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NEW: Problems of Chronology in Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the First International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 23rd-24th March, 2017 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. iv+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). 419 2018. ISBN 9781784918552. Book contents pageDownload

Print edition will be available before the end of March. Open Access edition available to download now.

Since the beginning of Gandhāran studies in the nineteenth century, chronology has been one of the most significant challenges to the understanding of Gandhāran art. Many other ancient societies, including those of Greece and Rome, have left a wealth of textual sources which have put their fundamental chronological frameworks beyond doubt. In the absence of such sources on a similar scale, even the historical eras cited on inscribed Gandhāran works of art have been hard to place. Few sculptures have such inscriptions and the majority lack any record of find-spot or even general provenance. Those known to have been found at particular sites were sometimes moved and reused in antiquity. Consequently, the provisional dates assigned to extant Gandhāran sculptures have sometimes differed by centuries, while the narrative of artistic development remains doubtful and inconsistent.

Building upon the most recent, cross-disciplinary research, debate and excavation, this volume reinforces a new consensus about the chronology of Gandhāra, bringing the history of Gandhāran art into sharper focus than ever. By considering this tradition in its wider context, alongside contemporary Indian art and subsequent developments in Central Asia, the authors also open up fresh questions and problems which a new phase of research will need to address.

Problems of Chronology in Gandhāran Art is the first publication of the Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre, which has been supported by the Bagri Foundation and the Neil Kreitman Foundation. It presents the proceedings of the first of three international workshops on fundamental questions in the study of Gandhāran art, held at Oxford in March 2017.

About the Editors
WANNAPORN RIENJANG is Project Assistant of the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. She completed her doctoral degree in Archaeology at the University of Cambridge on Buddhist relic cult in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Before starting her PhD, she worked as a research assistant for the Masson Project at the Department of Coins and Medals, the British Museum. Her research interests include the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Buddhist studies, and working technologies of stone containers and beads.

PETER STEWART is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran art and Roman sculpture.
NEW: Technologie lithique et circulation des matieres premieres au paleolithique moyen dans Le Salento by Enza E. Spinapolice. xii+224 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout with 14 plates in colour. French text.. 409 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918217. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918224. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Salento is a peninsula in Southern Italy, the heel of the Italian boot, characterised both by an abundance of Middle Palaeolithic sites and a scarcity of raw material suitable for knapping. The research question at the basis of this book concerns the managing of raw materials by Neanderthals, through both the procurement and use of the locally available raw materials and the exploitation of possibly more distant sources.

Le Salento est une péninsule du sud de l’Italie, le talon de la botte italienne, caractérisée à la fois par l’abondance des sites du Paléolithique moyen et par une pénurie des matières premières propres à la taille. La question de recherche à la base de ce livre concerne la gestion des matières premières par les Néandertaliens, à travers l’approvisionnement et l’utilisation des matières premières disponibles localement et l’exploitation éventuelle de sources plus éloignées.

About the Author ENZA E. SPINAPOLICE is a researcher at Sapienza University of Rome. She is a Palaeolithic archaeologist, broadly interested in what makes us human. Her main research focus is on the origins and spread of modern humans and the Neanderthal extinction. She is currently studying MSA lithic industries from North Africa, Ethiopia and Kenya and Mousterian/Uluzzian record from Italy. She is particularly interested in the interactions between culture and biological evolution, as well as in the cultural, social and demographic processes of prehistoric hunter-gatherers from both a synchronic and diachronic perspective.

ENZA E. SPINAPOLICE est chercheur à l’Université La Sapienza, Rome (Italie). Elle est une archéologue du paléolithique, intéressée à la question de «ce qui nous rend humains». Ses principaux intérêts de recherche portent sur les origines et la diffusion des humains modernes et sur l’extinction des Néandertaliens. Elle étudie actuellement les industries lithiques MSA d’Afrique du Nord, d’Éthiopie et du Kenya et la Transition Moustérien/ Uluzzien en Italie. Elle s’intéresse particulièrement aux interactions entre la culture et l’évolution biologique, ainsi qu’aux processus culturels, sociaux et démographiques des chasseurs-cueilleurs préhistoriques, d’un point de vue synchronique et diachronique.
NEW: Social Interactions and Status Markers in the Roman World edited by George Cupcea and Rada Varga. xii+168 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 plates in colour). 407 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 37. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917487. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917494. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In 2016, in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, some forty scholars from around the world attended the People of the Ancient World conference. This was organized within the framework of the Romans 1 by 1 project, and its main focus was on improving knowledge on ancient populations, employing a variety of methodologies, tools and research techniques. The presentations provided the editors with ten papers to be further developed and reunited under these covers. They encompass diverse approaches to Roman provincial populations and the corresponding case-studies highlight the multi-faceted character of Roman society.

The volume takes four main directions: prosopography (from Italy to Spain); ancient professions and professionals (merchants in Noricum, Lower Moesia, general nomenclature and encoding of professions, associations and family life); onomastics and origins, and finally, the military (iconography of funerary monuments and centurions’ social life). The publication is intended, on one hand, to enhance knowledge of the diversity of Roman social standings, of the exhibited social markers and – perhaps most important – stress the variety of forms which express status and place within the community, and on the other, to reiterate a series of fresh, modern views on these matters, resulting from a gathering of mostly junior researchers.

About the Author
GEORGE CUPCEA is a researcher at the National History Museum of Transylvania and Babeș-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca, Romania. His interests lie in the field of Latin epigraphy, Roman military history, especially the hierarchy of the Roman army. He also specialises in Roman provincial archaeology, especially non-invasive techniques and he is working on the enlistment process of the Dacian frontier in the UNESCO World Heritage List, as part of the trans-national FRE site.

RADA VARGA is a researcher at Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, and specialises on digital epigraphy, ancient population studies, Roman occupations and professions. She is the coordinator of the project that hosted the conference (http://romans1by1.com), and also directs the archaeological excavations in the civil settlement of the auxiliary fort of Războieni (Ad Batavos), Dacia.
NEW: The Gwithian Landscape: Molluscs and Archaeology on Cornish Sand Dunes by Thomas M. Walker with contributions from Rowena Y. Banerjea and C. Rob Batchelor. xiv+194 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (125 colour plates). 406 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918033. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918040. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Gwithian, on the north coast of Cornwall, is a multiperiod archaeological site. Excavations by Charles Thomas in the mid-twentieth century provided evidence of human activity from the Mesolithic to the post-medieval period. The present work explores the palaeoenvironment of the area around the settlement sites, from the Neolithic, when sand dunes initially developed in the Red River valley, to the present post-industrial landscape. Multiproxy analyses on sediments from coring, a test pit and mollusc columns provide a view of the changing landscape and how it may have influenced, or been influenced by, human presence and settlement. Mollusc studies are used as the principal analytical method. Multiple radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminesce dates permit these changes to be studied on a tighter time frame than was previously possible. Mining activity from the Bronze Age to the present is explored using fine-resolution geochemistry. Dating allows the timing of the extinction and introduction of some mollusc species to be refined.

About the Author
THOMAS WALKER is Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading. After a career in medicine he entered the world of archaeology in retirement, initially studying for a BSc at Reading and then progressing to a PhD. This monograph is based on his PhD thesis, which explored the palaeoenvironment of blown sands in Cornwall, principally at Gwithian. Table of Contents
NEW: People in the Mountains: Current Approaches to the Archaeology of Mountainous Landscapes edited by Andrzej Pelisiak, Marek Nowak and Ciprian Astaloș. viii+226 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 colour plates). 404 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918170. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918187. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Mountain landscapes were first exploited by farming populations at the very beginning of the Neolithic. However, there are controversies regarding when and where these specific types of human behaviour developed as a result of adaptation processes to these special environments.

