projects focusing on the organizational abilities, capacities, and adaptations of the human condition during the Holocene in SE and SW Asia, the Middle East, the American Northeast, and the Caribbean.

The central area of his research remains however the Eastern Mediterranean with emphasis on the ancient world of the Greeks, at the cross roads and sea routes between Africa, Asia, and Europe. Under the domains of Anthropological Archaeology, Funerary Archaeology, Bio-Archaeology and Forensics he studies the biological profiles, the demographic dynamics, and palaeopathological records of human skeletal populations from prehistoric periods to the late medieval era. Based on the skeletal record, he i
Macedonia – Alexandria: Monumental Funerary Complexes of the Late Classical and Hellenistic Age by Dorota Gorzelany. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+236 pages; 76 Figures (44 full colour, 32 monochrome). 517 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691368. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691375. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The type of monumental tomb that developed in Macedonia in the late Classical period was undoubtedly the most impressive of all the Greek funerary complexes. It was a burial chamber with a vestibule, built of stone blocks, vaulted and furnished with an architectural facade, concealed under a large tumulus rising above the ground. The concept of the Macedonian sepulcher, which the Macedonians and Greeks settling in Alexandria ad Aegyptum, the city founded by Alexander the Great on the Egyptian coast, brought with them, influenced the structural form of the underground tombs that were developed in the new city. ‘Macedonia–Alexandria’ explores the scope of this influence, comparing in synthetic form the structural elements of the cist graves, chamber and rock-cut tombs of Macedonia with the Alexandrian hypogea, while taking into account the different geographical factors that conditioned them. This is followed by a presentation of the facade and interior decoration, and a discussion of the themes of wall painting inside the tombs and a characteristic of the surviving tomb furnishings.

The Macedonian tomb reflects in its form Greek eschatological beliefs ingrained in the mystery religions and the social ideology of the Macedonian kingdom. The assimilation of these beliefs is seen in the architectural arrangements, the vestibule and chamber plan, the facade (in Macedonia) or courtyard (in Alexandria), the structural and architectural interior decoration, and the furniture found in the chamber. These elements refer to palace architecture and determine the symbolic function of the tomb. The cult of the dead aspect is emphasized by wall painting iconography, the form of burial and the nature of the grave goods accompanying the deceased. In Alexandria, the role of rituals celebrated in the family tombs is attested by the declining size of burial chambers in favour of the vestibules and by the introduction of an open courtyard as well as the presence of altars. With regard to the ideology behind the Alexandrian complexes, the author explores the issue of the coexistence and the popularity of Egyptian beliefs adopted into Alexandrian sepulchral art, emphasizing the differences in the perception of the role of the tomb in the Macedonian and Egyptian consciousness.

About the Author
DOROTA GORZELANY studied Mediterranean Archaeology at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow, where she received her PhD in 2005. Since 1999 she has been a keeper of the ancient art collection in the Princes Czartoryski Museum (National Museum in Krakow) and a curator of the Gallery of Ancient Art. Since 2005 she has taught Ancient Art at the Pontifical University of John Paul II and since 2018 at the University of Silesia. She is a member of ICOM-Poland and Commission on the Archaeology of the Mediterranean Countries in the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences (PAU). Her research focusses on Greek and Roman iconography and the history of the museum collection.
Archaic and Classical Harbours of the Greek World The Aegean and Eastern Ionian contexts by Chiara Maria Mauro. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+116 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £30.00). 516 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691283. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691290. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaic and Classical Harbours of the Greek World explores the archaeology and history of ancient harbours and focuses on the Greek world during the Archaic and Classical eras. Its objective is to establish a consensus on three fundamental questions: What locations were the most propitious for the installation of harbours? What kinds of harbour-works were built and for what purpose? What harbour forms were documented? These subjects have been addressed by evaluating multiple forms of evidence (archaeological, geographical, nautical, textual, iconographic and geological) in the context of the Aegean and Eastern Ionian maritime settings.

