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NEW: Mapping the Past: From Sampling Sites and Landscapes to Exploring the ‘Archaeological Continuum’ edited by Michel Dabas, Stefano Campana and Apostolos Sarris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 94 pages; 35 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 676 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697131. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697148 . Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Session VIII-1 of UISPP 2018 in Paris ‘Mapping the Past’ brought together several contributions reflecting on the need to develop sustainable and reliable approaches to mapping our landscape heritage. The session was guided by the crucial concept termed the ‘archaeological continuum’. This concept can be defined as a proactive approach to landscape survey based on the summative evidence detected (or detectable) within the area under examination, reducing spatial and chronological gaps as far as possible through the intensive and extensive application of a wide variety of exploratory methods and analytical techniques. Research work across Europe as well as contributions presented in this session have demonstrated that it is now possible to explore the whole landscape of carefully chosen areas and study them as an archaeological continuum. Archaeological interpretations derived from this kind of approach can be expected to reveal different layers of information belonging to a variety of chronological horizons, each displaying mutual physical (stratigraphic) and conceptual relationships within that horizon. The raising of new archaeological questions and also the development of alternative conservation strategies directly stimulated by the radical ideas inherent in the concept of the ‘archaeological continuum’ are among the major outcomes of the session.

About the Editors
Michel Dabas is Senior Researcher and Co-Director of the Laboratory of Archaeology at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris (AOROC) where he develops approaches for the provision of interactive maps on the web (chronocarto.eu portal) and focuses on the application of geophysical methods for archaeological sites. ;

Stefano R.L. Campana is Professor of Landscape Archaeology at the University of Siena. His research is focused on the understanding of past Mediterranean landscapes from late prehistory to contemporary times. ;

Apostolos Sarris is ‘Sylvia Ioannou’ Professor of Digital Humanities at the Archaeological Research Unit, University of Cyprus and Research Director at F.O.R.T.H.: Head of the GeoSat ReSeArch Lab. He is an Adjunct/Affiliate Professor at Cyprus University of Technology and a Research Associate of the Department of Anthropology, the Field Museum of Natural History of Chicago, Illinois, USA. His research focuses on geophysical prospection, GIS spatial modelling and satellite remote sensing in archaeology.
NEW: The Turkish Long-Necked Lute Saz or Bağlama by Hans de Zeeuw. Paperback; 175x245mm; 138 pages; 70 figures, colour throughout. 675 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694321. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694338. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The saz or bağlama, a generic name for long-necked lutes in Turkey, plays an important role in the Turkish musical culture. It forms the core of all folk musical ensembles and orchestras and is a popular instrument in the arabesque, entertainment, and pop music. It is the instrument par excellence in Turkish music education and in the religious rituals of the Âlevi and Bektaşi. The saz or bağlama can also be heard as a solo instrument on international concert stages. Acknowledging the instrument’s unique place in Turkey, The Turkish Long-Necked Lute Saz or Bağlama, an updated and revised edition of the Dutch book Turkse Langhalsluit of bağlama, mainly focusses on its cultural and historical background while briefly discussing various saz or bağlama types and their construction, tuning, and playing techniques.

About the Author
Hans de Zeeuw began to take bağlama lessons and became interested in its long and fascinating history while working at the Free University in Amsterdam and studying at the Open University. This led him to decide to break of his studies and focus, for many years, on research into the Turkish saz or bağlama under the supervision of Dr Leo Plenckers of the Department of Musicology of the University of Amsterdam and Dr Okan Murat Öztürk of the Devlet Konservatuvarı of the Başkent Üniversitesi in Ankara. In 2009 he published De Turkse Langhalsluit of bağlama (Turkish Long-Necked Lute or Bağlama) with the support of the Dutch Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds. His lecture to the Uluslararası Müzik Kongresi in Istanbul in 2006 was published in Türkiyede Müzik Kültürü in 2011. A short article about the Ottoman tanbûr, The Ottoman Tanbûr. Introducing the Long-Necked Lute of Ottoman Classical Music, followed in 2018. İn 2019, his book Tanbûr Long-Necked Lutes along the Silk Road and beyond, supervised by Dr Saskia Willaert of the Musical Instruments Museum in Brussels, Dr Alper Maral of the Sanat Tasarım Fakültesi, Müzik ve Sahne Sanatları Bölüm, of the Yıldız Teknik Üniversitesi, and Dr Martin Greve in Istanbul, was published by Archaeopress in Oxford. At the moment he is working as a freelance researcher, living in Istanbul, on an in-depth study of the Ottoman tanbûr.
NEW: Places of Memory: Spatialised Practices of Remembrance from Prehistory to Today edited by Christian Horn, Gustav Wollentz, Gianpiero Di Maida, and Annette Haug. Paperback; 205x290mm; 164 pages; 56 figures, colour throughout. 674 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696134. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696141. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Places of Memory takes a new look at spatialised practices of remembrance and its role in reshaping societies from prehistory to today, gathering researchers representing diverse but complementary fields of expertise. This diachronic outlook provides important insights into the great variety of human and social reactions examining memory, encompassing aspects of remembering, the loss of memory, reclaiming memories, and remembering things that may not have happened. The contributions to this volume expand upon Pierre Nora’s concept of lieux des memoire (places of memory) and the notion that memory is not just stored in these places but activated through human engagement. The volume presents a reflection on the creation of memories through the organisation and use of landscapes and spaces that explicitly considers the multiplicity of meanings of the past. Thus, social identities were created, reaffirmed, strengthened, and transformed through the founding, change, and reorganization of places and spaces of memory in the cultural landscape.

About the Editors
Christian Horn is a researcher and lecturer at the Department for Historical Studies at the University of Gothenburg. His scholarship focuses on Scandinavian rock art and prehistoric conflict. He is the current research coordinator of the Swedish Rock Art Research Archives as well as an advisory board member. Currently, he develops Artificial Intelligence approaches to rock art in a project funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond (Sweden). This project includes conducting fieldwork at UNESCO world heritage site Tanum documenting rock art in 3D. He is a prolific writer in the fields of prehistoric conflict, rock art, and digital archaeology. ;

Gustav Wollentz defended his PhD in the summer of 2018 at the Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Kiel University, Germany, focusing on the relationship between difficult heritage and temporalities. He received his Bachelor and Master degree in Archaeology from Linnaeus University in Sweden. He was previously (2012-2013) involved in a research project led by Cornelius Holtorf and Anders Högberg at Linnaeus University, where he studied future perspectives within heritage management. During a period in 2018 and 2019, he was hired within the AHRC-funded ‘Heritage Futures’ project to co-author a chapter on ‘Toxic heritage’. He is currently project leader/researcher at the Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity. ;

Gianpiero Di Maida, born in Palermo (Italy) in 1980, has completed his Ph.D. at CAU Kiel in 2018, defending a thesis on the Lateglacial rock and mobile art record of Sicily, Italy. This work, recently published, has been awarded with the Johanna Mestorf Price 2019. He is currently serving as the scientific manager of the DISAPALE project at the Neanderthal Museum. ;

Annette Haug is professor for Classical Archaeology at the Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel. Her research interests concern visual culture studies on the one hand, questions of urban lifestyles and urban design on the other. After her habilitation in 2009 in Leipzig, Haug became Heisenberg fellow at the University in Munich (LMU). After receiving the professorship in Kiel in 2012 she became the co-coordinator of the graduate school ‘Human Development in Landscapes’. She has received an ERC Consolidator Grant for research into Decorative Systems in Pompeii and Herculaneum.
NEW: Egypt and Austria XII - Egypt and the Orient: The Current Research Proceedings of the Conference Held at the Faculty of Croatian Studies, University of Zagreb (September 17th-22nd, 2018) edited by Mladen Tomorad. Paperback; 148x210mm; 418 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 672 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697643. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697650. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The 12th Egypt and Austria conference (Zagreb, 17–22 September 2018) was organised by the Egypt and Austria Society and the Faculty of the Croatian Studies of the University of Zagreb. The event took place in the Croatian Institute of History (Opatička 10, Zagreb). The main theme of the conference was current research related to the interactions between Egypt and the states of the former Habsburg Monarchy and the Ottoman Empire up to the middle of the 20th century. During the conference more than 39 papers were presented, of which 26 are presented in this proceedings volume.

About the Editor
Mladen Tomorad is a senior researcher and professor of Ancient History at the Department of History, University of Zagreb. He has a masters degree in History and a PhD in Ancient History and Museology, and he has also studied Egyptology at the University of Manchester.
NEW: Excavations at Chester. The Northern and Eastern Roman Extramural Settlements Excavations 1990-2019 and other investigations by Leigh Dodd. Paperback; 205x290mm; 142 pages; illustrated throughout. 668 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 71. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696271. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696288. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations at Chester: the northern and eastern Roman extramural settlements presents the results of fifteen archaeological investigations carried out within the canabae to the north and east of the Roman legionary fortress at Chester between 1990 and 2019. The results demonstrate that there was sparse development of the canabae to the north of the fortress during the 1st and 2nd centuries; instead, this area was predominantly used for the extraction of building materials⁠ – sandstone and clay. By the 3rd century, the final phase of usage took the form of a small cemetery, the first to be examined in this area. Subject to more constraints, the sites investigated within the eastern canabae close to the fortress produced limited evidence for urban plot divisions, whilst those further east provided evidence for the division and management of agricultural land forming the prata legionis.