The aim of People in the Mountains: Current Approaches to the Archaeology of Mountainous Landscapes is to present research results from different scientific contexts. To discuss these issues, and to study different aspects of human activity in the mountains and adjacent regions we incorporate archaeological, botanical, zooarchaeological and ethnological information. The chapters explore, among many other themes, several principal areas of research: environmental history and human impact in mountain environments; specificities of different mountain landscape zones; long-term changes of human activity in different mountain regions, and the origins of such changes; seasonal herding, and short and long-distance transhumance; exploitation of different raw materials e.g. siliceous raw material, salt etc.; mountains as borders, roads and zones of contact; creation of new customs, rights and social relations; symbolic and ritual locations in the mountains; dialogue between different methodological perspectives and analytical methods. The book consists of 15 chapters prepared by 27 authors from 10 countries. The chapter topics cover mountains located in Europe, America and Asia.

About the Editors
ANDRZEJ PELISIAK specialises in the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Central Europe. He gained his PhD in 1989. In 2001 he joined the University of Rzeszów and from 2005 he has been an associate professor at the UR Institute of Archaeology. He is an author or co-author of seven books and more than 150 papers. His archaeological interests are as follows: the exploitation and distribution of siliceous rocks during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age; production of lithic tools from Early Neolithic onwards; environmental and climatic changes during the Holocene and their connections with changes of human activity; Neolithic and Bronze Age settlements and economy; the archaeology of mountains. He has directed, co-directed or participated in several Polish and international multidisciplinary projects, i.e. Climate and environment changes recorded in the annually laminated sediment of Lake Gościąż (Central Poland) and Human activity in the High Bieszczady Mountains from the Neolithic onwards.

MAREK NOWAK obtained his PhD degree in Archaeology at Jagiellonian University in Kraków (Poland). Currently he is associate professor at the Institute of Archaeology of the Jagiellonian University. He writes and teaches on the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition and on the Neolithic of Central Europe (particularly on the Funnel Beaker culture). His research interests also include environmental archaeology. He has participated in a number of projects in Poland and abroad and has some 90 publications, including three books. Recent publications include co-editing Early Farmers of the Eastern Slovak Lowland: The Settlement of the Eastern Linear Pottery Culture at Moravany (edited by J. K. Kozłowski, M. Nowak, and M. Vizdal, Kraków 2015). Currently he is working on the book about Polish territories in the 6th, 5th and 4th millennia BC.

CIPRIAN ASTALOȘ obtained his BA degree in History at Babeș-Bolyai University in Cluj, Romania (1998) and a MSc degree in Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology at University College London (2010). Since 1999, he has been working at the Satu Mare County Museum, Satu Mare, Romania. His main research interests relate to the Palaeolithic and the Neolithic of the Carpathian Basin. Currently, he is working on a doctoral thesis at University College London on ground stones in the Neolithic of Western Romania.
NEW: The Roman Bridge between Dolni Vadin (Bulgaria) and Grojdibodu (Romania) by Dorel Bondoc. vi+108 pages; 174 figures (54 colour plates). 401 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 38. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918071. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918088. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman Bridge between Dolni Vadin (Bulgaria) and Grojdibodu (Romania) presents all the available data on the Roman bridge over the Danube which connected Dacia and Moesia at this point. The toponyms Vadin and Grojdibodu themselves mean ‘ford’, a crossing over water, in this case over the Danube. There have been no archaeological excavations at the feet of the bridge but the author has been able to propose positioning, scale and full reconstruction on the basis of a survey of existing remains, known road alignments, old maps and drawings as well as comparison with better-known parallels. The book also includes a catalogue of small finds deriving from the area of the bridge.

This bridge has been ignored for centuries primarily due to the absence of any mention of it in ancient sources, literary or otherwise. It was probably eclipsed by the fame of the bridge from Drobeta, which was constructed by Emperor Trajan between the two Dacian wars, and by the bridge from Sucidava-Oescus which was built later, in the time of Emperor Constantine the Great. Additionally, the bridge is located in a rather obscure place, hardly accessible in the modern era. This work restores this river crossing to its proper significance.

About the Author DOREL BONDOC is an expert archaeologist at the Museum of Oltenia, Craiova, Romania. He obtained a PhD in Ancient History (Roman Archaeology) from the University in Bucharest in 2004. Dorel is a director of the archaeological research projects on the sites of Cioroiu Nou, the fortress of Legio VII Claudia, and Racarii de Jos, the Roman auxiliary fort. Over time he has published many articles and studies, as well as several books.
NEW: Mosaici funerari tardoantichi in Italia Repertorio e analisi by Luigi Quattrocchi. iv+ 114 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (19 plates in colour). Italian text with English summary. 400 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917999. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918002. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The potential of tomb mosaics as an academic resource has often been underestimated and consequently they have only been partially analysed not only in Italy but also throughout the Western Mediterranean. This work is intended to shed a new light on these finds, which are often incomplete, lost, or little studied.

The first part of the book presents the history of previous studies on the subject and briefly explains the structure of the corpus. The corpus, in turn, is organised according to current Italian administrative regions, specifically: Sardegna, Sicilia, Puglia, Campania, Lazio, Marche, and Friuli Venezia Giulia. Every region is then further divided following current provinces and municipalities.

This work does not aim to present merely a compilation of data in a catalogue; thus the second part of the book focuses specifically on tomb mosaics found in the Italic peninsula and major islands, and provides information on their geographic distribution, dating, typology, place of discovery and iconography, and considers the potential identification of individual workshops.

The purpose of the book is to bring tomb mosaics to greater consideration, since they have not survived in academic literature to the same extent as did their rich villa or domus counterparts. This work does not therefore aspire to be a complete analysis of the subject, but rather a starting point which can be both useful and a stimulus for future studies.

Italian Description
Il mosaico funerario è una particolare tipologia musiva spesso sottovalutata e poco studiata. Le origini sono da ricercarsi, probabilmente, nell’antica regione della Bizacena, attuale Tunisia, a partire dagli ultimi decenni del III secolo d.C. Nel IV secolo iniziò l’esportazione dei cartoni musivi funerari nel resto del Mediterraneo occidentale, raggiungendo l’Italia e la Spagna; in entrambi i casi però il mosaico funerario non riscosse particolare successo. La richiesta maggiore di questo nuovo monumento funerario avveniva da parte dei cristiani, e solo in minima parte dai pagani. In questo libro si cerca di fare ordine sui mosaici funerari presenti nell’odierno territorio italiano, catalogando tutte le evidenze musive, sia oggigiorno scomparse che ancora in situ, per cercare di delineare un’analisi sul fenomeno che ha, in maniera seppur ridotta, investito la Penisola italiana e le sue Isole maggiori. Infatti le testimonianze musive si concentrano in zone dove particolari condizioni hanno permesso la loro messa in posa. La prima parte è dedicata al repertorio dei sessanta mosaici funerari dell’attuale Italia, ognuno catalogato secondo una scheda pensata e studiata per rendere più agevole possibile la consultazione. La seconda parte è invece incentrata sullo studio d’insieme del fenomeno dei mosaici funerari in Italia, nella quale si cerca di fare chiarezza e dare dei punti fermi su questa categoria di mosaici. L’analisi conclusiva cerca di spiegare il perché in Italia, pur essendoci condizioni apparentemente favorevoli alla produzione delle coperture tombali musive, non si siano trovati che poche testimonianze musive funerarie se paragonate a quelle ritrovate nel Nord Africa e in special maniera in Bizacena.