About the Author
CHIARA MARIA MAURO gained an MA in Classical Archaeology at the University of Pisa (Italy) in 2012 with a dissertation on Phoenician seafaring in the Archaic period, and in 2014 she completed a master’s degree in Teaching History, Geography and History of Art at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Spain). In 2016 she obtained a PhD in Studies on the Ancient World from the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). In 2015 she was Visiting Research Student at the University Alma Mater (Bologna, Italy); in October 2017 she was awarded an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship to work on the project ‘Ancient Harbours in the Greek World: A study of Aegean and eastern Ionian Sea harbours from the dawn of the city-state to the Classical period’. She is currently Postdoctoral Fellow at the Haifa Center for Mediterranean History in the Department of Maritime Civilizations.
Greek Art in Motion Studies in honour of Sir John Boardman on the occasion of his 90th Birthday edited by Rui Morais, Delfim Leão, Diana Rodríguez Pérez with Daniela Ferreira. Paperback; iv+510 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (230 colour plates). 485 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690231. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690248. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication on Greek Art gathers a large number of studies presented at the International Congress ‘Greek Art in Motion’. Held in honour of Sir John Boardman’s 90th birthday, the congress took place at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, 3-5 May, 2017.

The volume first presents eight contributions by the keynote speakers who, as friends and students of Sir John, present a debate and a problematisation of Greek Art from the archaeological and historical point of view.

Thereafter, 45 papers are divided into the different themes considered during the congress, all of which have greatly benefited from Sir John's researches throughout his long and distinguished academic career: Sculpture, Architecture, Terracotta and Metal, Greek Pottery, Coins, Greek History and Archaeology, Greeks Overseas, Reception and Collecting, Art and Myth.

About the Editors
RUI MORAIS was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in History, variant of Archaeology from the University of Coimbra. He has a Masters in Urban Archaeology, PhD in Archaeology, Technology and Materials from University of Minho. He was Professor at Minho University and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Among his research, he has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH). He was a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for antiques. He is a member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project.

DELFIM LEÃO is a Professor at the Institute of Classical Studies and a researcher at the Center for Classical and Humanistic Studies, University of Coimbra. His main areas of interest are ancient history, law and political theory of the Greeks, theatrical pragmatics, and the ancient novel. He also has a strong interest in digital humanities. Among his main recent works are D. F. Leão and P. J. Rhodes, ‘The Laws of Solon. A new Edition, with Introduction, Translation and Commentary’ (London, I. B. Tauris, 2015), and a second revised edition in 2016; D. F. Leão and G. Thür (Hrsg.) ‘Symposion 2015. Vorträge zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte’ (Wien, Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2016). Along with Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta, he is the editor of Brill’s ‘Plutarch Studies’.

DIANA RODRÍGUEZ PÉREZ is a Junior Research Fellow at Mougins Museum in Classical Art and Material Culture at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and was previously the Research Assistant for the Beazley Archive Pottery Database at the Classical Art Research Centre. Before moving to Oxford, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Edinburgh (FECYT). She received a PhD (Doctor Europaea) from the University of León, Spain (The Snake in the Ancient Greek World: Myth, Rite and Image), an MPhil in History of Art from the University of León, and an MPhil in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. From 2010 to 2011 she worked as a translator at the European Parliament in Luxemburg, and was a DAAD Fellow at the Institut für klassische Archäologie of the University of Heidelberg from 2008 to 2009. In the summer of 2017 she was Tytus Scholar at the Department of Classical Studies of the University of Cincinnati (US).

