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NEW: Ash-Sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East Vol 3 No 1-2 2019 Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+120 pages; illustrated throughout (28 pages in colour). 3 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692006. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692013. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Please note printed issues 1-2 are despatched as two individual volumes. Upon completion the digital journal is presented in one volume containing both issues (digital file currently contains only Vol 3 No 1; Vol 3 No 2 expected in Autumn 2019).

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NEW: Archéologie de la Bible hébraïque Culture scribale et Yahwismes by Christophe Lemardelé. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+116 pages; 2 colour plates. 553 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692280. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692297. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Since the Renaissance, the question of how the Bible was written has been much debated. Documentary theory of the end of the 19th century identified "authors" and schools of writing, paving the way so that, a century later, a complex reality emerged, that of scribes modifying texts as they copied them. Thus, “The Bible” no longer appears as a controlled theological and historiographical project but as the empirical arrangement of heterogeneous texts linked together by an evolving religious ideology. While the great overall account of the first books is based on the election and migration of an entire people, the ideological foundations of Yahwism evoke rather a foreign god who, having reached Israelite territory, ultimately gained pre-eminence there.

This monotheistic ideology was above all an exclusivism that was to be reinforced from the time of the kings of Israel and Judah to the Judean revolts against Rome in the first centuries of our era. In our attempt to understand the nature and origin, as well as the evolution, of this specific form of monotheism, which made of a jealous god the only God, we have relied predominantly on the concept of the “two yahwisms”. This theory enables us to understand how a god allied with a people has also been a creative god of the universe and of all humanity.

Après la formidable avancée que fut la théorie documentaire à la fin du xixe siècle, identifiant des « auteurs » et des écoles de rédaction, un siècle plus tard, la théorie a laissé de plus en plus la place à un réel complexe, celui des scribes modifiant les textes à mesure qu’ils les copiaient. « La Bible » n’apparaît plus alors comme étant un projet théologique et historiographique maîtrisé mais comme l’agencement empirique de textes hétérogènes reliés entre eux par une idéologie religieuse évolutive. Si le grand récit d’ensemble des premiers livres se construit sur l’élection et la migration d’un peuple en son entier, les fondements idéologiques du yahwisme font plutôt état d’un dieu étranger qui serait parvenu jusqu’en terre israélite pour, à terme, s’y imposer.

Cette idéologie monothéiste fut surtout un exclusivisme qui se renforça de l’époque des rois d’Israël et de Juda jusqu’aux révoltes judéennes contre Rome aux premiers siècles de notre ère. Pour tenter de saisir la nature et l’origine, ainsi que l’évolution, de cette forme spécifique de monothéisme, qui a fait d’un dieu jaloux le seul Dieu, nous nous sommes appuyé avant tout sur le concept des « deux yahwismes ». Cette théorie permet en effet de comprendre comment un dieu faisant alliance avec un peuple en particulier a pu être également un dieu créateur de l’univers et de l’humanité entière.

About the Author
Christophe Lemardelé has a PhD in religious sciences (2007) and the title of “Élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jerusalem” (2002-2003). He has directed seminars at the École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris, from 2011 to 2016, and published Les cheveux du Nazir in 2016, as well as numerous articles in philology, exegesis and the history of religions.

Docteur en Sciences religieuses (2007), élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jérusalem (2002-2003), l’auteur a été chargé de conférences à l’École pratique des hautes études à Paris, de 2011 à 2016, et a notamment publié Les cheveux du Nazir en 2016, ainsi que de nombreux articles philologiques, d’exégèse et d’histoire des religions. Docteur en Sciences religieuses (2007), élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jérusalem (2002-2003), l’auteur a été chargé de conférences à l’École pratique des hautes études à Paris, de 2011 à 2016, et a notamment publié Les cheveux du Nazir en 2016, ainsi que de nombreux articles philologiques, d’exégèse et d’histoire des religions.
NEW: Hadrian’s Wall: A study in archaeological exploration and interpretation by David J. Breeze. Paperback; 175x245mm; vi+190 pages; 125 figures, 4 tables (79 plates in colour). (Print RRP £19.99). 543 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691672. £19.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691689. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The lectures on which this publication is based were delivered as the Rhind Lectures to the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland in May 2019. The annual Rhind Lectures commemorate Alexander Henry Rhind (1833-1863), a Fellow of the Society renowned for his excavations (finds from which are now in the National Museum of Scotland) and publications. The 2019 lectures were generously sponsored by AOC Archaeology Group.