LUIGI QUATTROCCHI (1988) ha conseguito la Laurea Triennale in Beni Culturali presso l’università degli Studi di Cagliari, ha proseguito gli studi conseguendo la Laurea Magistrale in Archeologia presso l’Università di Pisa e ha concluso gli stessi con il Dottorato presso l’Universidad Carlos III de Madrid con cotutela presso l’Università degli Studi di Sassari. Le sue linee di ricerca si incentrano sullo studio del fenomeno del mosaici funerario all’interno del bacino del Mediterraneo occidentale e sulla produzione musiva della Sardegna, Spagna e Nord Africa.
NEW: My dear Miss Ransom: Letters between Caroline Ransom Williams and James Henry Breasted, 1898-1935 edited by Kathleen L. Sheppard. vi+310 pages; 5 black & white plates, 1 colour plate. 399 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917821. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917838. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Caroline Louise Ransom Williams (1872-1952) is remembered as the first American university-trained female Egyptologist, but she is not widely-known in the history of science. Her mentor was James Henry Breasted, well-known as the first American Egyptologist and founder of the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago. As long as they worked together and as much as they depended on each other professionally, Ransom Williams is little more than a footnote in the published history of archaeology. She was a successful scholar, instructor, author, and museum curator. She also had personal struggles with her mother and her husband that affected the choices she could make about her career. This book presents the correspondence between Ransom Williams and Breasted because the letters are crucial in piecing together and allowing an in-depth analysis of her life and career.

The written conversation, comprised of 240 letters between the two, shows that Ransom Williams had a full life and productive career as the first American female Egyptologist. Through these letters, we see part of a life that is unique while at the same time analogous to other professional women in the period. This edition is the first book-length discussion of Ransom Williams’ life and career.

About the Editor DR. KATHLEEN SHEPPARD is Associate Professor in the Department of History and Political Science at Missouri S&T in Rolla, Missouri, USA. She received her PhD in the History of Science from the University of Oklahoma in 2010. Her research focuses on the history of Egyptology in the US and in the UK, and especially women's roles in the discipline. She finds that telling the life stories of women in Egyptology is not only interesting, but it is also crucial to fully understanding the founding and development of the discipline. In her spare time, she is a mom, wife, and Ironman triathlete.
NEW: Manx Crosses: A Handbook of Stone Sculpture 500-1040 in the Isle of Man by David M. Wilson. Hardback; iv+182 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 388 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917579. £19.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917586. £15.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The carved stone crosses of the Isle of Man of the late fifth to mid-eleventh century are of national and international importance. They provide the most coherent source for the early history of Christianity in the Island, and for the arrival and conversion of Scandinavian settlers in the last century of the Viking Age – a century which produced some of the earliest recognisable images of the heroes and gods of the North; earlier, indeed, than those found in Scandinavia. This, the first general survey of the material for more than a century, provides a new view of the political and religious connections of the Isle of Man in a period of great turmoil in the Irish Sea region. The book also includes an up-to-date annotated inventory of the monuments.

About the Author:
David M. Wilson, Director of the British Museum from 1977-1992, is a leading authority on the Viking Age and has written a number of studies of the art and archaeology of the Anglo-Saxon period and the Viking Age in their Northern European context. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and lives in the Island.
NEW: Marcadores gráficos y territorios megalíticos en la Cuenca interior del Tajo: Toledo, Madrid y Guadalajara by Mª Ángeles Lancharro Gutiérrez. 346 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (222 plates in colour). 46 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917975. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917982. Book contents pageDownload

The aim of this work is to analyze Late Prehistoric graphical markers, comprising paintings, engravings, Megalithic elements, and other portable objects. All of them can be described as post-paleolithic or Schematic Art over various surfaces. The chosen area, the inland region of the Tajo inner basin (Spain), was especially appealing for several reasons, such as the lack of scholarship on the subject, the lack of information on the geographical location of the archaeological sites, and the extended ignorance about the sites’ materials and relationships.

The methodology is based on systematic registration of all archaeological sites. This is studied from an Archaeology Landscape perspective through Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis. It tests geographical markers according to their strategic location (pre-eminence and visibility) and their relationship with other funerary, habitable and resources sites. This has allowed parietal surfaces (megaliths, caves, shelters) and mobile pieces to be given coordinate position for the first time in the region, which has demonstrated abundant and complex prehistoric graphical markers. The results achieved allow the extrapolation of settlement models, explained in chapter VI. Generally, shelters divide the territory by geographical units where the settlers have access to a variety of economic resources and transit networks.

About the Author
Dr. María Ángeles Lancharro has a BA in History from the University of Alcalá (Spain) and received her PhD in Prehistory from the same university. Her research interests include landscape archaeology, megalithic territories and their symbolism, Prehistoric Rock Art in the Iberian Peninsula and Late Prehistory in the inner basin of the Tajo river. Additionally, she specialises in databases, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis. Her work is focused on territorial analysis from rock shelters, habitats, necropoli, areas of exploitation and resources. Dr. Lancharro has an extensive teaching experience and has participated in several excavations in Spain and southern France aimed at the compared study of Megalithic and Schematic Art. Her findings have been published in different peer-reviewed journals and books, and she has participated in a number of archaeological conferences.

Spanish description:
El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de los marcadores gráficos de la Prehistoria Reciente, entre los que se incluyen pinturas, grabados, elementos megalíticos y elementos mobiliares que responden a la descripción de Arte Esquemático o Postpaleolítico sobre diferentes soportes. Se eligió como zona de estudio la cuenca interior del Tajo a su paso por las provincias interiores (España), de especial interés por su carencia de valoraciones conjuntas y desde luego, por la escasa información acerca del posicionamiento geográfico de estos yacimientos y el desconocimiento bastante generalizado de sus contenidos y relaciones contextuales. El método de trabajo se ha fundamentado en la recogida sistemática de todos los yacimientos registrados. El estudio se ha llevado a cabo con nuevas tecnologías como los Sistemas de Información Geográfica (SIG), desde una perspectiva de la Arqueología del Paisaje. Se han efectuado diversos análisis establecidos sobre su posición estratégica (preeminencia y visibilidad) y su relación con otros yacimientos de carácter funerario, habitacional y recursos de explotación. Esto ha permitido que los soportes parietales (abrigos, cuevas y megalitos), así como piezas mobiliares, se hayan georreferenciado por primera vez en la región, dando muestras de la abundancia y complejidad de estas grafías prehistóricas.

Los resultados nos han permitido extrapolar modelos de implantación en el territorio, expuestos en el capítulo VI. En general, existe una tendencia a delimitar el territorio en unidades geográficas caracterizadas, en las que las sociedade
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NEW: Sites of Prehistoric Life in Northern Ireland by Harry and June Welsh. iv+236 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (47 colour plates). 398 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917937. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917944. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Much has been written about the history of Northern Ireland, but less well-known is its wealth of prehistoric sites, from which most of our knowledge of the early inhabitants of this country has been obtained. Until recently, the greatest sources for this information were prehistoric burial sites, which have been visible in our landscape for thousands of years and have attracted the attention of inquisitive people throughout this time, often removing items, or adding others and in doing so, making it difficult for later generations to sift through the evidence. Fortunately, sketches, notes and artefacts have been gathered by Ordnance Survey surveyors, antiquarians and archaeological and historical societies and these continue to be interrogated by modern archaeologists in their search for understanding.

A further problem has been the dependence on information about prehistoric societies from their burial sites. Very few sites where these people lived and worked were visible above ground and as a consequence, little was known about them. However, during the last few decades, large-scale infrastructure projects and associated archaeological investigation has revealed a wealth of information. Much of the detail has still to be published and made available for research, but has already enriched understanding of our prehistoric past.