About the Author
Leigh Dodd has worked in the commercial sector of archaeology since the early 1990s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of sites including many of the Roman and post-medieval periods, several of which have been published in regional and international journals. Additionally, he has written many finds reports for a wide-range of clients. He is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.
NEW: IKUWA6. Shared Heritage: Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress for Underwater Archaeology 28 November–2 December 2016, Western Australian Maritime Museum Fremantle, Western Australia edited by Jennifer A. Rodrigues and Arianna Traviglia. Paperback; 205x290mm; 698 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 666 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916428. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916435. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Celebrating the theme ‘Shared heritage’, IKUWA6 (the 6th International Congress for Underwater Archaeology), was the first such major conference to be held in the Asia-Pacific region, and the first IKUWA meeting hosted outside Europe since the organisation’s inception in Germany in the 1990s. A primary objective of holding IKUWA6 in Australia was to give greater voice to practitioners and emerging researchers across the Asia and Pacific regions who are often not well represented in northern hemisphere scientific gatherings of this scale; and, to focus on the areas of overlap in our mutual heritage, techniques and technology. Drawing together peer-reviewed presentations by delegates from across the world who converged in Fremantle in 2016 to participate, this volume covers a stimulating diversity of themes and niche topics of value to maritime archaeology practitioners, researchers, students, historians and museum professionals across the world.

About the Editors
Jennifer Rodrigues graduated as an archaeologist in Australia before specialising her training at the University of Southampton’s Centre for Maritime Archaeology, England, in 2000, after which she joined the Mary Rose Trust. Upon returning to Australia, she worked as a heritage consultant in Victoria and New South Wales, investigating Indigenous heritage sites, before joining the Western Australian Museum as Curator, Collections Manager then Exhibitions Project Manager over 16 years. She completed her doctorate at the University of Western Australia in 2011, and was Editor of the Australasian Journal for Maritime Archaeology from 2012 to 2015. In 2019 she joined the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as Senior Curator of the Centre for Indigenous Knowledges.

Arianna Traviglia is the Coordinator of the IIT Centre for Cultural Heritage Technology (Italy). Trained as an archaeologist, her work primarily focuses on mediating the inclusion of digital technology within the study of archaeological landscapes, especially waterscapes and lagoon environments. From 2006 to 2015 she held positions as Postdoctoral Fellow in Australia at Sydney and Macquarie Universities, before re-entering European academia as recipient of a Marie Curie Fellowship in 2015. She is Co- Editor of the Journal of Computer Application in Archaeology (JCAA) and currently a member of the Management Committee of the EC COST Action Arkwork, and a PI on the H2020 NETCHER project focused on protection of endangered Cultural Heritage.
NEW: Wholesome Dwellings: Housing Need in Oxford and the Municipal Response, 1800-1939 by Malcolm Graham. Paperback; 205x255mm; 124 pages; 40 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £30.00. 663 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697353. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697360. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A shortage of affordable new housing, builders choosing to build larger, more profitable houses, and a diminishing stock of cheap houses for rent. All this sounds very familiar today, but at the end of the Great War, scarcely any houses had been built for four years and there was political pressure to build ‘Homes for Heroes’, impelled to a degree by fear of revolution. Council housing, supported by central government funding, was the chosen solution in 1919, and this study by Malcolm Graham, a leading Oxford local historian for many years, examines the consequences in Oxford, then a university city on the cusp of change. Behind the city’s Dreaming Spires image, housing for the working population was already in short supply, but an economy-minded and largely non-political City Council had always been reluctant to intervene in the housing market. In 1919, there was no hint of the city’s industrial future, and the City Council saw the replacement of substandard houses as its main challenge. The meteoric rise of the local motor industry in the early 1920s led to rapid population growth and created a massive new demand for cheap housing. Dr Graham examines the uneasy partnership between the City Council and Whitehall which led to the building of over 3,000 council houses in Oxford between the Wars. The provision of these ‘wholesome dwellings’ was a substantial, and lasting, achievement, but private builders were in fact catering for most housing need in and around the city by the 1930s. The notorious Cutteslowe Walls, built to exclude council tenants from an adjoining private estate, reflected the way in which the growing city was being socially segregated. Dr Graham provides a fascinating insight into how modern Oxford evolved away from the university buildings and college quadrangles for which the city is internationally renowned.

About the Author
Malcolm Graham gained a B.A. in History at Nottingham University and an M.A. in English Local History at Leicester. A qualified librarian, he became Oxford City’s first full-time local history librarian in 1970 and has been hugely active in Oxford and Oxfordshire local history ever since. He completed a PhD at Leicester University in 1985, and was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London in 1999.
NEW: Studies in Archaeometry Proceedings of the Archaeometry Symposium at NORM 2019, June 16-19, Portland, Oregon, Portland State University. Dedicated to the Rev. H. Richard Rutherford, C.S.C., Ph.D edited by Mario Ramírez Galán and Ronda Sandifer Bard. Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 120 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697346. £46.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697339. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume is in honor of the American scholar Rev. H. Richard Rutherford, C.S.C, Ph.D (University of Portland). It contains the papers presented at the Archaeometry Symposium in the 74th Northwest Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society (NORM) which took place in Portland (Oregon), June 18th 2019, covering a wide range of topics. The volume includes papers about the application of different techniques in archaeology in order to comprehend some aspects during and after the excavation, for instance, physics, chemical analysis, remote sensing, LiDAR, etc. This work compiles papers about sites from different places around of the world, Spain, Canada, Thailand, Lithuania or Russia.

The aim of the symposium was to facilitate communication between scholars from different places, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research.

About the Editors
Mario Ramírez Galán, PhD., is Adjunct Professor in archaeology at the University of Portland (Portland, Oregon) and PhD. in archaeology from the UAH (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid). He has participated in international and Spanish congresses and roundtable sessions. He has participated in several archaeological excavations in the United States in collaboration with the city of Salem (Oregon) to study several aspects of its cultural heritage. Furthermore, he worked at different Spanish archaeological projects, for instance, the battle of Baecula or Complutum. Additionally, he has published papers in some of the most important journals (Archaeometry and Archaeological Prospection), and also books about battlefield archaeology, landscape archaeology, new technologies applied to archaeology, and archaeometry. During the last years, his investigation has been focused on the application of different techniques to study the medieval siege of Alcalá la Vieja. Ronda Sandifer Bard, PhD., is Lecturer in Chemistry at the University of Portland (Portland, Oregon). Her research interests include carbanion chemistry, polymer-bound reactive intermediates, and archaeometry, particularly XRF analysis of metal and bone artifacts. Since 2014, she has helped lead the annual UP Pollentia Undergraduate Research Expedition at the ancient Roman city of Pollentia in Mallorca, Spain, where UP faculty-student teams work at the invitation of the Consortium of the Roman City of Pollentia and its Directors and in collaboration with the Pollentia Field School associated with the University of Barcelona.
An Educator's Handbook for Teaching about the Ancient World edited by Pınar Durgun. 148x210mm; 248 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. Print RRP £TBC. 670 2020. ISBN 9781789697605. Download Full PDF  

PDF eBook edition available to download now. A printed edition is due to publish in the near future.

With the right methods, studying the ancient world can be as engaging as it is informative. Many K-12 teachers, university instructors, and museum educators use hands-on, project-based, and experiential activities in their classes to increase student engagement and learning. This book aims to bring together such pedagogical methods and teaching activities about the ancient world for any educator to use. The teaching activities in this book are designed in a cookbook format so that educators can replicate these teaching "recipes” (which include materials, budget, preparation time, levels of students) in their ancient art, archaeology, social studies, and history classes. They can be implemented online or in-person, in schools, universities, libraries, museums, or at home. Find out more about the book and the contributors here.

About the Editor
Pınar Durgun is an art historically-trained archaeologist with a background in anthropology, cultural heritage, and museums, passionate about outreach and education. She received her Ph.D. from Brown University and has been teaching for about a decade in universities, museums, and school classrooms about archaeology and the ancient world. As a dedicated public scholar and educator, Dr. Durgun hopes to make academic information about the ancient world accessible, fun, and inclusive.
NEW: The Maltese Archipelago at the Dawn of History Reassessment of the 1909 and 1959 Excavations at Qlejgħa tal-Baħrija and Other Essays edited by Davide Tanasi and David Cardona. Paperback; 205x290mm; 188 pages; 192 figures, 27 tables (77 pages of colour). 667 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694932. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694949. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Maltese Archipelago at the Dawn of History. Reassessment of the 1909 and 1959 excavations at Qlejgħa tal-Baħrija and other essays is a collection of essays focusing on the reassessment of the multifaceted evidence which emerged by excavations carried out in 1909 and 1959 in the settlement of Bahrija, a key site for the understanding of the later stages of Maltese prehistory before the beginning of the Phoenician colonial period. The two excavations, largely unpublished, produced a large quantity of ceramic, stone and metal artefacts together with skeletal remains. The reappraisal of the material will shed light on critical moments of central Mediterranean prehistory. Main topics such as the Aegean-Sicily-Malta trade network, mass migration movements from the Balkans towards the Central Mediterranean and the colonial dynamics of the Phoenicians operating in the West are addressed in the light of new data and with the support of an array of archaeometric analyses.