The first two lectures – chapters in this book – provide the historiographical background to our present understanding of Hadrian’s Wall. They start with John Collingwood Bruce, the leading authority on the Wall, from 1848 until his death in 1892, who gave the Rhind lectures in 1883 and whose influence continues to this day. Research on the Wall in the field and in the study from 1892 to the present day are covered in the second lecture. The third and fourth lectures consider the purpose(s) and operation of Hadrian’s Wall from the first plan drawn up soon after Hadrian became emperor in 117 through to the final days of its existence as a frontier shortly after 400. Five distinct ‘plans’ for the Wall are promulgated. The fifth lecture examines the impact of the frontier on the people living in its shadow and beyond. The last lecture reviews the processes which have brought us to an understanding of Hadrian’s Wall and considers the value of research strategies, with some suggestions for the way forward. The chapters in this book reflect closely the lectures themselves with the main change being the addition of references.

About the Author
DAVID J. BREEZE has been a trustee of the Senhouse Museum Trust since its inception in 1985 and chair of the trust since 2013. He has served as President of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society and as Chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier. He was Chief Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Scotland from 1989 to 2005, and subsequently led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site in 2008. David has excavated on both Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall and written several books on these frontiers, on frontiers elsewhere in the Roman Empire and on the Roman army.
NEW: The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Text and Archaeology by Justin L. Kelley. Paperback; 175x245mm; 47 figures, 1 table (Black & white throughout). (Print RRP £48.00). 489 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690569. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690576. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, was built by the Byzantine emperor Constantine I to commemorate the Passion of Jesus Christ. Encased within its walls are the archaeological remains of a small piece of ancient Jerusalem ranging in date from the 8th century BC through the 16th century AD, at which time the Turkish Ottoman Empire ushered Jerusalem into the modern period. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was the subject of extensive archaeological investigation between 1960 and 1981 during its restoration. With the development of non-destructive techniques of archaeological research, investigation within the church has continued, which led to the restoration and conservation of the shrine built over the Tomb of Jesus in 2017. The first part of this monograph focuses on the archaeological record of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, surveying past excavations as well as recent research carried out within the church over the past three decades. The archaeological survey provides historical context for the second part of the book—a collection of primary sources pertinent to the history of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The texts included here range in date from the 1st century AD to the mid-19th century and are presented in their original languages with English translation.

About the Author
JUSTIN L. KELLEY teaches classes in Christian history and biblical studies at Life Pacific College. Justin specializes in the history and culture of the ancient Near East and spent several years as a student in Israel, where he studied biblical historical geography and archaeology at Jerusalem University College and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
NEW: El sol, símbolo de continuidad y permanencia: un estudio multidisciplinar sobre la figura soliforme en el arte esquemático de la Provincia de Cádiz by Mercedes Versaci. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+208 pages; 156 figures, 38 tables (151 colour pages); Spanish text. 89 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691948. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691955. Book contents pageDownload

The purpose of this study is to analyze the soliform figures in schematic cave paintings. The author presents research on all the global factors relevant to the study of these figures (technological, typological, stylistic, semiotic, astronomical, anthropological and landscape) and their relationship with the whole of schematic rock paintings and the societies that produced them. The geographical scope of the study is the area of Laguna de la Janda and Campo de Gibraltar (Cadiz).

One of the arguments the author maintains in this research is the shortage of studies conducted in the territory of Cadiz in relation to these figures – and to rock art in general, which has been a central motif in almost all primitive religions or mythologies since the birth of agricultural societies. The recurrence of abstract motifs within the rock art of this area, and its durability over time, could be an indication of common cultural patterns among the different populations that inhabited the province. But these same signs are also repeated in different parts of the world – could it therefore suggest universal aspects of our species?

The interpretation of these symbols has been – and continues to be – subject to intangible or subjective issues; therefore, it is not exempt from possible projections of our own culture. We think that we are able to approach, in a scientific way, the ritual and symbolic aspects of those who elaborated these paintings. In this book, the author proposes an alternative according to the theoretical framework of disciplines such as ethnography, anthropology, landscape archaeology, archaeoastronomy and semiotics.