This monograph brings together information on all the currently known sites in Northern Ireland that are in some way associated with prehistoric life. It has been compiled from a number of sources and includes many that have only recently been discovered. A total of 1580 monuments are recorded in the inventory, ranging from burnt mounds to hillforts. In addition to providing an inventory of all known sites, along with a selection of photographs and plans, the work also includes an introduction to the prehistory of Northern Ireland, an explanation of terms and a full bibliography. It should be considered alongside an earlier work by the same authors on prehistoric burial sites in Northern Ireland (The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland, Archaeopress Archaeology 2014). The aim is to provide a foundation for more specific research projects, based on a standardised format for this largely untapped resource and stimulate a renewed interest in the prehistory of Northern Ireland. Hopefully, this can then be considered along with our knowledge of the historical period to provide a more complete overview of the story of human activity in what is now Northern Ireland.

About the Authors: Harry Welsh is an archaeologist and historian and currently works at the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork at Queen’s University, Belfast. He has participated in and directed many archaeological excavations from Mesolithic to early modern periods and has published many books, articles and reports on archaeological sites and associated matters, as well as documenting and publishing on the history of the fire service in Northern Ireland. He has also managed the fieldwork activities of the Ulster Archaeological Society for many years and is an enthusiastic supporter of community archaeology projects.

June Welsh is a retired primary school teacher and has been a member of the Ulster Archaeological Society for many years. She has participated in a wide range of archaeological excavations and surveys, publishing many archaeological survey reports on the society website. She also took part in a research project funded by the Royal Irish Academy into prehistoric burials in Ireland. It was this project that led to her collaboration in the 2014 publication The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland, also published by Archaeopress, and this stimulated her interest in the life of prehistoric people.
NEW: Augustus: From Republic to Empire edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner and Jarosław Bodzek. iv+164 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 397 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 36. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917807. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917814. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Augustus: From Republic to Empire is the product of a conference entitled AUGUSTUS. 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD – 2000 years of divinity organised on 12 December 2014 by the Institute of Archaeology of the Jagiellonian University, the Centre for Comparative Studies of Civilisations at the Jagiellonian University and the National Museum in Krakow. The conference was hosted by the Emeryk Hutten- Czapski Museum – a branch of the National Museum in Krakow – and commemorated the anniversary of Augustus’s death.

The volume offers readers articles that deal with a variety of topics ranging from architecture, urban issues and painting to fine art represented by glyptics and numismatics. It includes papers devoted to the publication of previously unknown objects, articles presenting iconographic research, deliberations on propaganda, and analyses of the political situation and source texts. Chronologically, some of the papers go beyond the age of August, yet are relevant to the understanding of the transformations that took place in art and architecture during the reign of the first princeps, the widely-understood middle and late periods of the Republic, and the early Empire. The geographic scope of the articles covers the entire territory of the Empire. This diverse topic allows a variety of research themes on the epoch of August to be presented from a broad perspective.
NEW: Archaeological Data Recovery in the Piceance and Wyoming Basins of Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming edited by Matthew J. Landt. xx+358 pages; 142 illustrations, 109 tables (103 plates in colour). 396 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917951. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917968. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £58.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the United States of America, Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act requires that projects funded, authorized, or permitted by the federal government consider historic properties that may be affected by the development of those projects. To comply with Section 106, an interstate pipeline corridor in southwestern Wyoming and northwestern Colorado was surveyed to identify cultural resources and to evaluate them in terms of significance and potential listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Once sites were identified, a mitigation strategy was developed in coordination with the Bureau of Land Management. That plan prioritized important cultural resources within a regional archaeological context and included substantial excavations at 14 sites.

The archaeological excavations were successful in recovering the types of data necessary to address regional research issues that were raised in the project’s alternative mitigation plan. The data recovery effort included site-specific geophysical assessments as well as providing an opportunity to analyze the geology, fauna, flora, and tens of thousands of prehistoric and historical artifacts from the sites. While there is nothing about the number of artifacts that inherently adds to our understandings of past lifeways, the analyses substantially added to regional datasets for the Paleoindian, Archaic, Formative, Protohistoric, and Historical components. Specifically, the analyses addressed prehistoric chronometric and settlement patterns (Chapter 5), subsistence strategies (Chapter 6), lithic reduction strategies (Chapter 7), as well as synthesizing information for prehistoric hearths (Chapter 8) and architecture (Chapter 9). Chapter 10 focuses on the results of remote sensing at two sites. That is followed by regional syntheses of the prehistoric (Chapter 11) and historical data (Chapter 12). When combined with existing datasets, this synthetic work substantially improves the quality of regional archaeological interpretations. Given the results presented herein, it is clear that the mitigation approach within the pipeline corridor was successful in providing important archaeological information that advances local and regional understandings of past lifeways.

About the Editor
Matthew Landt has more than 20 years’ archaeological experience across the western and central United States. He has authored publications in regional and national journals and actively pursues the presentation of archaeological data to the public. He has worked at Alpine Archaeological Consultants since 2007. Alpine has provided cultural resource services for a wide variety of projects since their founding in 1988. During the past 30 years, they have completed numerous local, regional, and interstate projects and have a broad region of expertise, covering the Great Plains, Mountain West, Great Basin, and the Greater Southwest.
NEW: From the Fjords to the Nile: Essays in honour of Richard Holton Pierce on his 80th birthday edited by Pål Steiner, Alexandros Tsakos and Eivind Heldaas Seland. iv+118 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 colour plates. 395 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917760. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917777. Book contents pageDownload

From the Fjords to the Nile brings together essays by students and colleagues of Richard Holton Pierce (b. 1935), presented on the occasion of his 80th birthday. It covers topics on the ancient world and the Near East. Pierce is Professor Emeritus of Egyptology at the University of Bergen. Starting out as an expert in Egyptian languages, and of law in Greco-Roman Egypt, his professional interest has spanned from ancient Nubia and Coptic Egypt, to digital humanities and game theory. His contributions as scholar, teacher, supervisor and informal advisor to Norwegian studies in Egyptology, classics, archaeology, history, religion, and linguistics through more than five decades can hardly be overstated.

About the Editors:
Pål Steiner has an MA in Egyptian archaeology from K.U. Leuven and an MA in religious studies from the University of Bergen, where he has been teaching Ancient Near Eastern religions. He has published a collection of Egyptian myths in Norwegian. He is now an academic librarian at the University of Bergen, while finishing his PhD on Egyptian funerary rituals.

Alexandros Tsakos studied history and archaeology at the University of Ioannina, Greece. His Master thesis was written on ancient polytheisms and submitted to the Université Libre, Belgium. He defended his PhD thesis at Humboldt University, Berlin on the topic ‘The Greek Manuscripts on Parchment Discovered at Site SR022.A in the Fourth Cataract Region, North Sudan’. He is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Bergen with the project ‘Religious Literacy in Christian Nubia’. He is a founding member of the Union for Nubian Studies and member of the editorial board of Dotawo. A Journal of Nubian Studies.

Eivind Heldaas Seland is associate professor of ancient history and pre-modern global history at the University of Bergen. His research focuses on the relationship between ideology, trade, and political power in the Near East and Indian Ocean in the pre- Islamic period. He is the author of Ships of the Desert, Ships of the Sea: Palmyra in the world trade of the first three centuries CE (Harrassowitz 2016) and co-editor of Sinews of Empire: Networks in the Roman Near East and beyond (Oxbow 2017).
NEW: Great Waterworks in Roman Greece Aqueducts and Monumental Fountain Structures: Function in Context edited by Georgia A. Aristodemou and Theodosios P. Tassios. iv+258 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (52 colour pages). 394 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 35. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917647. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917654. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In recent years an increasing worldwide awareness of the importance of water management in the ancient civilizations has generated much new discussion on water archaeology in ancient Greece.