About the Editors
Davide Tanasi is an expert of Mediterranean prehistory and archaeology of ancient Sicily and Malta, in which fields is has published several papers and monographic volumes such as: D. Tanasi, N. Vella (eds), Site, artefacts, landscape: prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta, Monza: Polimetrica 2011; D. Tanasi, N. Vella (eds) The late prehistory of Malta: essays on Borġ in-Nadur and other sites, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2015. ;

David Cardona is Senior Curator of Phoenician, Roman and Medieval sites with the governmental agency Heritage Malta. He is a specialist of Roman and Late Roman archaeology and in this field he is about to publish a comprehensive work on Malta entitled Roman buildings and their architecture in Malta. His research interests include landscape archaeology, archaeology of technology and architecture.
NEW: Building between the Two Rivers: An Introduction to the Building Archaeology of Ancient Mesopotamia by Stefano Anastasio and Piero Gilento. Paperback; 175x245mm; 220 pages; 136 figures. Print RRP: £34.0. 664 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696035. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696042. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Building between the Two Rivers aims to supply university students and scholars of Near Eastern archaeology with an introduction to 'Building archaeology' methods as applied to the context of Ancient Mesopotamia. It helps the reader understand the principles underlying the discipline, which deals with the registration and analysis of all building materials and techniques involved in the assembly and erection of a construction, and to outline what knowledge and skills are needed, beyond those that are specific to archaeologists.

The in-depth registration and analysis of building materials and techniques requires professional skills and experience, which cannot be achieved with only a standard university training in archaeology. However, archaeologists need to know the basics of the classification of building materials, their physical properties, the main techniques of their finishing, as well as the basic principles of statics. They should also be able to let architects understand how to better tune the registration of data to ensure a fruitful archaeological interpretation.

Due to the introductory nature of the book, contents are organised in didactic chapters, trying to cover all the main topics and displaying them by means of selected examples. Particular attention is given to the methods of the 'stratigraphic reading', which are discussed in a dedicated appendix authored by Piero Gilento. A thematic bibliography and a technical glossary complete the book, helping readers enhance their understanding of the subject.

About the Authors
Stefano Anastasio is an archaeologist who specialises in the Ancient Near East. He is currently storehouse-keeper of the archaeological deposits of the Superintendency for Archaeology, Arts and Landscape in Florence. He is also currently working on the implementation of the new Photo-Archive for the Archaeological Conservation Centre of the Superintendency ;

Piero Gilento is an Associate Researcher at the Research Unit UMR7041-ArScAn (France), co-director of the French archaeological mission in northern Jordan, and Principal Investigator of the ACTECH project founded by a Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship.
NEW: New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East Studies in Honour of Tony J. Wilkinson edited by Dan Lawrence, Mark Altaweel and Graham Philip. Paperback; 205x290mm; 346 pages; 181 figures, 22 tables, 10 plates (46 pages of colour). 662 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695731. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695748. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East is a collection of papers produced in honour of Tony James Wilkinson, who was Professor of Archaeology at Durham University from 2006 until his death in 2014. Though commemorative in concept, the volume is an assemblage of new research representing emerging agendas and innovative methods in remote sensing. The intention is to explore the opportunities and challenges faced by researchers in the field today, and the tools, techniques, and theoretical approaches available to resolve them within the framework of landscape archaeology. The papers build on the traditional strengths of landscape archaeology, such as geoarchaeology and settlement pattern analysis, as well as integrating data sources to address major research questions, such as the ancient economy, urbanism, water management and the treatment of the dead. The authors demonstrate the importance of an interdisciplinary approach for understanding the impact of human activity on shaping the landscape and the effect that landscape has on sociocultural development.

About the Editors
Dr Dan Lawrence is an Associate Professor in the department of Archaeology at Durham University and director of the Archaeology Informatics Laboratory, a specialist hub for remote sensing and computational approaches to the archaeological record. He has directed landscape survey projects across the Middle East and Central Asia, and is currently working on the publication of survey work in Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan. ;

Mark Altaweel
is Reader in Near East Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He has taught courses and conducted research on Near Eastern history and archaeology, using GIS, computational modelling, big data analytics, remote sensing methods, and socialecological theory. He has led many projects in the Near East while being also involved in various research projects on complex systems in other disciplines. ;

Graham Philip is Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology, Durham University. He has served as Editor of the journal Levant since 2008. He excavated the Chalcolithic / Early Bronze Age site of Tell esh-Shuna North in Jordan (1991-94) and currently directs a collaborative project with the American University of Beirut at the Neolithic and EBA site of Tell Koubba in North Lebanon.
NEW: Scelte tecnologiche, expertise e aspetti sociali della produzione Una metodologia multidisciplinare applicata allo studio della ceramica eneolitica by Vanessa Forte. Paperback; 205x290mm; 148 pages; 101 figures, 17 tables. Italian text. 660 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696691. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696707. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ceramic technology is a topic widely explored in archaeology, especially for its social inferences. This volume addresses the social aspects of production and the role of potters within prehistoric communities. The book focusses on the Copper Age when social complexity was incipient rather than developed, and ceramic production was not considered a formalised activity. Household and funerary pottery dated from the second half of the 4th to the end of the 3rd millennium BC unearthed from eight archaeological contexts located in the current area of Rome were analysed through a multidisciplinary study. An integrated approach of archaeometric investigation, trace analysis and experimental archaeology provided a framework of empirical data reflecting the transmission of technological choices among diverse ceramic traditions and the coexistence of different levels of expertise within productions related to household or funerary activities.

Petrographic analyses, XRF and XRD, led to an understanding of the ceramic recipes, their use and the firing technology used by Copper Age potters. The reference collection of technological traces relating to forming techniques, surface treatments and comb decorations allowed characterization of the craftspeople’s expertise. A potter’s skill is inferred in terms of the technical investment required at each stage of production or in shaping specific ceramic vessels. In light of these data, the pottery from the Copper Age contexts of central Italy suggests a recurring association between skilled productions and socially valued goods, as the vessels used in funerary contexts demonstrate.

About the Author
Vanessa Forte, following the completion of her PhD (2014) at Sapienza University of Rome, she spent two years as a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, Cambridge University. She currently collaborates to national and international research projects as a member of the Laboratory of Technological and Functional Analyses of Prehistoric Artefacts (LTFAPA), and is an Honorary Fellow at the Sapienza University of Rome.

Italian Description
La tecnologia ceramica è un argomento molto studiato in archeologia, soprattutto in relazione alla società. Questo volume si focalizza sugli aspetti sociali della produzione attraverso lo status dei vasai nelle comunità dell’Età del Rame, un periodo in cui la complessità sociale è incipiente e la produzione ceramica è considerata un’attività non formalizzata. La ceramica proveniente da otto contesti archeologici localizzati nell’area dell’attuale citta di Roma e occupati tra il IV ed il III millennio a.C., è stata analizzata attraverso uno studio multidisciplinare. Un approccio integrato di analisi archeometriche, traceologiche e archeologia sperimentale ha permesso di delineare le principali scelte tecnologiche di all’interno di diverse tradizioni stilistiche e la coesistenza di livelli di expertise artigianale nelle produzioni domestiche e funerarie.

Attraverso l’analisi petrografica, associata ad XRF e XRD è stato possibile definire le ricette ceramiche, il loro modo d’uso e le tecniche di cottura praticate dai vasai eneolitici. La collezione di riferimento, composta da tracce tecnologiche delle sequenze di messa in forma dei vasi, dei trattamenti delle superficie e delle decorazioni a pettine, ha permesso di isolare diversi livelli di expertise, definiti in base all’investimento tecnico richiesto per portare a termine specifiche sequenze di lavorazione nei diversi stadi del processo produttivo. I risultati di questa ricerca mostrano una relazione tra l’elevata qualità artigianale di alcuni prodotti vascolari ed i contesti in cui venivano prevalentemente utilizzati, come ad esempio le necropoli, in cui alcune classi di vasi in ceramica avevano probabilmente un valore sociale riconosciuto dall’intera comunità.