La finalidad de este estudio es el análisis de la figura soliforme en el arte rupestre esquemático. Presentamos una investigación global atendiendo a todos los factores susceptibles de estudio (tecnológicos, tipológicos, estilísticos, semióticos, astronómicos, antropológicos y paisajísticos) de esta figura y de su relación con el conjunto del arte rupestre esquemático y con las sociedades autoras del mismo. El ámbito geográfico de nuestro estudio será el entorno de la Laguna de la Janda y el Campo de Gibraltar (Cádiz).

Uno de los argumentos que esgrimimos para la realización de esta investigación es la escasa producción de estudios realizados en el territorio gaditano en relación a esta figura- y al arte rupestre en general- que ha sido motivo central en casi todas las religiones o mitologías primitivas desde el nacimiento de las sociedades agropecuarias. La recurrencia de los motivos abstractos dentro del arte rupestre de la zona que nos ocupa, y su perduración en el tiempo, podría ser indicio de patrones culturales comunes entre las diferentes poblaciones que habitaron nuestra provincia. Pero estos mismos signos también se repiten en diferentes partes del mundo. ¿Podríamos estar hablando de aspectos universales de nuestra especie? Somos conscientes que la interpretación de este símbolo ha estado y está sujeta a cuestiones subjetivas o intangibles, por consiguiente, no exenta de posibles proyecciones de nuestra propia cultura. Creemos que estamos en condiciones de aproximarnos de una manera científica a los aspectos rituales y simbólicos de aquellos que elaboraron estas pinturas, proponiendo una alternativa desde los marcos teóricos de disciplinas como la Etnografía, la Antropología, la Arqueología del Paisaje, la Arqueoastronomía y la Semiótica.

About the Author
MERCEDES VERSACI received her Ph.D. from the University of Cádiz in 2018 and she is an active member of the research group HUM 812: Studies in Prehistory, Archeology, Ethnoarchaeology, Anthropology and Cultural Landscape (PAEAPC) at the same institution. Her studies on the rock art of the Province of Cádiz go back to the year 2007, and she has published (in specialist magazines) several researches concerning paintings and funeral customs in recent prehistory. She has participated in vari
NEW: ‘Isaac went out to the field’: Studies in Archaeology and Ancient Cultures in Honor of Isaac Gilead edited by Haim Goldfus, Mayer I. Gruber, Shamir Yona and Peter Fabian. Paperback; 205x290mm; xvi+402 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 6 colour plates. English text with Hebrew abstracts. 546 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918293. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918309. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

‘Isaac went out to the field (Genesis 24:63)’ is a collection of 28 articles by 47 authors from research institutions in Israel and around the world honoring Professor Isaac Gilead on the occasion of his 71st birthday. The authors include the honoree’s mentors, colleagues, and students. Most of the articles deal with archaeological subjects, especially prehistoric and proto-historic archaeology, which are the focus of the honoree’s teaching and research. Reflecting the broad horizons of Gilead’s interests, the volume also includes studies in other subjects including the Bible and the ancient Near East, Second Temple literature, the history of biblical exegesis, and the influence of the Bible on contemporary Hebrew Literature.

About the editors HAIM GOLDFUS teaches classical archaeology in the Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. His main fields of interest and research are related to early Roman and Late Antique/ early Byzantine archaeology.

MAYER I. GRUBER is Professor Emeritus and Past Chair of the Department of Bible Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beer Sheva. His publications include Aspects of Nonverbal Communication in the Ancient Near East (2 vols.; Rome: Biblical Institute Press, 1980); The Motherhood of God and Other Studies (Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1992); Women in the Biblical World: A Study Guide (American Theological Library Association, Bibliography Series, no. 38; Lanham, MD, and London: Scarecrow Press, 1995); Rashi’s Commentary on Psalms (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2004); Women in Ancient Israel and Studies in Early Jewish Civilization, translated from English into Chinese by Shuqing Zhang (Beijing: China Social Sciences Press, 2009); The Women of Israel by Grace Aguilar with a New Introduction and Commentary (Piscataway, NJ: Gorgias Press 2011, 2013); and Hosea: A Textual Commentary (London: Bloomsbury T & T Clark, 2017).