The present volume, Great Waterworks in Roman Greece, consists the very first presentation of large scale waterworks in the Greek provinces of the Roman Empire. As a collective work, it brings together a wide body of experts from the newly emerged and expanding field of water technology and water archaeology in Roman Greece, and it fills an essential gap in archaeological research and relative bibliography regarding water management and monumental water structures in Greece during the Roman period. Among the main goals that this multi-author volume attempts to succeed is to show that great waterworks (namely aqueducts and nymphaea) not only were novelties in the Greek provinces, both in form and function, but they also changed the architectural landscape of their surrounding environments, and they introduced the concept of luxury in the urban landscapes of Roman Greece. The discussed papers deploy along a wide geographical area, covering the roman provinces of Macedonia and Thrace, Epirus, Achaia, the Aegean islands and Crete, between the 1st century BC and the 4th century AD.

Collective studies such as this, not only will enlighten and promote the multifaceted significance of the archaeological remains regarding water management technology of the Roman period in the Greek regions, but they will also reveal the significant impact of the Roman technological heritage in the Greek territories.

About the Author:
Georgia Aristodemou is a Researcher of Roman Archaeology. She completed her MA and PhD studies at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Her research and publications focus on monumental architecture and the sculptural display programmes deploying on the facades of theatres and nymphaea in the Eastern Provinces of the Roman Empire, along with their impact and use in the formation of social, cultural and political identities in the provinces. She served in various museum projects and excavations throughout Macedonia and Thrace, especially in the region of Kavalla and the Island of Thasos. She participated at the research project for the exploration and restoration of the ancient theatre of Philippi and she is engaged with the project of studying the sculptural decoration of the monument. Since 2009, she is an academic member of the School of Humanities of the International Hellenic University (Thessaloniki, Greece), where she teaches courses on Roman Art and Archaeology of the Black Sea and the wider Eastern Mediterranean region and she coordinates the annual International Summer School on Ancient Technology. She is the author of a book on roman nymphaea and many papers on roman sculpture and architecture. She is a member of several Greek and International archaeological Societies and Associations.

Theodosios P. Tassios, Professor Emeritus of the National Technical University of Athens is an academic, civil engineer, author and writer. He is a member of the Academy of Sciences of Torino (IT), doctor honoris causa of Liege University (BΕ), S.E. University of Nanjing (CN), Democritos University (GR), Aristotle University (GR), Cyprus University, the National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, and the Panteion Unversity (GR). His teaching and publications extend in the areas of Soil Mechanics, Bridge Design, Dams and Tunnels, Concrete Technology and Ancient Greek Technology. He has also dealt with a wide range of scientific, technological and educational issues (European and national regulations, antiseismic protection, monument protection, public works), along with subjects of Ph
NEW: Between History and Archaeology: Papers in honour of Jacek Lech edited by Dagmara H. Werra and Marzena Woźny. x+516 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 393 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917722. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917739. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Between History and Archaeology: Papers in honour of Jacek Lech is a collection of forty-six papers in honour of Professor Jacek Lech, compiled in recognition of his research and academic career as well as his inquiry into the study of prehistoric flint mining, Neolithic flint tools (and beyond), and the history of archaeology.

The papers explore topics on archaeology and history, and are organised into three sections. The first contains texts on flint mining dealing with well-known mining sites as well as previously unpublished new material. The reader will find here a wide spectrum of approaches to flint mining, ways of identifying raw materials used by prehistoric communities, and an impressive overview of the history of research, methodology and approaches to flint mining in Europe, North America and Asia. The following group of papers deals with the use of flint by Neolithic and younger communities, including typological studies on trace evidence analyses as well as theoretical papers on prehistoric periods in Europe and the New World.

The final section consists of papers on the history of archaeology in the 19th and 20th centuries. Some deal with the beginnings of archaeology as a scholarly discipline, while others present significant research from different countries. Readers will also find papers on the development of archaeology in the second half of the 20th century, both in political and institutional contexts. The book ends with the memories, which bring the Jubilarian closer to the reader by viewing him through the eyes of his co-workers and friends.

About the Editors
Dr Dagmara H. Werra is an archaeologist and an ethnologist. She works at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences as an adjunct at the Autonomous Research Laboratory for Prehistoric Flint Mining. In her professional career Dr Werra deals with prehistoric flint mining, the use of flint in Metal Ages and in modern times (gunflints) and with the identification and use of siliceous rocks by prehistoric communities. She obtained a BA in ethnology as well as MA and PhD (2013) in archaeology at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun. She is a project manager on the characteristics of ‘chocolate’ flint, and is a participant of research on obsidian artefacts. Since 2017 Dr Werra is Editor-In-Chief of the Archaeologia Polonia journal. She participated and conducted archaeological research at numerous archaeological sites, including those associated with flint mining.

Dr Marzena Woźny is a historian and an archaeologist. Her research deals with the history of Central European archaeology, including studies on the relationships between scholars, the history of the institutions and the archaeological thought. Dr Woźny authored almost forty articles on these issues as well as two books – Between generations. An interview with Professor Jan Machnik concluded by Marzena Woźny and Włodzimierz Demetrykiewicz (1859–1937). A prehistorian from the turn of the eras. She graduated with a history and then studies in museology degrees at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow. In 2015 she obtained a PhD in archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. She was a trainee at the National Museum of Archaeology in Malta. She is currently working on a dissertation devoted to the history of archaeology in Lesser Poland in the 19th century. She is also interested in the history of gunflint mining. Marzena is head of the Archives at the Archaeological Museum in Krakow.

NEW: Latrinae: Roman Toilets in the Northwestern Provinces of the Roman Empire by Stefanie Hoss. ii+152 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). 378 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 31. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917258. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917265. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents a selection of papers and case studies first presented at a conference designed to focus on the toilets of the Northwestern provinces of the Roman Empire, taking place at Radboud University on the 1st and 2nd of May 2009. Papers demonstrate the value of scientific analysis of waste to understand the food habits and diseases of the Roman users of the toilet, while elsewhere questions on how to find the necessary expertise and financing for such investigations were raised.

It is impossible at this time to write a definitive history of toilets and toilet-use in Roman times. Much more research is needed to get a clear view of all aspects surrounding human waste removal during the Roman period. While the basics of the architectural aspects of Roman toilets are better known by now, other aspects have been only touched upon briefly. It is hoped that this conference and its proceedings volume will not be the last on this subject in the Northwestern provinces, but just a start for this interesting research topic.
NEW: Egyptian Predynastic Anthropomorphic Objects A study of their function and significance in Predynastic burial customs by Ryna Ordynat. iv+120 pages; 101 illustrations presented in colour and black & white (12 colour plates). 45 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917784. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917791. Book contents pageDownload

Anthropomorphic objects from the Egyptian Predynastic have been a topic of frequent study and debate, from the time they were first excavated until today. These objects, including human figurines, hippopotamus tusks, tag amulets and combs carved with the human image, continue to fascinate and perplex scholars today. Objects such as these form part of the extensive and distinctive iconographic imagery of Predynastic Egypt, and are often interpreted solely in the context of their symbolic or iconographic significance.

The aim of this study is to examine these anthropomorphic objects in terms of their original context in order to determine what role they played in Predynastic burials – a useful method, as most of these objects are found in graves. A database comprising all provenanced anthropomorphic Predynastic objects and their placement in the grave, in addition to the details of each grave, has been composed in order to conduct a detailed analysis. The analysis is geared to answer the question of whether it is possible to determine the function of these objects from the available data, and if so, what the results could tell us about burial practices and rituals in Predynastic Egypt.