La Dott.ssa Vanessa For
Stone in Metal Ages Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 6, Session XXXIV-6 edited by Francesca Manclossi, Florine Marchand, Linda Boutoille and Sylvie Cousseran-Néré. Paperback; 205x290mm; 134 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (24 pages in colour). Papers in English and French. 659 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696677. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696684. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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Session XXXIV-6 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): ‘Stone in Metal Ages’ was divided in two parts. The first, ‘Late stone talks: Lithic industries in Metal Ages’, was concerned with knapping. The papers dealt with lithic technology, use-wear analyses and the relation between the decline of stone and the development of metallurgy. The second, ‘Let there be rock and metal: l’outillage en pierre des métallurgistes préhistoriques de la mine à l’atelier’, was designed for papers focussing on stone tools used for metallurgy. This publication combines these two parts. Despite the fact that metal took the place of stone in many spheres, the analysis of lithic products created during the Metal Ages has seen progressive development. Objects and tools made of flint, chert and other stone materials remain important components of the archaeological record, and their study has offered new perspectives on ancient societies. Not only have many aspects of the everyday life of ancient people been better understood, but the socioeconomic and cultural systems associated with the production, circulation and use of stone tools have offered new information not available from other realms of material culture.

About the Editors
Francesca Manclossi is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and she is affiliated at the Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem. ;

Florine Marchand is part of an experimental archaeology team investigating the pressure techniques with the collaboration of Archéorient of Jalès (Casteljau-et-Berrias, France). ;

Linda Boutoille held a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship and subsequently a Royal Irish Academy Research Grant, based at Queen’s University Belfast. ;

Sylvie Cousseran-Néré is an archaeologist of the French National Archaeological Research Institute (Inrap).
NEW: A Classical Archaeologist’s Life: The Story so Far An Autobiography by John Boardman. Paperback; 156x234mm; 271 pages; 43 illustrated plates, 28 in colour. (RRP: £25.00). 656 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693430. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693447. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A Classical Archaeologists’s Life: The Story so Far shows that a scholar’s life is not all scholarship, though much of this book is devoted to the writing of books and, especially, travel to classical and other lands. Boardman is a Londoner, born in Ilford and attending school in Essex (Chigwell). His teenage years were spent often in air raid shelters rather than with ‘mates‘ (all evacuated). There are distinctive ‘aunties’, the rituals of daily life in a London suburb. The non-scholarly figures live large in this account of his life, marriage, children, new houses. At Cambridge he learned about classical archaeology as a necessary addition to reading Homer and Demosthenes, even being obliged to recite the latter. And those were the days of Bertrand Russell’s lectures in a university reawakening after the war. Thence to the British School at Athens to learn about excavation (Smyrna, Knossos, later Libya). His return from Greece was to Oxford, not Cambridge, at first in the Ashmolean Museum, then as Reader and Professor. A spell in New York gives an account of the city before the troubles, when Petula Clark’s Down Town was dominant. There is much here to reflect on university life and teaching, and on the reasons for and problems with the writing of his many books (some 40), with reflection on the university, colleges and their ways. Travels are well documented – a notable trip through Pakistan and China, in Persia, Egypt, Turkey – with comment on what he saw and experienced beyond archaeology. A lecture tour in Australia provides comment beyond the academic. He visited Israel often, lecturing and publishing for the Bible Lands Museum. Several tours in the USA took him to most of their museums and universities as well many other sights, from glaciers to alligators.

This book is a mixture of scholarly reminiscence, reflection on family life, travelogue, and critique of classical scholarship (not all archaeological) worldwide, illustrated with pictures of travels, friends, home life, and, for a historian, a reflection on experiences of over 90 years.

About the Author
Sir John Boardman is one of the foremost experts on ancient Greek art. Having served as Assistant Director of the British School at Athens (1952-1955), he was Assistant Keeper at the Ashmolean Museum and later Lincoln Professor of Classical Archaeology and Art at the University of Oxford (1978-1994). He continues to work in Oxford, at the Classical Art Research Centre, where he is mainly preoccupied with the study of ancient gems.

Reviews
'Few who have investigated the world of classical archaeology over the past 60 years can have failed to benefit from consulting John Boardman’s many and varied publications. His central position continues to be paramount, and in this book we have his spirited account of his career, the researches he has carried out, the travels he has undertaken, and the home life and friendships he has enjoyed over the past 90 years.'—Brian A. Sparkes, Classics for All, August 2020
NEW: Αthens and Attica in Prehistory: Proceedings of the International Conference, Athens, 27–31 May 2015 edited by Nikolas Papadimitriou, James C. Wright, Sylvian Fachard, Naya Polychronakou-Sgouritsa and Eleni Andrikou. Hardback; 698 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (273 colour plates). Papers in English (with Greek abstracts) or Greek (with English abstracts). 655 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696714. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696721. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The numerous rescue excavations conducted in Athens and Attica by the Archaeological Service during and after the major construction projects of the 2004 Olympic Games brought to light significant new prehistoric finds which have transformed our understanding of the region in prehistory. However, despite their importance, the new discoveries had remained mostly unnoticed by the international community, as the results were scattered in various publications, and no synthesis was ever attempted. The goal of the 2015 international conference Athens and Attica in Prehistory, which was organized by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, the University of Athens (Department of Archaeology and History of Art), the Museum of Cycladic Art and the Ephorate of Antiquites of East Attica (Hellenic Ministry of Culture) was to gather scholars working in the region and present for the first time a survey of Attic prehistory which would include the most recent discoveries and integrate over a century of scholarship. The 668- page conference proceedings include over 66 papers in Greek and English with sections dedicated to topography, the palaeo-environment, the Neolithic, the Chalcolithic transition, the Early Bronze Age, the Middle and Late Bronze Age, as well as the contacts between Attica and its neighbouring regions. A series of new detailed maps, derived from an exhaustive GIS-related database, provide the most up to date topographical and archaeological survey of Prehistoric Attica. Athens and Attica in Prehistory provides the most complete overview of the region from the Neolithic to the end of the Late Bronze Age. Its importance goes beyond the field of Aegean prehistory, as it paves the way for a new understanding of Attica in the Early Iron Age and indirectly throws new light on the origins of what will later become the polis of the Athenians.

About the Editors
Nikolas Papadimitriou is a Research Associate and Lecturer at the Institute of Classical Archaeology, University of Heidelberg. Specializing in the prehistory and early history of Attica, death practices in the Bronze Age Aegean, Mediterranean interconnections, and the study of ancient craftsmanship, he currently co-directs research projects on prehistoric Marathon and Thorikos.

James C. Wright holds the William R. Kenan, Jr. Chair and is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania. He is currently director of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project and co-director of the University of Toronto Excavations at Kommos, both in Greece.

Sylvian Fachard, the former A. W. Mellon Professor of Classical Studies at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (2017–2020), is currently Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. He is the co-director of the Mazi Archaeological Project in Attica.

Naya Sgouritsa, Professor Emerita of Archaeology at the University of Athens, specializes in Mycenaean Archaeology. Since 2002, she has been director of the Lazarides excavations on the island of Aegina. Her main research interests focus on Mycenaean Attica, Late Bronze Age cemeteries and burial practices, pottery, and figurines.

Eleni Andrikou is the Head of the Ephorate of Antiquities of East Attica, Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports. She excavated at Arkhanes (Crete), and conducted numerous excavations in Thebes and Khaironeia (Boeotia), as well as in the Mesogeia and Laurion areas (Attica).
NEW: L’Egitto dei Flavi: Sintesi e prospettive d’indagine alla luce della documentazione papirologica ed epigrafica egiziana by Nikola D. Bellucci and Brunella L. Longo. Paperback; 156x234mm; 184 pages. Italian text.. 654 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 69. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696738. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696745. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

L’Egitto dei Flavi, providing synthesis and new prospects of investigation, offers an overall review of the various information obtainable from sources from the Roman province of Egypt in the moment of transition from the Julio-Claudian dynasty to the new Flavian dynasty. Within the investigations, an attempt was made to focus on the province of Egypt during the period of Flavian domination with the aim of providing a compendium and a more balanced examination of the technical and economic organization of the country in a historical period that still would seem complex to want to define in its entirety. This operation made it necessary to start from the various documentary sources (papyrus, ostraka, epigraphs and wooden tablets) which bore testimony of the aspects that were intended to be emphasized. The texts examined were therefore carefully selected in the context of the substantial material available.

About the Authors
Nikola D. Bellucci, master's degree in Classical Philology (Th. Papyrology) and master's degree in Archaeology and Cultures of the Ancient World (Th. Egyptology) at the Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, is today PhD f. and department member of the University of Bern.

Brunella L. Longo, master's degree in Classical Philology (Th. Papyrology) at Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna, currently teaches classical literature at the Filzi State High School in Rovereto (Italy). She has dealt with scientific popularization (with particular reference to Classical Philology and Ancient History).

Italian Description
L’Egitto dei Flavi, fornendo sintesi e nuove prospettive d’indagine, vuole ritenersi un pratico strumento riguardante le molteplici informazioni ricavabili dalle fonti provenienti dalla provincia romana d’Egitto nel momento di passaggio dalla dinastia giulio-claudia alla nuova dinastia flavia proponendo una revisione d’insieme specie di queste ultime. Nel corso delle indagini si è tentato di mettere a fuoco la provincia d’Egitto durante il periodo di dominazione flavia con l’intento di fornire un compendio e un esame più calibrato dell’organizzazione tecnica ed economica del paese in un periodo storico che ancora parrebbe complesso voler definire nella sua completezza. Tale operazione ha reso necessario partire dalle varie fonti documentarie (papiri, ostraka, epigrafi e tavolette lignee) che portavano testimonianza degli aspetti che si intendeva maggiormente porre in rilievo. I testi esaminati sono pertanto stati attentamente selezionati nel contesto del consistente materiale disponibile.