SHAMIR YONA is Associate Professor in the Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. He served for two terms as Chair of that department and two terms as Head of the Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Studies Division in that department. He is Co-chair with Elad Filler of the Judaica Section for Society of Biblical Literature International Meetings. He is a member of the board of directors of the New Israel Society for Biblical Research. Yona’s publications focus on the poetics of Ancient Near Eastern literature; the wisdom literature of the Bible, the ancient Near East, and rabbinic literature; biblical prophecy and narrative; Ugaritic language and literature; and Semitic lexicography.

PETER FABIAN completed his studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in 2005 with a PhD dissertation concerning the Roman army camp in Oboda-Avedat. After working for many years in the Israel Antiquities Authority as a senior archaeologist and an advisor, he was given a tenure track position as a classical archaeologist in the Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, where he is currently a Senior Lecturer. Dr. Fabian combines his interests and expert knowledge and long track-record of fieldwork in Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and Early Islamic archaeology, together with excavations and studies concerning the protohistory of the Southern Levant, particularly the Chalcolithic period of the Negev and the Shephela lowlands of Israel.
NEW: Over the Mountains and Far Away: Studies in Near Eastern history and archaeology presented to Mirjo Salvini on the occasion of his 80th birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan, Roberto Dan and Yervand H. Grekyan. Paperback; 205x290mm; xviii+572 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (135 plates in colour). 545 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919436. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919443. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The publication of Over the Mountains and Far Away: Studies in Near Eastern history and archaeology presented to Mirjo Salvini on the occasion of his 80th birthday was initiated by the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, the International Association of Mediterranean and Oriental Studies (Rome, Italy) and the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies (Yerevan, Armenia) as a tribute to the career of Professor Mirjo Salvini on the occasion his 80th birthday. It is composed of 62 papers written by his colleagues and students from Italy, Germany, France, Spain, Poland, the Netherlands, Denmark, Austria, Great Britain, Russian Federation, Israel, Turkey, Islamic Republic of Iran, Georgia, United States and Armenia. The contributions presented here cover numerous topics, a wide geographical area and a long chronological period. However, most of the contributions deal with research in the fields of Urartian and Hittite Studies, the topics that attracted Prof. Salvini during his long and fruitful career most.

About the editors
PAVEL AVETISYAN is a leading archaeologist from Republic of Armenia. Area of his research is Old World archaeology, particularly Neolithic to Iron Age cultures of Armenia and Transcaucasia, problems of their periodisation and chronology. P. Avetisyan led various excavation projects in Armenia (Talin, Agarak, Karashamb, Godedzor, Masis Blur, and others). He received his PhD in 2003 (‘Periodisation and Chronology of the Middle Bronze Age of Armenia’) and Dr Habil. in 2014 (‘Armenian Highland during the 24-9th Centuries BC: The Dynamics of Socio-Cultural Transformations, according to Archaeological Data’). Prof. Avetisyan is currently Director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences, Republic of Armenia and Professor at the Yerevan State University. Publications include three monographs and more than 100 articles devoted to the mentioned problems.

ROBERTO DAN is a member of ISMEO – International Association of Mediterranean and Oriental Studies. He is an archaeologist specialised in architecture, history and landscape archaeology of the Near East, focused on the 1st millennium BC (Urartu, Achaemenid Empire). He obtained his PhD from the ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome, with a thesis on the archaeological landscape of Urartu. Roberto has conducted fieldwork in Armenia, Georgia, Turkey and Iran. He is director of the ISMEO – Archaeological Mission to South Caucasus (AMSC), a project co-financed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of the Italian Republic, which involves archaeological activities in Armenia (Kotayk Survey Project since 2013; Vayots Dzor Project since 2015) and Georgia (Samtskhe-Javakheti Project since 2017), with excavations in the Urartian sites of Solak 1 and Yelpin 1. In 2015, he published a book devoted to the analysis of historical and architectural relations between Urartu and the Achaemenid Empire.