DANIELA FERREIRA is currently a PhD student at the Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archeology of Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, and a researcher at UI&D CITCEM - Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory», Portugal. She is also a recipient of a FCT (Portuguese national funding agency for science, research and technology) grant since 2015. Daniela holds a Master’s degree in Archaeology from the University of Oporto (Portugal), with a focus
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 3 2018 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+208 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (43 plates in colour). Papers in English and German. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691719. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2399-1852-3-2019. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

ARTICLES
Notes on a Hellenistic Milk Pail – by Yannis Chairetakis
Chasing Arsinoe (Polis Chrysochous, Cyprus): A Sealed Early Hellenistic Cistern and Its Ceramic Assemblage – by Brandon R. Olson, Tina Najbjerb & R. Scott Moore
Hasmonean Jerusalem in the Light of Archaeology – Notes on Urban Topography – by Hillel Geva
A Phoenician / Hellenistic Sanctuary at Horbat Turit (Kh. et-Tantur) – by Walid Atrash, Gabriel Mazor & Hanaa Aboud with contributions by Adi Erlich & Gerald Finkielsztejn
Schmuck aus dem Reich der Nabatäer – hellenistische Traditionen in frührömischer Zeit – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECT
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2018 – by Thomas Landvatter, Brandon R. Olson, David S. Reese, Justin Stephens & R. Scott Moore
Bookmark: Ancient Gems, Finger Rings and Seal Boxes from Caesarea Maritima. The Hendler Collection – by Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Herskovitz

BOOK REVIEWS
Nina Fenn, Späthellenistische und frühkaiserzeitliche Keramik aus Priene. Untersuchungen zu Herkunft und Produktion – by Susanne Zabehlicky-Scheffenegger
Raphael Greenberg, Oren Tal & Tawfiq Da῾adli, Bet Yerah III. Hellenistic Philoteria and Islamic al- Ṣinnabra. The 1933–1986 and 2007–2013 Excavations – bY Gabriel Mazor
Mohamed Kenawi & Giorgia Marchiori, Unearthing Alexandria’s archaeology: The Italian Contribution – by Carlo De Mitri
Popular Religion and Ritual in Prehistoric and Ancient Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean edited by Giorgos Vavouranakis, Konstantinos Kopanias and Chrysanthos Kanellopoulos. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+170 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (30 plates in colour). 481 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690453. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690460. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume features a group of select peer-reviewed papers by an international group of authors, both younger and senior academics and researchers. It has its origins in a conference held at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, which aimed to bring up the frequently-neglected popular cult and other ritual practices in prehistoric and ancient Greece and the eastern Mediterranean. The topics covered by the chapters of the volume include the interplay between elite and popular ritual at cemeteries and peak sanctuaries just before and right after the establishment of the first palaces in Minoan Crete; the use of conical cups in Minoan ritual; the wide sharing of religious and other metaphysical beliefs as expressed in the wall-paintings of Akrotiri on the island of Thera; the significance of open-air sanctuaries, figurines and other informal cult and ritual paraphernalia in the Aegean, Cyprus and the Levant from the late bronze age to the archaic period; the role of figurines and caves in popular cult in the classical period; the practice of cursing in ancient Athens; and the popular element of sports games in ancient Greece.

About the Editors

GIORGOS VAVOURANAKIS is Assistant Professor in Prehistoric Aegean: Theoretical Archaeology at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied at the same university and did his MA and PhD at the University of Sheffield. He has worked as a contract archaeologist for the Hellenic Ministry of Culture, as a post-doctoral researcher at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and as adjunct faculty at the Universities of Crete and the Peloponnese, and the Hellenic Open University. His research interests include archaeological theory, especially landscape archaeology and funerary archaeology, but also the history of archaeological research. He has directed field projects in Cyprus and Crete and is currently the deputy director of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens excavation at Marathon.

KONSTANTINOS KOPANIAS is Assistant Professor of Ancient Civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied at the same university and also at the Paris-Lodron University of Salzburg and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. He has worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Athens, as adjunct faculty at the University of Crete and as Allgemeiner Referent at the German Archaeological Institute in Athens. Since 2011 he has been the director of the University of Athens excavaton in Tell Nader and Tell Baqrta in the Kurdistan Region in Iraq.