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) e dottore magistrale in Archeologia e Culture del Mondo Antico (Th. Egittologia) presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna, è oggi PhD f. presso l’Università di Berna. Autore di numerosi articoli scientifici, è anche membro di alcuni tra i maggiori istituti scientifici internazionali d’antichità.

Brunella L. Longo, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna, insegna attualmente Letteratura classica presso il Liceo Filzi di Rovereto. Si occupa inoltre di divulgazione scientifica (specie negli ambiti della Filologia Classica e della Storia Antica).
NEW: Demography and Migration Population trajectories from the Neolithic to the Iron Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 5: Sessions XXXII-2 and XXXIV-8 edited by Thibault Lachenal, Réjane Roure and Olivier Lemercier. Paperback; 205x290mm; 180 pages; 89 figures, 2 tables. Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £35.00. 653 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696653. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696660. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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This volume presents the combined proceedings of two complementary sessions of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): Sessions XXXII-2 and XXXIV-8. These sessions aimed to identify demographic variations during the Neolithic and Bronze Age and to question their causes while avoiding the potential taphonomic and chronological biases affecting the documentation. It appears that certain periods feature a large number of domestic and/or funeral sites in a given region and much fewer in the following periods. These phenomena have most often been interpreted in terms of demographics, habitat organization or land use. They are sometimes linked to climatic and environmental crises or historical events, such as population displacements. In the past few years, the increase in large-scale palaeogenetic analyses concerning late prehistory and protohistory has led to the interpretation of genomic modifications as the result of population movements leading to demographic transformations. Nevertheless, historiography demonstrates how ideas come and go and come again. Migration is one of these ideas: developed in the first part of the XX century, then abandoned for more social and economic analysis, it recently again assumed importance for the field of ancient people with the increase of isotopic and ancient DNA analysis. But these new analyses have to be discussed, as the old theories have been; their results offer new data, but not definitive answers. During the sessions, the full range of archaeological data and isotopic and genetic analysis were covered, however for this publication, mainly archaeological perspectives are presented.

About the Editors
Réjane Roure is Senior Lecturer in Protohistoric Archaeology at Paul Valéry Montpellier 3 University; she works in the Joint Research Unit ‘Archaeology of Mediterranean Societies’ (JRU5140-ASM). Specialist in Iron Age societies in Mediterranean Celtic, she works on relations between the Mediterranean and continental Europe, on contacts between Greeks and Gauls and on the ritual practices of ancient societies. Since 2002, she has directed excavations at the archaeological site of Cailar (South of France), where had been found human remains linked to the Gallic practice of severed heads.

Thibault Lachenal is a CNRS Research Fellow and manager of the ‘Society of Prehistory and Protohistory’ team of the ‘Archaeology of Mediterranean Societies’ laboratory (UMR5140-ASM) in Montpellier. Specialist in the Bronze Age in the North-Western Mediterranean, his work focuses on the study of material culture, settlement and selective deposition of metalwork. He has supervised and collaborated in several archaeological excavations in southern France, Corsica and northern Italy and is currently in charge of underwater research at the La Motte site in Agde, a submerged Late Bronze Age settlement.

Olivier Lemercier is Professor of Prehistory at the University Paul Valéry - Montpellier 3 (France), and director of studies for the Master of Archaeology and Doctor of Archaeology degrees sp. Prehistory, Protohistory, Paleoenvironments, Mediterranean and African. Specialist in Bell Beakers and more generally the Neolithic and the transition to the Bronze Age in Europe and the Mediterranean, he is member of the editorial board of the Bulletin de la Société Préhistorique Française, member appointed to the CNRA and the Scientific Council of the Inrap. Author or coordinator of five books and a hundred scientific articles. He is currently President of
NEW: Le commerce régional et international au Xe siècle en Syrie d'après le trésor monétaire de Buseyra et d'autres trésors de l'époque by Alaa Aldin Al Chomari. Paperback; 205x290mm; 420pp; 82 figures, 44 tables and illustrated catalogue. French text. 648 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695298. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695304. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The treasure of Buseyra is preserved in the museum of Deir az-Zour in Syria. The coins in the hoard cover a large period from the Sassanian Sovereign Khusrô II (590/1-628) until the terminal date 331H/ 941. These coins offer precious information, not only about a large number of mints but about the periods and quantities of minting activity.

This treasure is important because it is the first complete hoard of the 10th century discovered in the al-Djazīra area. According to Tomas Noonan, the Middle East and Central Asian hoards only amount to ten per cent of the treasures found in northern and eastern Europe and the Nordic countries. In comparing contemporaneous 10th-century silver hoards, and especially the relation between the numbers of coin dies and their representation of their products, we can obtain insights into the flows of money and the balance of payments for each area and each minting city.

Alaa Aldin Al Chomari is a visiting scholar at the Forschungsstelle für Islamische Numismatik, Tübingen University, developing a database for the recording of North Syrian coin finds in a project funded by the Gerda Henkel Foundation. Previously he was Professor of Islamic Archeology and History at the University of Aleppo and at the University of Damascus, Suwaida Branch.

French Description
Le trésor monétaire de Buseyra couvre une grande période étalée de la période du souverain sassanide Khusrô II (590/1-628) jusqu’à l’année 331H/941. La composition générale de ce trésor de 3108 dirhams, dont 531 sont fragmentaires, est la suivante : 3 pièces Sassanides, un dirham Arabo-sassanide, 3 pièces Umayyades réformées, 2 pièces Umayyades d’Espagne, 2762 pièces ʿAbbāsides, un dirham Ṭūlūnide, un dirham Ḥamdānide, 9 pièces Dulafides, 45 pièces Ṣaffārides, 40 pièces banū Bānīdjūr, 201 pièces Sāmānides, 2 pièces Sādjides, 2 pièces Zaydites en Djurdjān, 36 monnaies indéterminées ( monnaies totalement usées ou flans non frappés). Le trésor de Buseyra est l’un des trésors du Xème siècle découvert dans le domaine du califat ʿabbāside qui nous fournit le nombre entier des fragments qu’il contient. Ce trésor est conservé au musée de Deir az-Zour en Syrie. La quantité des pièces qu’il renferme offre d’utiles renseignements tant sur la diversité des ateliers monétaires que sur les années de frappe, dont certaines sont rares, voire inédites. Le fait qu’un grand nombre de pièces ont été frappées au même atelier, permet des observations d’ordre statistique sur la métrologie. Il faut mentionner la grande importance de ce trésor, car il est le premier trésor du dixième siècle, découvert dans la région d’al-Djazīra.
NEW: Ricerche Archeologiche a Sant’Andrea di Loppio (Trento, Italia): L'Area della Chiesa by Barbara Maurina and Carlo Andrea Postinger. Paperback; 205x290mm; 316 pages; 366 figures; Italian text. RRP: £50.00. 647 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695366. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695373. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Fifteen centuries ago, the island of Saint Andrew (Isola di Sant’Andrea), located in the basin of Lake Loppio, drained in 1956, was the seat of a fortified settlement, and in the Middle Ages a church dedicated to St. Andrew was built on its top. After sporadic discoveries beginning in the 19th century, in 1998 the Archaeology Department of the Rovereto Civic Museum began a research and study project on the site, comprising a series of summer excavation campaigns. The archaeological investigations, completed in 2017, have brought to light a multi-layered archaeological site with finds ranging from the prehistoric age to Late Antiquity, medieval times and even until the First World War. While the first volume (published in 2016) was about the results of the research concerning the 5th-7th century castrum, this second work takes into consideration the results of the archaeological research in the area of the church (Sectors C and C1).

Contains contributions by Milena Anesi, Maurizio Battisti, Cinzia Borchia, Roberto Cabella, Florence Caillaud, Sabrina Calzà, Claudio Capelli, Simone Cavalieri, Anna Maria Fioretti, Luca Gardumi, Stefano Marconi, Marco Morghen, Michele Piazza, Alberta Silvestri, Eleonora Tomasini, Fabiana Zandonai.

About the Authors:
Barbara Maurina is the Archaeological Conservator at the Rovereto Civic Museum Foundation. Since 1988 she has been part of archaeological campaigns in Italy and abroad, and from 1998 to 2017 she was the excavation leader at the site of Loppio-Sant’Andrea.

Carlo Andrea Postinger is a freelance medievalist who graduated in Medieval Archaeology from the University of Pisa in 1993. At the site of Loppio-Sant'Andrea, he assisted Barbara Maurina in the direction of the excavation of Sector C.