YERVAND GREKYAN is a leading researcher at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Associate Professor at the Armenian State Pedagogical University. He received his PhD in 2002 (‘History of the Mannean Kingdom’) and defended his habilitation thesis on the structure of the Urartian Kingdom at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia in 2016 (‘Biainili-Urartu. State and Society’).Y. Grekyan is the author of more than 70 articles and book chapters devoted to the ancient history and culture of the Near East and especially of the Armenian Highland in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages. He is a founding member of the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies and vice-editor of Aramazd: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies.
NEW: Early Neolithic, Iron Age and Roman settlement at Monksmoor Farm, Daventry, Northamptonshire by Tracy Preece. Paperback; viii+82 pages; 53 figures, 27 tables (36 plates presented in full colour). 544 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692105. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692112. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Includes contributions from Rob Atkins, Andy Chapman, Mary Ellen Crothers, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Rob Perrin and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray; illustrations by Olly Dindol and Rob Reed.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) has undertaken archaeological work at Monksmoor Farm on the north-eastern edge of Daventry in six different areas. The earliest archaeological features lay in Area 6 at the southern end of the development area, where two pits were radiocarbon dated to the early Neolithic. They contained a moderate assemblage of worked flints along with sherds of early Neolithic pottery. In the middle Iron Age a settlement was established in the same location comprising a roundhouse and several enclosures.

Two other contemporary settlements are thought to have originated in the late Iron Age/ early 1st century BC and were identified in Areas 1 and 2 between c0.2km and 0.5km apart and 500m to the north of Area 6. Area 1 contained evidence for a cluster of eight roundhouses with associated enclosures clearly showing sequential activity, while in Area 2, a large ditched enclosure defined as a Wootton Hill type, within which another roundhouse was present. It is possible that the Wootton Hill type enclosure in particular may have a slighter earlier origin than the limited pottery assemblage suggests. Sparse early Roman features were also found in Areas 3, 4 and 5.

This settlement continued in use through the later 1st to 2nd century AD. During the early Roman period the settlement in Area 6 was greatly expanded with large rectilinear ditched enclosures along with smaller enclosures and paddocks being established on either side of a routeway indicating movement of livestock was important.
NEW: The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Moon: Coffin Texts Spells 154–160 by Gyula Priskin. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+254 pages; 4 tables, 1 figure. 542 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 22. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691986. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691993. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Moon proposes that Coffin Texts spells 154–160, recorded at around the beginning of the 2nd millennium BCE, form the oldest composition about the moon in ancient Egypt and, for that matter, in the entire world. The detailed analysis of these spells, based on a new translation, reveals that they provide a chronologically ordered account of the phenomena of a lunar month. It is argued that through a wide variety of mythological allusions, the separate texts – following an introduction which explains the origins of the month (spell 154) – describe the successive stages of the monthly cycle: the period of invisibility (spell 155), waxing (spell 156), events around the full moon (spell 157), waning (spell 158), the arrival of the last crescent at the eastern horizon (spell 159), and again the conjunction of the sun and the moon when a solar eclipse occurs (spell 160). After highlighting the possible lunar connotations of each spell, further chapters in the book investigate the origins of the composition, its different manuscripts preserved on coffins coming from Hermopolis and Asyut, and the survival of the spells in the later mortuary collection known as the Book of Going Forth by Day.

About the Author
GYULA PRISKIN has an MA in English language and literature from the University of Szeged, and started working as a language teacher in the early 1990s. For fifteen years he taught English at the business college in his hometown, Békéscsaba, Hungary. In the 1990s he also became interested in ancient Egypt and has been publishing his research in various journals since 1998. Lately his main focus of enquiry has been on astral myths, especially the role and significance of the moon in ancient Egypt. In 2012 he received an MA in Egyptology from Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, and now holds a PhD in the discipline from the same institution. Since 2016 he has been working as a teaching assistant at the Department of Ancient History, University of Szeged.
NEW: Bridging Science and Heritage in the Balkans Studies in Archaeometry and Cultural Heritage Restoration and Conservation edited by Nona Palincaş and Corneliu C. Ponta. Paperback; vi+156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 541 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691962. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691979. Book contents pageDownload

In a period when, particularly in the West, the study of archaeological remains is enriched through new methods derived from the natural sciences and when there is general agreement on the need for more investment in the study, restoration and conservation of the tangible cultural heritage, this book presents contributions to these fields from South-Eastern Europe. This region is characterised by a contrast between the rather limited development of the above scientific methods and the particularly rich and diverse material remains of its past societies, as well as by an obvious need to bring closer together traditionally-trained archaeologists with specialists in natural sciences interested in the research and conservation of ancient material remains. The title ‘Bridging Science and Heritage in the Balkans’ intends to show that the volume is part of this effort.