CHRYSANTHOS KANELLOPOULOS is an archaeologist specializing in classical architecture. He is Assistant Professor at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He was employed for a number of years as a historical architect at the American Center of Oriental Research in Amman, Jordan, where he worked on the buildings of both Amman and Petra. His PhD thesis treated the classical and Hellenistic phases of ancient Karthaia on the island of Kea. He is the author of Amman: The Great Temple (Amman 1996) and the Late Roman Temenos Wall at Epidauros (Athens 1999), co-author of the Petra Church (Amman 2001), The Thymele at Epidauros (Fargo 2017) and The North Ridge in Petra (Amman 2018). During recent years, Dr Kanellopoulos’ work has focussed on the architecture of the Library of Hadrian in Athens and of the temple of Zeus Basileus in Levadeia.

Reviews

'The topic of the conference and of this volume is a welcome one in the field of Greek religion. Its greatest strength is the centering of under-published bodies of material from ritual contexts, such as figurines, and the emphasis on the importance of their contextualization within ritual p
Human Mobility in Archaeology: Practices, Representations and Meanings Ex Novo: Journal of Archaeology, Volume 3, 2018 edited by Maja Gori, Martina Revello Lami and Alessandro Pintucci. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691214. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

It has been abundantly demonstrated that theories and paradigms in the humanities are influenced by historical, economic and socio-cultural conditions, which have profoundly influenced archaeology’s representation of migration. This was mostly conceived as the study of the movement of large and homogenous population groups, whose identity was often represented as ethnically characterized. The present-day shift of attention from collective to individual agency and the countless facets of migration goes hand in hand with new socio-political and cultural scenarios such as the extraordinary migratory flows into Europe, shifting boundaries, alternative forms of citizenship and identity, and the emergence of emotive reactionism.

The third issue of Ex Novo gathers multidisciplinary contributions addressing mobility to understand patterns of change and continuity in past worlds; reconsider the movement of people, objects, and ideas alongside mobile epistemologies, such as intellectual, scholarly or educative traditions, rituals, practices, religions and theologies; and provide insights into the multifaceted relationship between mobile practices and their shared meanings and how they are represented socially and politically.

Table of Contents
Maja GORI, Martina REVELLO LAMI & Alessandro PINTUCCI
Editorial: Practices, Representations and Meanings of Human Mobility in Archaeology

Paraskevi ELEFANTI & Gilbert MARSHALL
Mobility during the Upper Palaeolithic Greece: Some Suggestions for the Argolid Peninsula

Maurizio CRUDO
Greek Migrations along the Ionian Coast (Southern Italy)

Anna RAUDINO
Variation in Material Culture: Adoption of Greek Ceramics in an Indigenous Sicilian Site (8th century BC)

Maria ÁLVAREZ-FOLGADO
The Jewish Diaspora in the Roman Empire. Diaspora, Social Agents and Social Networks: Towards the Creation of a New Analytical Toolkit

Domiziana ROSSI
A Road to Fīrūzābād

Marijn STOLK
Exploring Immigrant Identities: The Link between Portuguese Ceramics and Sephardic Immigrants in 17th Century Amsterdam

Jesùs GARCÍA SANCHEZ
From War Material Culture to Popular Heritage, and Beyond. The PSP “Cancelli di Venosa” as paradigms of Object Biography Theory.

Reviews
A. Falcone & A. D’Eredità (eds.) ARCHEOSOCIAL L’Archeologia Riscrive il Web: Esperienze, Strategie e Buone Pratiche, Rende (CS): Dielle Editore, 2018, 195 pp. Reviewed by Paola DI GIUSEPPANTONIO DI FRANCO
Practices of Personal Adornment in Neolithic Greece Πρακτικές Προσωπικής Κόσμησης στη Νεολιθική Ελλάδα by Fotis Ifantidis. Paperback; xxxvi+596 pages; 121 figures + fully illustrated catalogue (31 plates in colour). Greek text with English Summary. 75 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691139. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691146. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The objective of this book is the reconsideration of the practices of personal adornment during the Neolithic period in Greece, through the assemblage, extensive bibliographic documentation, and critical evaluation of all the available data deriving from more than a hundred sites in the mainland and the Aegean islands –an archaeological archive of wide geographical and chronological scope. In addition, a thorough study of the personal ornament corpus from the Middle-Late Neolithic Dispilio in Kastoria, an important lakeside settlement in north-western Greece, was conducted.