Italian Description:
L’isola di Sant’Andrea, situata nell’alveo del Lago di Loppio, prosciugato nel 1956, quindici secoli fa ospitò un insediamento fortificato e in epoca medievale, sulla sommità, una chiesa dedicata a Sant’Andrea. In seguito a segnalazioni e rinvenimenti sporadici susseguitisi fin dal XIX secolo, nel 1998 la Sezione Archeologica del Museo Civico di Rovereto avviò un progetto di ricerca e di studio del sito, concretizzatosi in una serie di campagne di scavo estive. Le indagini archeologiche, concluse nel 2017, hanno portato alla scoperta di un contesto archeologico pluristratificato, con testimonianze che vanno dalla preistoria all'epoca tardoantica, a quella medievale, per giungere fino alla Grande Guerra. Mentre il primo volume (pubblicato nel 2016) è stato dedicato ai risultati delle ricerche nel castrum di V-VII secolo, questo secondo volume prende in considerazione i risultati delle ricerche archeologiche condotte nell’area della chiesa (Settori C e C1).

Barbara Maurina è conservatrice per l’archeologia presso la Fondazione Museo Civico di Rovereto. Sin dal 1988 partecipa a campagne archeologiche in Italia e all’estero; nel 1998 ha iniziato gli scavi nel sito di Loppio – Sant’Andrea, conclusi nel 2017.

Carlo Andrea Postinger, laureato con tesi in archeologia medievale presso l'Università di Pisa nel 1993, da allora esercita la libera professione come medievista. Nel sito di Loppio-Sant'Andrea ha affiancato Barbara Maurina nella direzione dello scavo del Settore C.
NEW: A Biography of Power: Research and Excavations at the Iron Age 'oppidum' of Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979-2017) by Tom Moore. Paperback; 205x290mm; 626 pages, illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 621 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695342. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695359. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume explores the changing nature of power and identity from the Iron Age to Roman period in Britain. Presenting detailed excavation results and integrating a range of comprehensive specialist studies, A Biography of Power provides fresh insights into the origins and nature of one of the lesser-known, but perhaps most significant, Late Iron Age oppida in Britain: Bagendon in Gloucestershire.

Combining the results of a large-scale geophysical survey, with analysis of both historic and new excavations, this volume reassesses Iron Age occupation at Bagendon, revealing evidence for diverse artisanal activities and complex regional exchange networks that saw livestock, and people, travelling to Bagendon from west of the Severn. The results of excavation of two morphologically unusual, banjo-like enclosures, and of one of the previously unexamined dykes, has revealed that the Bagendon oppidum had earlier origins and more complex roles than previously envisaged. The volume also provides new insights into the nature of the Iron Age and Roman landscape in which Bagendon was situated. Detailing the discovery of two, previously unknown, Roman villas at Bagendon, this research also demonstrates the continued significance of this landscape in the early Roman province.

This volume redefines Bagendon as a landscape of power, which offers important insights into the changing nature of societies from the Middle Iron Age to Roman period. It calls for a radical reassessment of how we define oppida complexes and their socio-political importance at the turn of the 1st millennium BC.

Contains contributions from Sophia Adams, Michael J. Allen, Sam Bithell, Loïc Boscher, Cameron Clegg, G.B. Dannell, Lorne Elliott, Elizabeth Foulds, Freddie Foulds, Christopher Green, Derek Hamilton, Colin Haselgrove, Yvonne Inall, Tina Jakob, Mandy Jay, Sally Kellett, Robert Kenyon, Mark Landon, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Edward McSloy, Janet Montgomery, J.A. Morley-Stone, Geoff Nowell, Charlotte O’Brien, Chris Ottley, Cynthia Poole, Richard Reece, Harry Robson, Ruth Shaffrey, John Shepherd, Jane Timby, Dirk Visser, D.F. Williams, Steven Willis.

About the Editor
Tom Moore is an Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University. His research focuses on the western European Iron Age and approaches to cultural landscape management. He has published widely on Iron Age social organisation and conducted major field projects at Late Iron Age oppida in Britain and France, including at Bibracte, Burgundy. He is co-author of the textbook: Archaeology: an introduction.

Table of Contents:
Summary ;
Acknowledgements ;
Chapter 1: Research at Bagendon ;
Chapter 2: The wider Bagendon complex: remote sensing surveys 2008-2016 ;
Chapter 3: Before the ‘oppidum’: Excavations at Scrubditch and Cutham enclosures ;
Chapter 4: Revisiting Late Iron Age Bagendon ;
Chapter 5: After the ‘oppidum’. Excavations at Black Grove ;
Chapter 6: Iron Age and Roman ceramics ;
Chapter 7: Brooches ;
Chapter 8: Metalwork ;
Chapter 9: An analytical study of the Iron Age bloomery slag ;
Chapter 10: Coinage ;
Chapter 11: Coin moulds ;
Chapter 12: Miscellaneous material ;
Chapter 13: Radiocarbon dates and Bayesian analysis ;
Chapter 14: Dating the Roman fort at Cirencester ;
Chapter 15: Human Remains ;
Chapter 16: Faunal Remains ;
Chapter 17: Isotopic analysis of human and animal remains ;
Chapter 18: The plant and invertebrate remains (1979-2017) ;
Chapter 19: Putting the Bagendon complex into its landscape setting: the geoarchaeological and land snail evidence ;
Chapter 20: Viewsheds and Least Cost analysis of the Bagendon complex and its environs ;
Chapter 21: Geophysical survey at Hailey Wood Camp, Sapperton, Gloucester
NEW: Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 50 2020 Papers from the fifty-third meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held at the University of Leiden from Thursday 11th to Saturday 13th July 2019 edited by Daniel Eddisford. Paperback; 206x255mm; 364 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (127 colour plates). PSAS50 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696530. £69.00 (No VAT). £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £78.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies is the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. First convened in 1968 it is the only annual academic event for the study of the Arabian Peninsula that brings together researchers from all over the world to present and discuss current fieldwork and the latest research. The Seminar covers an extensive range of subjects that include anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, numismatics, theology, and more besides, from the earliest times to the present day or, in the fields of political and social history, to around the end of the Ottoman Empire (1922).

The 53rd Seminar for Arabian Studies was hosted by the University of Leiden and took place in the Lipsius Building from Thursday IASA. In total sixty-five papers and twenty-three posters were presented at the three-day event. On Friday 12 July a special session on the stone tools of prehistoric Arabia was held, the papers from this session are published in a supplement to the main Seminar Proceedings.
NEW: The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963-69: The Pharaonic Sites edited by David N. Edwards. Hardback; 205x290mm; 468 pages; 812 figures, 2 tables (16 plates in colour). 652 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 23. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696493. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696509. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Of the Nubian Archaeological Campaigns responding to the construction of the Aswan High Dam, the survey and excavations carried out within Sudanese Nubia represent the most substantial achievement of the larger enterprise. Many components of the larger project of the UNESCO – Sudan Antiquities Service Survey have been published, in addition to the reports of a number of other major projects assigned separate concessions within the region. However, the results of one major element, the Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia (ASSN) between the Second Cataract and the Dal Cataract remain largely unpublished. This volume, focusing on the pharaonic sites, is the first of a series which aims to bring to publication the records of the ASSN. These records represent a major body of data relating to a region largely now lost to flooding. This is also a region of very considerable importance for understanding the archaeology and history of Nubia more generally, not least in relation to the still often poorly understood relationships between Lower Nubia to the north and the surviving areas of Middle and Upper Nubia, to the south.

The ASSN project fieldwork was undertaken over six years between 1963 and 1969, investigating c.130km of the river valley between Gemai, at the south end of the Second Cataract, and Dal.
NEW: Ecclesiastical Landscapes in Medieval Europe: An archaeological perspective edited by José C. Sánchez-Pardo, Emmet H. Marron and Maria Crîngaci Țiplic. Paperback; 205x290mm; 246 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 651 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695410. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695427. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

By presenting case studies from across eastern and western medieval Europe, Ecclesiastical Landscapes in Medieval Europe aims to start a Europe-wide debate on the variety of relations and contexts between ecclesiastical buildings and their surrounding landscapes between the 5th and 15th centuries AD. The book contains 16 papers dealing with 11 very diverse regions: Transylvania, Western Bohemia, Switzerland, Tuscany, the Po Valley, Central Spain, Galicia, England, Scotland, the Isle of Man, and Ireland. The volume is divided into two main thematic sections. ‘Ecclesiastical Topographies’ comprises works exploring the spatial dimension of ecclesiastical architecture during the Middle Ages, particularly regarding the creation of the parish system and the relationship between churches and cemeteries. In ‘Monastic Landscapes’ medieval monasteries provide an especially interesting case study because of their recognised capacity to modify the surrounding environment. As a result of the convergence of these perspectives, the hope is that this book will offer researchers ample comparative evidence for understanding the universal elements of ecclesiastical landscapes which transcend both chronological and geographical limits.

About the Editors
José Carlos Sánchez-Pardo is Senior Researcher in Medieval Archaeology at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain). His research focuses on early medieval landscapes, with special attention to northwest Spain. He has a Master’s degree in medieval archaeology from the University of Siena (Italy) (2004) and a PhD in medieval history from the University of Santiago (2008). He was a postdoctoral research associate at the University College London between 2009 and 2014; he also led the Marie Curie CIG project ‘Early Medieval Churches: History, Archaeology and Heritage’ between 2013-2017, focussed on early medieval churches in Galicia.