The departing point of this volume is the 5th Balkan Symposium of Archaeometry (25–29 September 2016, Sinaia, Romania), where most of the papers published here were presented in preliminary form. The contributors are specialists from South-Eastern Europe as well as from other European countries working there. Some chapters focus on methods (in the research of glass, restoration of stone monuments affected by contemporary graffiti, conservation by irradiation of organic materials such as wood and human and animal body remains); most chapters present case studies (analyses of ceramics, metals, soils, wood anatomy, isotope-based reconstruction of human diet, ancient DNA, radiocarbon dating, technology assisted field survey, as well as restoration of paper and pigments); sometimes several methods are combined. The volume covers nearly all aspects of heritage sciences employed in this part of Europe.

About the Editors
NONA PALINCAŞ is senior researcher with the Vasile Pârvan Institute of Archaeology of the Romanian Academy in Bucharest. Her research interests include both social archaeology (particularly gender, body practices, power, knowledge, agency and creativity in the south-east European Bronze and Iron Ages and in contemporary archaeology) and archaeometry (primarily radiocarbon dating and analysis of archaeological ceramics). She has conducted excavations in the pre- and protohistoric settlement at Popeşti (Romania), the Late Iron Age habitation of which was identified with Argedaon/Argedava − the residence of the father of the Dacian king Burebista. In various publications she has pleaded for stronger development of archaeological theory and of archaeometry in Romania and in South-Eastern Europe in general.

CORNELIU C. PONTA, PhD, chemical engineer, has worked for more than 40 years at the Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) in Măgurele, Romania. He established, developed and led the IRASM Radiation Processing Centre – a department orientated to research and development, treatments, consulting, promotion and implementation of applications of gamma irradiation. Among these the disinfection of cultural heritage by gamma irradiation is now an accepted conservation alternative in Romania. Recently he contributed to the book Uses of Ionizing Radiation for Tangible Cultural Heritage Conservation (IAEA, Radiation Technology Series No. 6, 2017).
NEW: Europa Postmediaevalis 2018 Post-medieval pottery between (its) borders edited by Gabriela Blažková and Kristýna Matějková. Paperback; 210x297mm; viii+298 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 540 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691887. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691894. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This anthology is a collection of works from the Europa Postmediaevalis conference held in Prague in the spring of 2018. As the name of the conference suggests, the subject of interest is the Early Modern period (15th to 18th century) and the manner in which this relatively young discipline within the field of archaeology is approached in Europe.

The first year of the conference set the goal of searching for topics in post-medieval archaeology that reflect their current situation while simultaneously addressing a broader group of scholars. Therefore, it is hardly surprising that the central theme pursued by generations across Europe proved to be Early Modern ceramics, the large assemblages of which are, for many of us, the bread and butter of our daily lives – a delight and often a headache resulting from their further processing. Since this issue is the one perceived most acutely in the Czech Republic, the organisers decided to share their current quandaries in this field with both domestic and foreign colleagues.

The long-term objective of the conference is to create a professional platform with a uniform communication language (English) and a biennial periodicity allowing scholars to meet regularly to exchange experience gained in their study and work in post-medieval archaeology. The articles published in this anthology reflect the current state of research of Early Modern pottery in individual European countries (the Czech Republic, Croatia, Italy, Hungary, Germany, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Switzerland), including both successes and possible shortcomings. The individual studies should serve as impulses for further study, ideas for thought and discussion and, last but not least, as study material for those who come into contact with Early Modern material culture as part of their work.

About the Editors
GABRIELA BLAŽKOVÁ studied archaeology and history at the Faculty of Arts of Charles University in Prague, where she earned her PhD in 2011. Today she works as an archaeologist at the Institute of Archaeology of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague. She is an expert in Late Medieval and Early Modern Archaeology (the second half of the 15th century–first half of 17th century in particular) with an emphasis on material culture. She has also been involved in rescue archaeological research in Prague – Hradčany.