The book begins with an overview of the anthropological and archaeological literature on theoretical and methodological issues concerning practices of personal adornment. Then follows an examination of the problems and key points of study regarding personal adornment in Neolithic Greece, as well as a critical evaluation of the methodological approaches and classification schemes that have been applied in previous archaeological works. Subsequently, the technologies and processes of production, consumption, recycling, deposition, and distribution of personal ornaments in Neolithic Greece are discussed. Finally, the social correlates of personal adornment are explored, as they are reflected in the choice of different raw materials (shell, clay, bone, stone, and metal) and ornament types (beads, pendants, annulets, and so forth).

About the Author
FOTIS IFANTIDIS studied archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. His academic research is focused on personal adornment practices in prehistory, and on the interplay between photography and archaeology, with case studies the Athenian Acropolis, the ancient city of Kalaureia on the island of Poros, and the Neolithic settlements of Dispilio and Koutroulou Magoula. Among his publications are Spondylus in Prehistory (co-authored with M. Nikolaidou), Camera Kalaureia (co-authored with Y. Hamilakis) and Archaeographies: Excavating Neolithic Dispilio.

Greek description
Στόχος του βιβλίου είναι η επανεξέταση των πρακτικών προσωπικής κόσμησης κατά τη νεολιθική περίοδο στην Ελλάδα μέσω της επανεκτίμησης των διαθέσιμων στοιχείων που προέρχονται από περισσότερες από εκατό ανεσκαμμένες νεολιθικές θέσεις, καθώς και η λεπτομερειακή μελέτη του corpus κοσμημάτων που προέρχονται από τη λιμναία θέση της Μέσης-Νεότερης Νεολιθικής περιόδου στ&#
Le classi ceramiche della “tradizione mista” a Kos nel Tardo Bronzo IA by Salvatore Vitale. Paperback; 203x276mm; 232 pages; 24 tables, 13 colour plates, 38 black & white line drawings, 24 black & white plates. Italian text with English abstract. 51 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918859. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918866. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume focuses on the pottery classes of the ‘Entangled Tradition’, recovered at the settlement of the ‘Serraglio’ on Kos during the early Late Bronze Age period. The results reveal new information on the chronology, typology, and decoration of Koan Painted Fine (PF) and Painted Medium-Coarse to Coarse (PMC-C) ceramics. Moreover, the analysis of manufacturing processes and consumption patterns contributes to a better comprehension of the socio-cultural and political context in which Koan entangled classes were produced.

The data presented in this volume indicate that PF and PMC-C ceramics represent a unique case of fully entangled classes in the Aegean, which merge features of the Koan ‘Local Tradition’ with characteristics of the Minoan potting tradition into a new technological and stylistic language. Contacts between these different cultures are explained based on the theoretical model provided by ‘human mobility’. The specific Koan cultural synthesis was endorsed and promoted by the local elites of the ‘Serraglio’, who aimed to participate in the ‘new environment’ determined by the economic and cultural expansion of Neopalatial Crete.

In this respect, the manufacture of Koan entangled classes served a dual role. On the one hand, using transport containers made in the PMC-C class, Koan products were exported and exchanged throughout the Aegean. In addition, the finer vessels of the Koan ‘Entangled Tradition’ were utilized for promoting Minoan-type social practices at the ‘Serraglio’. Through these practices, Koan elites reshaped their identity and portrayed an image of higher status within the local social arena.

About the Author
Dr SALVATORE VITALE completed his MA in Classical Literature and PhD in Classical Archaeology at the University of Pisa in 2001 and 2007. After his PhD, Dr Vitale held post-doctoral and research fellowships at the Universities of Calabria, Cincinnati, and Pisa and at the Italian Archaeological School at Athens.

Dr Vitale has taught Aegean Archaeology at the University of Milan and the Italian Archaeological School at Athens, as well as Greek and Roman Archaeology at the University of Pisa. At Pisa, he has also served as one of the editors of the journal ΑΓΩΓΗ.