Emmet Marron is Visiting Fellow at the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at Newcastle University. During his Marie Skłodowska-Curiefunded Individual Fellowship he considered ‘The Character of Monastic Landscapes in Early Medieval Europe’ (ChroMoLEME). He interrogated the image, commonly presented in hagiographical texts, that the earliest monastic foundations in the post-Roman West were founded in a ‘desert’ or wilderness location, through the application of landscape analysis and the adaptation of historical landscape characterisation to a continental context.

Maria Crîngaci Țiplic is Senior Researcher at the Institute of Social Sciences and Humanities of the Romanian Academy in Sibiu. She was awarded a PhD in medieval history from the ‘Lucian Blaga’ University of Sibiu in 2008. She has been the author and editor of several monographs, and has contributed academic papers, on the medieval history of Transylvania and church archaeology. Her current research focuses on the spread of Christianity and the medieval church in Transylvania.
NEW: Le verre de Sabra al-Mansuriya - Kairouan, Tunisie - milieu Xe-milieu XIe siècle : Production et consommation: vaisselle - contenants - vitrages by Danièle Foy with a contribution by Ian Freestone; preface by Faouzi Mahfoudh. Paperback; 300 pages; 111 figures; French text with abstract in English and Arabic. 650 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696615. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696622. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Islamic glass and its craftsmanship in the Medieval period are known almost exclusively from Middle Eastern literature. The study of the structures of the workshop and the very rich glass assemblage from Sabra al-Mansuriya (Kairouan), the Fatimid capital founded in 947/948 and destroyed in 1057, proves that Ifriqiya followed the technological evolutions of glass craftsmanship.

An examination of the furnaces and the various artefacts discovered highlights the double vocation of a palatial factory: to produce glass and glazed ceramics. From this particular workshop, installed in the wing of a palace, we found everyday glassware as well as more luxurious types, some with very specific forms, others reproducing models known throughout the Islamic world. These productions are local and imported – distinguished through morphological and chemical analyzes – and form the basis of a first typology of glass used in Ifriqiya from the 10th to 11th century.

Architectural glass, partly made on site, is also abundant. The crown-glass of different colours, used whole or in small fragments, adorned the openwork panel walls with various carvings. The windows and their glass offered a rich polychrome and a complex decorative syntax, reflecting significant technical mastery and the desire to display economic and political power.

About the Author
Danièle Foy is Emeritus Research Director at CNRS, Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France). Her work concerns crafts, trade and consumption of glass in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the pre-industrial period in the Mediterranean area.

Le verre islamique et son artisanat à l’époque médiévale sont presque exclusivement connus par la documentation du Proche-Orient. L’étude des structures de l’atelier et du très riche mobilier en verre de Sabra al-Mansuriya (Kairouan), capitale fatimide fondée en 947/948 et détruite en 1057, prouve que l’Ifriqiya n’est pas resté en retrait de l’essor de l’artisanat verrier. L’examen des fours et des différents artefacts mis au jour met en évidence la double vocation d’une fabrique palatiale : produire du verre et de la céramique glaçurée. De cet atelier particulier, installé dans l’aile d’un palais, sortaient des verres communs et d’autres plus luxueux, certains de formes spécifiques, d’autres reproduisant des modèles connus dans l’ensemble du monde islamique. Ces productions locales et les importations, distinguées par l’étude morphologique et les analyses chimiques, forment la base d’une première typologie des verres utilisés dans l’Ifriqiya des Xe-XIe siècle.

Le verre architectural, en partie fabriqué sur place, est également abondant. Les cives de différentes couleurs, utilisées entières ou en menus fragments, garnissaient des claustras de plâtre très ajourés et aux découpes variées. Les fenêtres et leurs vitraux offraient une riche polychromie et une syntaxe décorative complexe, traduisant une grande maîtrise technique et la volonté d’exprimer un pouvoir économique et politique.

Danièle Foy est directrice de recherches émérite au CNRS, Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en- Provence, France). Ses travaux concernent l’artisanat, le commerce et la consommation du verre dans l’Antiquité, le Moyen Age et la période pré-industrielle dans l’espace méditerranéen. Ses publications sur le verre islamique portent sur le mobilier de Fustat-Le Caire, Hadir et Damas en Syrie et Sharma au Yémen. En Tunisie, elle a principalement étudié le verre d’époque romaine provenant de Carthage, Pupput, Sidi Jdidi et Nabeul.
NEW: ‘Blood Is Thicker Than Water’ – Non-Royal Consanguineous Marriage in Ancient Egypt An Exploration of Economic and Biological Outcomes by Joanne-Marie Robinson. Paperback; 175x245mm; 246 pages; 21 figures, 14 tables (11 colour pages). 646 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 29. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695434. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695441. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Discussions on consanguineous marriage within Egyptology usually focus on brother-sister marriages recorded in census returns from Roman Egypt, or royal sibling marriages amongst the ruling Ptolemies. However, no wide-ranging review exists of non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt despite the economic and biological implications of such relationships. This is the first time that evidence for nonroyal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt has been collated from select sources spanning the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period and a method created to investigate the potential economic and biological outcomes of these unions, particularly beyond the level of sibling and half-sibling unions. The working definition of consanguineous marriage used throughout this study is that used by clinical geneticists: unions contracted between cousins biologically related as second cousins or closer biological kin. This research argues that for some families, and under certain conditions, consanguineous marriage was a preferred economic strategy in terms of gifts given at marriage and in inheritance, and that families who married consanguineously may have received greater levels of intra-familial support without the expectation of reciprocity. Although there may have been adverse biological outcomes arising from congenital anomalies and genetic disorders in the offspring of consanguineous marriages, the research suggests that it is unlikely that these physical or cognitive disorders were distinguished from other medical disorders in the general health environment of ancient Egypt. The investigation focuses primarily on ancient Egyptian documentary and archaeological sources, including human remains, and is informed by research on consanguinity from a range of disciplines including anthropology, demography, economics and pathology.

About the Author
Joanne-Marie Robinson is a Visiting Scholar at the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology at the University of Manchester. She has a research interest in non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean, and the socio-cultural and religious factors that influence this choice of marriage partner. Her work also considers the potential biological outcomes of consanguineous marriage and investigates the reception to congenital physical and cognitive anomalies in ancient Egypt. This book presents the outcomes of a research project. The author holds a PhD in Egyptology and has worked as a lecturer, writer and advisor for television and radio programmes focusing on religion and history.
NEW: Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East edited by Anja Fügert and Helen Gries. Paperback; 205x290mm; 130 pages; 97 figures, 5 tables (61 colour pages). 645 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696059. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696066. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Glazed bricks applied as a new form of colourful and glossy architectural decor first started to appear in the early Iron Age on monumental buildings of the Ancient Near East. It surely impressed the spectators then as it does the museum visitors today. Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East comprises the proceedings of a workshop held at the 11th International Congress of the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (ICAANE) at Munich in April 2018, organised by the editors. Over the last decade excavations have supplied new evidence from glazed bricks that once decorated the facades of the Ancient Near East’s public buildings during the Iron Age (1000–539 BC) and especially significant progress has been achieved from revived work on glazed bricks excavated more than a century ago which today are kept in various museum collections worldwide. Since the latest summarising works on Ancient Near Eastern glazed architectural décors have been published several decades ago and in the meantime considerable insight into the subject has been gained, this volume aims to provide an updated overview of the development of glazed bricks and of the scientific research on the Iron Age glazes. Furthermore, it presents the on-going research on this topic and new insights into glazed bricks from Ashur, Nimrud, Khorsabad, and Babylon.

About the Editors
Anja Fügert received her master’s degree in Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2005 with a dissertation on the Old Babylonian palace at Uruk. From 2005 to 2014 she was a staff member of the research project Tell Sheikh Hamad / Syria and in 2013 she defended her PhD on the Neo-Assyrian glyptics from this site. After working as a freelance illustrator in the Egyptian National Museum in Cairo she did a 2-year traineeship at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. She also taught courses of Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin and at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. Since December 2017 she is the head of the editorial office of the Orient-Department of the German Archaeological Institute. Together with Helen Gries, she initiated and directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur).

Helen Gries obtained MA in Near Eastern Archaeology at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität of Mainz in 2010. In 2011 she started her PhD as a member of the Graduate School ‘Formen von Prestige in Kulturen des Altertums’ at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität of Munich. In 2014 she completed her PhD at Munich with a dissertation on the Ashur temple at Ashur. She has undertaken fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Lebanon, and Jordan. In 2014 and 2015 she was postdoc researcher and lecturer at Institute of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Munich. Since 2015 she is researcher and curator for Mesopotamia at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. Together with Anja Fügert, she directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur), which is funded by the German Research Foundation since 2018.
NEW: Domi militiaeque: Militär- und andere Altertümer Festschrift für Hannsjörg Ubl zum 85. Geburtstag edited by Günther E. Thüry. 150 figures; 4 tables; 4 plates (86 colour pages). Papers in German (3 in English). 644 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 68. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695328. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695335. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is in honour of the Austrian scholar Prof. Dr Hannsjörg Ubl. It contains a tabula gratulatoria, a bibliography and 24 contributions covering a wide range of topics. The focus being Greek and Roman, the volume includes papers about the Langobards, renaissance replicas of classical sculpture, and the archaeology of World War I. The 'classical' papers deal with Greek and Roman art and art looting; dogs in Greek and Roman warfare; Roman looking-glasses; erotic inscriptions of Gaulish spindle whorls; military equipment and dress accessories; Roman military history and the non-military archaeology of Raetia, Noricum and Pannonia.