It became clear from the results that the context, especially the specific placement of the object in the grave, can reflect significantly the meaning and function of anthropomorphic objects. The placement and function seems to have depended on the type of object: for instance, figurines had different placements and meanings to tusks and tags. Ultimately, it appears that anthropomorphic objects, especially figurines, were personal items with which the deceased were identified and buried by their relations and friends. They may have served as magical or protective items, or as representations of ancestors or the deceased individuals themselves. This conclusion is significant, as it confirms the previous assumptions about the functions of anthropomorphic objects in Predynastic graves through a thorough analysis of available data, making a contribution to our understanding of Predynastic burial rituals.
NEW: Shipwrecks and Provenance: in-situ timber sampling protocols with a focus on wrecks of the Iberian shipbuilding tradition by Sara A. Rich, Nigel Nayling, Garry Momber and Ana Crespo Solana. vi+66 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 colour plates). 42 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917173. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917180. Book contents pageDownload

Two of the questions most frequently asked by archaeologists of sites and the objects that populate them are ‘How old are you?’ and ‘Where are you from?’ These questions can often be answered through archaeometric dating and provenance analyses. As both archaeological sites and objects, shipwrecks pose a special problem in archaeometric dating and provenance because when they sailed, they often accumulated new construction material as timbers were repaired and replaced. Additionally, during periods of globalization, such as the so-called Age of Discovery, the provenance of construction materials may not reflect where the ship was built due to long-distance timber trade networks and the global nature of these ships’ sailing routes. Accepting these special challenges, nautical archaeologists must piece together the nuanced relationship between the ship, its timbers, and the shipwreck, and to do so, wood samples must be removed from the assemblage. Besides the provenance of the vessel’s wooden components, selective removal and analysis of timber samples can also provide researchers with unique insights relating to environmental history. For this period, wood samples could help produce information on the emergent global economy; networks of timber trade; forestry and carpentry practices; climate patterns and anomalies; forest reconstruction; repairs made to ships and when, why, and where those occurred; and much more.

This book is a set of protocols to establish the need for wood samples from shipwrecks and to guide archaeologists in the removal of samples for a suite of archaeometric techniques currently available to provenance the timbers used to construct wooden ships and boats. While these protocols will prove helpful to archaeologists working on shipwreck assemblages from any time period and in any place, this book uses Iberian ships of the 16th to 18th centuries as its case studies because their global mobility poses additional challenges to the problem at hand. At the same time, their prolificacy and ubiquity make the wreckage of these ships a uniquely global phenomenon.
Excavation of the Late Saxon and Medieval Churchyard of St Martin’s, Wallingford, Oxfordshire by Iain Soden. xii+86 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (22 colour plates). 392 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917661. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917678. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook excavations over 2003-4 at the former St Martin’s churchyard, Wallingford, Oxfordshire. St Martin’s, one of perhaps eight churches of late Saxon Wallingford, was located in a prominent position in the centre of the burh. No middle Saxon activity was found and the earliest remains consisted of a layer sealing the natural subsoil which contained a probable late Saxon lead cross. Earliest use of the churchyard has been dated to the late 10th to early 11th century by radiocarbon dating, and burials continued until the end of the 14th century, serving a dwindling parish population, before the cemetery rapidly fell out of use thereafter. No burials post-date 1412. Part of the cemetery has not been disturbed by the present development. The unexcavated areas and previous post-medieval and modern disturbances has meant the original size of the cemetery remains unknown.

A late Saxon mortar mixer found on the site has added to a growing number of this distinctive early constructional feature. While its presence indicates the vicinity of the late Saxon church, no foundations of St Martin’s church appear to have survived cellar digging and quarrying for gravel that occurred in the early 18th century.

Osteological analysis of 187 of the 211 excavated skeletons of the cemetery has depicted a lay population which was almost equally split between males and females, with only a slight bias towards males. Their distribution showed no observable cluster within the churchyard by age or gender. A high proportion of children is notable but newborns and very young children were comparatively rare. The significance of this is unclear since so many disarticulated remains were also present due to later disturbance. Both degenerative pathologies and inherited conditions affecting bone were noted, as were a high frequency of trauma, some of it violent. Generally the population could be shown to have led healthy early lives compared to other urban assemblages, although evidence of tuberculosis and iron deficiency suggest that living conditions and diet at the heart of medieval Wallingford were far from ideal.

Within the excavated area of the cemetery, a number of the burials demonstrated known pre-Conquest burial rites and there are some aspects which may be peculiar to the area, suggesting local variations to common rites. Eight pre-Conquest burials had their heads supported mostly by stones, but one had his head supported by two disarticulated skulls. One 30-40 year old male was buried wearing a pierce scallop-shell, presumably a pilgrim badge from Santiago de Compostella. Four burials were interred in stone-built cists and these ranged from a c1 year old to adults of both sexes. A further six burials lay in stone-built cists without a cover. All post-Conquest burials were earth-cut examples.
Il complesso monumentale di Baitokaike (Hoson Sulaiman – Siria) by Tarek Ahmad. vii+116 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (55 colour plates). Italian text with English summary. 391 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 34. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917746. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917753. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The architecture of the temple at Baitokaike shares the characteristics that are typical of the Phoenician region especially during the imperial era. Baitokaike corresponds to that Phoenician tradition, but our knowledge about the foundation of these shrines and their development is still limited. This study aims to deepen this topic, while proposing new chronological phases of the site, starting from the time when it was an open cult place, through the architectural analysis of its buildings. In addition, it reexamines the Seleucid and Roman privileges of the sanctuary in order to extend our understanding of the territory of Baitokaike: agriculture, production and trade, the connecting roads and transport to nearby urban centers. Finally, the study of the iconography of the Greco-Latin inscriptions on site reveal the nature of the Zeus cult at Baitokaike as well as the rituals and processions that took place in the sanctuary.

This monograph also contains three appendices. The first is a collection of the Greek-Latin inscriptions found on the site, and includes an unpublished inscription found on an altar in the sanctuary. The second appendix constitutes a numismatic study of 46 coins uncovered during the excavation of 2004. Finally, the last appendix presents a catalogue of selected archaeological finds like pottery sherds, bronze and bones objects.

Italian description:
Il complesso di Baitokaike (Hoson Sulaiman) è considerato uno degli esempi più peculiari di santuari rurali romani in Siria che pongono la problematica relativa alla creazione dei luoghi di culto extraurbani e il loro sviluppo architettonico durante il periodo classico. Questo lavoro si propone di affrontare tale problematica su un piano archeologico e storico esaminando nel dettaglio la morfologia spaziale e architettonica del complesso di Baitokaike tramite un’analisi comparata dei suoi edifici con altre strutture religiose siriane e dell’Asia Minore, e mediante una accurata classificazione delle sue evidenze epigrafiche, numismatiche e di altri materiali archeologici, per lo più inediti, provenienti dai recenti scavi nel sito. Il libro è teso a discutere anche lo status politico e amministrativo di Baitokaike e il suo territorio sacro durante l’epoca ellenistica e romana tramite uno studio epigrafico delle sue iscrizioni, soprattutto quelle relative ai privilegi concessi dai Seleucidi e confermati successivamente dagli imperatori romani. Il fulcro di questo lavoro, dunque, è quello di riesaminare l’architettura del complesso monumentale di Baitokaike e di proporre un suo nuovo inquadramento cronologico.