Since 2009, Dr Vitale has been the director of the ‘Serraglio, Eleona, and Langada Archaeological Project’ (SELAP), a research endeavour under the auspices of the Italian Archaeological School at Athens. In addition, he is currently a senior staff and a chief pottery expert for the Mitrou Archaeological Project in Phthiotida and the Palace of Nestor Excavations at Pylos.
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture: Subscription Portal for Online Access by One volume published annually. Edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). ISBN 2399-1844-PORTAL. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  

Welcome to the online portal for access to volumes of the Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture (JHP).

For the Hellenistic Period ceramics and other commodities of daily life represent probably the most neglected objects in archaeological research. Yet, the study of Hellenistic material culture has intensified during the last twenty years, with a focus clearly on what is by far the largest category of finds, pottery. Meanwhile research has gained momentum, but still there has unfortunately been no parallel development in the media landscape. Apart from monographs, the publication of conference proceedings, which usually follow several years after the event, have remained the principal method of disseminating research results. Still lacking is a publication appearing regularly and at short intervals, that focusses research on Hellenistic pottery and is easily accessible.

The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery – JHP – wants to close this gap.

JHP is scheduled to appear once a year, more often if necessary. It should provide a forum for all kinds of studies on Hellenistic pottery and everyday objects. Apart from professional articles, the journal will contain book reviews, short presentations of research projects (including dissertations) and general news. The Editorial Board is headed by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph.

Access journal issues and articles via the links below:

JHP Volumes:

JHP Volume 1, 2016
JHP Volume 2, 2017
JHP Volume 3, 2018
The Mycenaean Cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras People, material remains and culture in context by Constantinos Paschalidis with contributions by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. Paperback; 205x290mm; xxiv+510 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (277 plates in colour). (Print RRP £90.00). 436 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919191. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919207. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean Cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras: People, material remains and culture in context comprises the study of the finds from the excavation of the Mycenaean cemetery of Clauss near Patras, carried out by the University of Ioannina and the Archaeological Society at Athens from 1988 to 1992, under the direction of Professor Thanassis Papadopoulos. In the course of the excavation project, fifteen chambered tombs were located and researched in detail, to be added to those already known from the pre-war excavations by Nikolaos Kyparissis. The presentation of the topic expands into seven thematic chapters: from a general review of the cemetery space and the sites, to analytical description of the excavation, remarks on the architecture, study of the finds, analysis of the burial customs and finally, narration of the overall history of the cemetery according to chronological period and generation of its occupants. The eighth and last chapter is an addendum including a brief presentation of the anthropological analysis of the skeletal material by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. The Mycenaean cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras presents fragments of the life and death of some members of a local community that existed for almost four centuries at the western end of the Mycenaean world.

About the Author
CONSTANTINOS PASCHALIDIS was born in Athens in 1973. He studied History at the Ionian University, Corfu, and Archaeology at the University of Ioannina, where he successfully composed his doctoral thesis on the Mycenaean cemetery at Clauss, near Patras. Starting in 1992 he has participated in and worked for several archaeological projects (excavations, surveys and study-seasons) in Crete, Keos, Kythnos, Achaea, Argolid, Kefalonia, Ithaca, Corfu, Chalkidiki in Greece, as well as at the sites of Ghor as Safi and Tell Kafrein in Jordan. Since 2002 he is a Curator of Antiquities at the Department of Prehistoric, Egyptian, Cypriot and Near Eastern Collections of the National Archaeological Museum at Athens, and from 2012 he holds the position of Secretary at the Central Archaeological Council of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports. Paschalidis.

Reviews

'As the primary publication… of archaeological data, this volume will quickly take its place as the repository and discussion of an important cemetery in the northwest Peloponnese, in a part of the Mycenaean world that never boasted a palatial center. The excellent illustrations will serve generations of scholars interested in various aspects of Mycenaean material culture.' - John K. Papadopoulos, UCLA (Bryn Mawr Classical Review: http://www.bmcreview.org/2019/05/20190550.html)