Günther E. Thüry is a lecturer at the Department of Classical Studies at Salzburg University, specialising in Roman cultural history, archaeobiology, epigraphy and numismatics. His bibliography includes some 300 publications, including books on ancient coinage, Greek and Roman environmental history, Roman diet and Roman eroticism.

German Description
Dem österreichischen Archäologen Prof. Dr. Hannsjörg Ubl ist diese Festschrift gewidmet. Sie umfasst eine tabula gratulatoria, die Bibliographie des Jubilars und 24 Beiträge, die sich mit einem weiten Spektrum von Themen beschäftigen. Während ihr Schwerpunkt auf der griechischrömischen Antike liegt, widmen sich Aufsätze von Michael P. Speidel auch den Langobarden, von Kurt Gschwantler renaissancezeitlichen Nachbildungen griechisch-römischer Skulpturfunde und von Rupert Gietl und Reinfrid Vergeiner der Archäologie des Ersten Weltkriegs. Die Arbeiten zur klassischen Antike behandeln Themen der griechischen und römischen Kunst (Claudia Lang- Auinger, Erwin Pochmarski); den Kunstraub im Altertum (Ernst Künzl); den Einsatz von Hunden im Krieg (Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry); römische Spiegel (Lawrence Okamura); erotische Inschriften auf gallischen Spinnwirteln (Günther E. Thüry); militärische Ausrüstungs- und Bekleidungsgegenstände (Thomas Fischer, Christian Koepfer, José Remesal Rodríguez, Bernd Steidl, Paula Zsidi); die römische Militärgeschichte (Martin Mosser, Bernhard Palme, Michael A. Speidel, Zsolt Visy, Ekkehard Weber); und die zivile Kultur der Provinzen Rätien, Noricum und Pannonien (Gerald Grabherr, Renate Miglbauer, Beatrix Petznek, Peter Scherrer, Gerhard Waldherr und Magdalena Waser).

Günther E. Thüry ist Lehrbeauftragter am Fachbereich Altertumswissenschaften der Universität Salzburg. Er arbeitet vor allem über Themen der römischen Kulturgeschichte, Archäobiologie, Epigraphik und Numismatik. Zu seinen ca. 300 Veröffentlichungen zählen Bücher über antike Münzkunde, griechische und römische Umweltgeschichte, römische Ernährung und römische Erotik.
NEW: Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos Studien zur Typologie, Provenienz und Herstellungstechnik von so genannter Weißgrundiger Ware, Applikenkeramik und Pergamenischer Sigillata by Asuman Lätzer-Lasar. Paperback; 314 pages; 18 figures, 4 tables plus 64 plates (74 colour pages). German text. 643 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696097. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696103. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos is the first comparative study of three ceramic ware groups, namely Appliqué Ware, White-grounded ware and Pergamene Sigillata, which appear in Ephesos (on the Aegean coast of modern day Turkey) but, until now, were considered to be products made in and imported from Pergamon; one ware group was even named after the city. However, using intensive archaeometrical analysis tools, such as thin-section and microscopy, this study seeks to demonstrate that most of the ceramic objects were produced locally. Futhermore, the book presents stunning new data that showing the very differing technical knowledge among the ancient potters of Western Asia Minor. Emerging out of the archaeometrical analyses, the book provides a list of concrete parameters for the identification of provenance in the field. Furthermore, this study encompasses the first typochronology for the three ware groups, which allows future excavations in the wider region to set up a fine chronology of their contexts based on ceramic evidences.

Asuman Lätzer-Lasar is currently a research associate at the Max Weber Centre for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies at the University of Erfurt. At the same time, she is also a member of the DFG-Center for Advanced Studies ‘Religion and Urbanity. Reciprocal transformations’. Previously, she has been the Assistant Director of the International Center for Advanced Studies Morphomata at the University of Cologne, where she also graduated in Archaeology of the Roman Provinces, Classical Archaeology and Ancient Sinology. Her PhD-project was financed by the a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School of the University of Cologne.

German Description:
Mit Die vermeintlich pergamenische Importkeramik in Ephesos konnten vorherige Annahmen in der Forschungsgeschichte zu der Herkunft der drei Warengruppen namens Applikenkeramik, Weißgrundige Ware und Pergamenische Sigillata, die als Importe aus Pergamon gehalten wurden, anhand von archäometrischen Analysen widerlegt und als lokal gefertigte Produkte identifiziert werden. Neben der archäometrischen Provenienzbestimmung wurden neue Erkenntnisse über das technologische Wissen der antiken Töpfer und zur Arbeitsorganisation in Werkstätten präsentiert. Die Auflistung von Unterscheidungsparametern bei Fabricuntersuchungen, sowie die Typochronologie liefern eine Grundlage für zukünftige Auswertungen von Fundkontexten des westlichen Kleinasiens während des Hellenismus und der frühen Kaiserzeit.

Asuman Lätzer-Lasar ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin am Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien der Universität Erfurt. Gleichzeitig ist sie Mitglied bei der DFGKollegforschungsgruppe „Religion und Urbanität: Wechselseitige Formierungen“ (FOR 2779). Zuvor war sie Geschäftsführerin beim Internationalen Kolleg Morphomata der Universität zu Köln. Sie studierte Provinzialrömische Archäologie, Klassische Archäologie und Ältere Sinologie an der Universität zu Köln und der Tamkang University in Danshui/Taiwan. Ihre Promotion wurde von der a.r.t.e.s. Graduiertenschule mit einem Vollstipendium finanziert.
NEW: Different Times? Archaeological and Environmental Data from Intra-Site and Off-Site Sequences Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 4, Session II-8 edited by Zoï Tsirtsoni, Catherine Kuzucuoğlu, Philippe Nondédéo, Olivier Weller. Paperback; 205x290mm; 136 pages; 39 figures, 10 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £32.00. 642 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696516. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696523. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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Different Times? Archaeological and environmental data from intra-site and off-site sequences brings together seven papers from Session II-8 of the XVIII UISPP Congress (Paris, 4-9 June 2018). The session questioned temporal correlations between intra-site and off-site data in archaeology-related contexts. The word ‘site’ describes here archaeological sites or groups of sites – usually settlements – that have undergone research in recent years and produced information on the duration and timing of human presence. Comparison with evidence from geomorphological and paleoenvironmental research conducted at various distances from settlements gives some interesting results, such as ‘missing’ occupation periods, distortions in human presence intensity through space as well as time, variability in explanations concerning the abandonment of settlements, etc. Examples presented here highlight: first, discrepancies between time records within built areas used for living and the surrounding lands used for other activities (cultivation, herding, travelling, etc); second, discrepancies produced by the use of different ‘time markers’ (ie. chronostratigraphy of archaeological layers or pottery evolution on the one hand, sedimentary or pollen sequences on the other hand). Although improving the resolution of individual data is essential, the authors argue that the joint and detailed examination of evidence produced together by human and natural scientists is more important for reaching a reliable reconstruction of past people’s activities. Both the session and the volume stem from the Working Group ‘Environmental and Social Changes in the Past’ (Changements environnementaux et sociétés dans le passé) in the research framework of the Cluster of Excellence ‘Dynamite’ (Territorial and Spatial Dynamics) of the University Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne (ANR-11-LABX-0046, Investissements d’Avenir).

About the Editors
Zoï Tsirtsoni is an archaeologist and researcher at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), currently in position at the laboratory Archéologies et Sciences de l’Antiquité at Nanterre. She is a specialist in Aegean and Balkan prehistory and co-director, since 2008, of the Greek-French research project at the tell settlement of Dikili Tash in Greek Eastern Macedonia. Concerned with relative and absolute chronology, crafts (especially pottery), settlement, and problems of archaeological visibility, she has coordinated or participated in several collaborative interdisciplinary research projects (e.g. ANR ‘Balkans 4000’, ERC ‘PlantCult’), already published or in progress.

Catherine Kuzucuoğlu is a geomorphologist at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique). Working in the fields of physical geography, geoarchaeology, volcanism and reconstruction of past climates and environments, she develops collaboration research programs with Turkish and international teams in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Anatolia, investigating (1) Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of valleys and lakes, (2) geomorphological records of recent volcanic activity and landscape evolution, (3) reconstructions of climate and environment from lake and marsh records, and their impacts on past civilizations. She has been Deputy Director in charge of Archaeology at French Institute for Anatolian Studies in Istanbul (2000- 2003), and Director of Laboratory of Physical Geography (2009-2013).

Philippe Nondédéo is currently an investigator at the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Sc