Tarek Ahmad è un assegnista di ricerca della Philipp Schwartz Iniziative della Fondazione di Alexander von Humboldt presso l’università di Heidelberg in Germania, dove esegue un progetto di ricerca sul tema: “Il paesaggio sacro rurale nella Siria romana; studio architettonico e paesaggistico”, sul quale ha pubblicato alcuni articoli. Ahmad ha conseguito il suo dottorato in Archeologia presso l’università La Sapienza (Roma 1) in Italia sotto la supervisione della Prof.ssa Eugenia Equini Schneider ed era un docente all’università di Damasco in Siria e membro di varie missioni archeologiche.
Manual de Egipcio Medio segunda edición by Carlos Gracia Zamacona. xiv+240 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish language throughout. 390 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917616. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917623. £8.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £14.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A second revised and updated edition of Carlos Gracia Zamacona’s Manual de Egipcio Medio [Handbook of Middle Egyptian]. The book is designed as a primer, written in Spanish, to learn Middle Egyptian (2000-1500 BC), which was considered by the Egyptians the ‘classic’ stage of their language, and a guide to read hieroglyphs. The grammatical explanation is accompanied by a full list of hieroglyphic signs (Gardiner’s plus recent refinements), basic vocabulary, gradual exercises (with translation), and a short, updated bibliography. The book’s main aim is didactic, but it also addresses the latest theoretical and methodological issues in Egyptology and Linguistics.

About the Author After studying at the La Sapienza University in Rome with Alessandro Roccati and at the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest with Ulrich Luft, Carlos Gracia Zamacona was trained as an Egyptologist and linguist at the École Pratique des Hautes Études, at the Sorbonne, Paris, to prepare a Diploma of Advanced Studies (DEA) in comparative grammar under the direction of Pascal Vernus, Professor of Egyptology. Since then, he has carried out individual research, one of them as a postdoctoral fellow at the Institut Français d'Archeologie Oriental, in Cairo, and has collaborated on different international projects, the most recent being the creation of an anthroponym base for the Giza project of Harvard University. He is currently an associate member of the Research Team 4519 Égypte ancienne: archeologie, langue, religion of the École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris Sciences et Lettres Research University.

Spanish description:
Este libro es circunstancial. Se podrá decir que todos lo son, pero éste me llegó por pura casualidad a raíz de unos cursos de lengua y escritura egipcia organizados por la Asociación de Amigos del Museo Arqueológico Nacional de Madrid en 2007. Mi intención inicial fue la de preparar un material para los participantes de los cursos, siendo consciente de lo difícil que es empezar a leer jeroglíficos y comprender una lengua muy distinta de la nuestra o de las que nos son familiares. Debido a la misma complejidad del egipcio, que en esto no difiere de cualquier otra lengua natural, así como a mi tendencia a acabar lo que empiezo, me encontré un par de meses después de finalizados los cursos con un manual de iniciación al egipcio medio, el estado de la lengua considerado «clásico» por los propios egipcios y en el que están escritos, sobre todo, los textos del llamado Reino o Imperio Medio, que se extendió, de manera aproximada, desde el año 2000 hasta el 1500 antes de Cristo.

Sobre el autor
Tras estudiar en la Universidad La Sapienza de Roma con Alessandro Roccati (egipcio medio e historia de Egipto) y en la Universidad Eötvös Loránd de Budapest con Ulrich Luft (egipcio medio y hierático), Carlos Gracia Zamacona se formó como egiptólogo y lingüista en la École Pratique des Hautes Études, en la Sorbona, París, para preparar un Diploma de Estudios Avanzados (DEA) en gramática comparada bajo la dirección de Pascal Vernus, catedrático de Egiptología. Desde entonces, ha llevado a cabo investigaciones individuales, una de ellas como becario postdoctoral en el Institut Français d’Archéologie Oriental, en El Cairo, y ha colaborado en diferentes proyectos internacionales, el más reciente la creación de una base de antropónimos para el Giza Project de la Universidad de Harvard. Actualmente es miembro asociado del Equipo de Investigación 4519 Égypte ancienne: archéologie, langue, religion de la École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris Sciences et Lettres Research University.
Durovigutum: Roman Godmanchester by H. J. M. Green. Compiled, collated and edited by Tim Malim. xxiv+460 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (67 colour plates). 389 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 33. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917500. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917517. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication presents the results of over 30 years of investigation into Roman Godmanchester, (Cambridgeshire), by Michael Green. The book accurately locates the 25 “sites” investigated, and pinpoints the trenches against the modern street layout. Although some sites covered large areas, many often had to be conducted as small trenches undertaken by volunteers. The origins for Durovigutum include evidence for Iron Age settlement which preceded two Roman forts during the 1st century AD. After its initial military establishment the book goes on to reveal the development of the Roman civic community and its cemeteries along Ermine Street adjacent to its crossing of the Great Ouse.

The town was surrounded by defences in the 2nd century and a wall in the 3rd century, its public buildings included a mansio, bath-house and brewery, aisled barns, basilica and several temples, and the socio-economic foundation of the community is explored with specific examples from excavated evidence including different types of domestic housing and workshops. A tavern, glassware-shop, dairy equipment, pottery manufacture and a smithy are detailed in this book, as well as analysis of land organization, infield and outfield agriculture, and a villa estate at Rectory farm. Specialist analyses include samian and coarse wares, vessel and window glass, coins, animal bone, dairy production, belief systems and burial practices, as well as the exceptional finds of a hoard of jewellery from one of the mansio pits, and a burial casket of wood and bronze.

Although partial or full reports of various excavations have been published in journals and monographs previously, this is the first time Green’s full body of work on Godmanchester has been collated and presented in one comprehensive volume. The book has not tried to include more recent investigations, and most illustrations are by Michael Green, drawn contemporary with his excavations.

About the Author
Michael Green was born in St Ives, Huntingdonshire, in 1931. His father was a dentist, a WW1 flying ace and a Colonel in the Northamptonshire Regiment, who died in action with the BEF at Ypres in 1940. Michael was brought up by his mother, going to King’s College Choir School, Felsted, before training as an architect and starting his excavations in Godmanchester in 1951. He joined the Ministry of Works in the early 1950s and was made a Senior Investigator of Historic Buildings at the Department of the Environment, before later becoming an Inspector of Ancient Monuments and Historic Buildings. He undertook rescue excavations at Whitehall Palace between 1960-62 for the Ministry of Works and London Museum, and helped in the redesign of the Jewel Tower on College Green opposite the Houses of Parliament. In 1990 he was a founding member and President of the Centre for Crop Circle Studies which sought a more systematic approach to understanding these phenomena, and he published many articles in the cerealogist. He was a frequent contributor to various magazines and journals, including the Illustrated London News, The Archaeological News Letter, and the Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, a society of which he was elected President for two successive terms 1980-85. He is a Chartered Member of the Royal Institute of British Architects and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. In 2008 he published a definitive history of Clapham, where he has lived for some 30 years.

About the Editor
Tim Malim graduated from the Institute of Archaeology, London in 1980 and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists, as well as Chair of the Federation of Archaeological Managers and Employers. He has conducted research in Chile, Peru, Sri Lanka and continental Europe, as well as the UK where his present role is Technical Director at SLR Consulting in Shrewsbury. In the 1980s and 1990s Tim w
The Lamps of Late Antiquity from Rhodes 3rd–7th centuries AD by Angeliki Katsioti. ii+676 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 384 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917463. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917470. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The city of Rhodes was an important harbour in the Hellenistic period, and although its political role in the Roman period was significantly diminished, it never ceased to be a key hub for trade. The catastrophic earthquake of 515 AD marked the transition from the Late Roman to the Early Byzantine period in Rhodes. The glorious ancient city shrunk in size; its streets, which had been laid out according to the Hippodamian grid, were encroached upon and large basilicas were founded on the sites of ancient sanctuaries. A significant portion of the city has been uncovered over the past few years by rescue excavation, revealing houses, mansions, streets and extensive cemeteries, all yielding a large quantity of finds. This study focuses on the recording, study and publication of the corpus of the Late Antique lamps dating from the 3rd to the 7th centuries as found in these rescue excavations in the town of Rhodes. The lamps of this period from Rhodes and the other Dodecanesian islands are nearly unknown in the bibliography. The aim here is to present the diachronic changes in the artistic sensibility and preferences of this particular market. An integral component in this process are topographical observations regarding the Early Byzantine town of Rhodes, giving some details about the extent of the building remains. In addition, facets of the economic and commercial activities of the island during Late Antiquity are highlighted. Subjects such as the transformation/adaptation of the ancient city to new circumstances are also debated. For some lamps, analyses of the clay have been undertaken and the results are presented.

About the Author
Dr Angeliki Katsioti works for the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports at the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese, as a Head of the Department of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Sites, Monuments, Research and Museums. Her main research interests are Late Roman archaeology, as well as Byzantine art and iconography.
Huosiland: A Small Country in Carolingian Europe by Carl I. Hammer. viii+250 pages; black & white throughout. 44 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917593. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917609. Book contents pageDownload

Discussed here is the landscape of western Bavaria in the early-medieval period, between about 750 and 850. The title of the study derives from several indications that a noble genealogia, the Huosi, were particularly influential there during the period. Huosiland may be the best documented European landscape of this time. This is due to the extraordinary cartulary or register of deeds prepared for the diocese of Freising by the monk, Cozroh, in the second quarter of the ninth century. The first part of the study (Contexts) describes Cozroh’s codex and Huosiland and then analyzes the main political, ecclesiastical, social and economic structures and features there, based upon the available historical and archaeological evidence. The second part (Connections) explores a selection of particular issues raised by specific documents or related groups of documents from Huosiland. The third part provides all of the voluminous and highly-informative documentary evidence for Huosiland, both from Cozroh’s codex and other sources, complete in full English translation. As a result, the reader is able to construct his or her own Contexts and Connections. A full annotated Bibliography of the relevant secondary literature is included as is a complete Gazetteer of the translated documents. The publication will provide a valuable resource both for advanced teaching and for scholarly research.

About the Author
Carl Hammer graduated from Amherst College (B.A.) and the University of Toronto (Ph.D.). He has also studied and conducted research at the universities of Munich, Chicago and Oxford. After a brief teaching career, he spent the balance of his professional life in international business with Westinghouse Corporation and the former Rail Systems Division of Daimler Benz. He is now retired. He has published four other scholarly monographs on early-medieval Bavaria, two of them with Archaeopress, and numerous articles in North American and European academic journals. He and his wife live in Pittsburgh but spend several months each year in Easthampton, MA, where he has acquired a new research interest in the Puritans of the Connecticut Valley and colonial western Massachusetts.

The Classification of Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Copper and Bronze Axe-heads from Southern Britain by Stuart Needham. 74 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 plates in colour. 43 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917401. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917418. Download

This work presents a comprehensive classification of the morphology of early metal age axe-heads, chisels and stakes from southern Britain. It is illustrated by a type series of 120 representative examples.

Despite their relative simplicity, flat and early flanged axes from Britain and Ireland show considerable diversity in form. The main variation lies in outline shapes and the classification scheme arrived at therefore depends on careful evaluation of condition, followed by rigorous analysis of shape using metrical ratios. This ensures objectivity in both the formulation of the scheme and future object attributions, for which guidelines are given. Comparative material in northern Britain and Ireland is systematically referred to and a few crucial Continental parallels noted. Hoards and other associated finds, essential in underpinning the chronology, are cited throughout.

The style sequence outlined spans nine centuries of evolution, a regional trajectory which was nevertheless inextricably tied to axe developments in northern Britain, Ireland and, to a lesser extent, the near Continent. While technological advance is apparent at the broad scale, this was not the sole driver of the style changes taking place.

The study will be indispensable for those researching early metalwork, those concerned with European Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age cultures and those interested in patterns of style-cum-technological development.

About the Author
Stuart Needham specialised in metalwork in his early career and has since diversified to cover many aspects of the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age of north-west Europe, involving themes such as deposition practices, metal circulation systems, periodisation, life- and refuse-cycles of material culture, exchange systems, maritime interactions and alluvial archaeology. Further publications have emanated from excavations at Runnymede Bridge and Ringlemere. A curator at the British Museum for thirty years before becoming an independent researcher, he co-founded the Bronze Age Forum in 1999 and delivered the Rhind lectures for the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland in 2011. He is currently Research Director of the People of the Heath project investigating Early Bronze Age barrows in the Rother Valley of East Hampshire and West Sussex.

ARAMAZD Subscription Portal for Online Access Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies (AJNES) edited by Aram Kosyan (Editor–in–Chief). ISBN 1829-1376-PORTAL. Book contents pageBuy Now

Welcome to the online portal for access to volumes of ARAMAZD: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies (AJNES). Please note this page is for existing institutional subscribers only. To start a new institutional subscription or for all private subscriptions please follow this link.

Established in 2006 by the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies in corporation with Institute of Oriental Studies and Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (National Academy of Sciences of Armenia) AJNES is the only periodical in the Republic of Armenia devoted exclusively to the investigation of ancient and medieval cultures of the Near East and the Caucasus. Articles appearing in its pages are contributions of scholars of international reputation in history, archaeology, philology, art, religion and science.

Archaeopress was pleased to take on publishing duties in 2017, handling subscriptions for future volumes and back-issue sales. Subscriptions are available in print and online.

Journal of Greek Archaeology Subscription Portal for Online Access edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). ISBN 2059-4674-PORTAL. Buy Now

Welcome to the online portal for access to volumes of the Journal of Greek Archaeology (JGA). Please note this page is for existing institutional subscribers only. To start a new institutional subscription or for all private subscriptions please follow this link.

An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora. the Editorial Board is headed by Professor John Bintliff (Edinburgh University, U.K. and Leiden University, The Netherlands).A full mission statement and information on the editorial and advisory board is available here.

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Worlds Apart Trading Together: The organisation of long-distance trade between Rome and India in Antiquity by Kasper Grønlund Evers. viii+214 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 plates in colour. 385 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 32. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917425. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917432. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Worlds Apart Trading Together sets out to replace the outdated notion of ‘Indo-Roman trade’ with a more informed perspective integrating the new findings of the last 30 years. In order to accomplish this, a perspective focusing on concrete demand from the ground up is adopted, also shedding light on the role of the market in long-distance exchange. Accordingly, the analysis conducted demonstrates that an economically highly substantial trade took place between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean in the 1st–6th cen. CE, altering patterns of consumption and modes of production in both India, South Arabia and the Roman Empire. Significantly, it can be documented that this trade was organised at the centres of demand and supply, in Rome and India, respectively, by comparable urban associations, the transport in-between being handled by equally well-organised private networks and diasporas of seagoing merchants. Consequently, this study concludes that the institution of the market in Antiquity was able to facilitate trade over very long distances, acting on a scale which had a characteristic impact on the economies of the societies involved, their economic structures converging by adapting to trade and the market.

About the Author
Kasper Grønlund Evers holds master’s degrees in History from Lancaster (UK) and Copenhagen, as well as a PhD from the latter. He has previously published a monograph on the Vindolanda Tablets and the ancient economy.