KRISTÝNA MATĚJKOVÁ studied archaeology at Masaryk University in Brno and entered the doctoral programme at Charles University in Prague. Her main interest is the issue of processing medieval and Early Modern assemblages from Czech towns. She is currently writing her PhD dissertation on the issue of assemblages from Prague cesspits dating to the end of the 17th century and the 18th century. Her research interest is currently focussed on the popularisation of archaeology and interactive childhood education as part of the HistoryPark project.
NEW: Wari Women from Huarmey Bioarchaeological Interpretation of Human Remains from the Wari Elite Mausoleum at Castillo de Huarmey, Peru by Wiesław Więckowski. Paperback; 175x245; vi+152 pages; 56 figures (37 plates in colour). 535 2019 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 11. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691849. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691856. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations at the Castillo de Huarmey archaeological site brought to light the first intact burial of female high-elite members of the Wari culture. It was found beneath a large adobe mausoleum, a landmark and focal point of the lower Huarmey Valley. Abundant grave goods, among which were precious metal artefacts, luxurious pottery, beautifully decorated bone and wooden objects, as well as spinning and weaving utensils, leave no doubt about the social status of individuals buried within the main chamber. The very unique character of the find was additionally emphasized by the fact that all of the buried individuals were women, accompanied by two grave guardians, and the remains of ancestors. This book presents the results of bioarchaeological analyses performed to date, and focuses on reconstructing the funeral rite and social status of the deceased. About the Author
WIESŁAW WIĘCKOWSKI (born 1974) is a graduate of the Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw. He has also studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem where he specialized in bioarchaeology and funeral archaeology. He has worked on many sites, including Ashkelon, Gesher, Tel Zahara in Israel, Achaia Klaus in Greece, Churajon, and Maucallacta in Peru, both as archaeologist and bioarchaeologist. Since 2010, he has been a member of the Polish-Peruvian research team, led by Miłosz Giersz, that in 2013 discovered the first completely preserved burial of the highest elites of the Wari culture at the site Castillo de Huarmey. He is currently professor at the Department of Bioarchaeology of the University of Warsaw.
NEW: The Poole Iron Age Logboat edited by Jessica Berry, David Parham and Catrina Appleby. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+122 pages; 82 Figures, 10 tables (48 colour pages). 531 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691443. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691450. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Poole Iron Age logboat, one of the largest surviving prehistoric watercraft in Britain, is today imposingly displayed in the entrance to Poole Museum in Dorset. However, the vessel faced a difficult journey from its first discovery to the amazing artefact we can now see.

Recovered from Poole Harbour in 1964, it is impossible to overestimate the international significance of this vessel. But until now it had never been fully recorded and apart from its impressive size, very little was known about it. Its dimensions made it inherently unstable and suggest it was designed for use solely in Poole Harbour.

This book is the culmination of significant multi-disciplinary work carried out by a variety of specialists, from conservators to woodworking and boatbuilding experts, exploring not only the craft’s history but also its functionality – or lack of – as a vessel. Digital recording, using the latest technology, has made it possible to test its capabilities. For the first time, prehistorians, nautical archaeologists and lay people alike can understand the story of one of Britain’s oldest boats – the archaeological and historical background, the environmental context, the timber and ship science, and the challenges of conserving such an important vessel.

About the Editors
JESSICA BERRY is an award-winning maritime archaeologist, a diver, and founder and CEO of MAST. She is a maritime archaeologist MA (Hons) MA ACIfA and a former journalist with UK broadsheets. Since completing her Masters at Flinders University in Australia, she has worked on a number of major maritime archaeological projects both in the UK and internationally whilst growing and developing MAST into an internationally respected organisation that is changing the ways in which underwater cultural heritage is perceived and how it can be better protected.

DAVID PARHAM is a Professor in Maritime Archaeology at Bournemouth University. He is an experienced archaeologist and diver / diving supervisor who has directed maritime archaeological projects that range in date from the Bronze Age to the Second World War and in scope from strategic studies to extensive field investigations. He has worked extensively throughout the British Isles as well as the Baltic, Mediterranean, Indian Ocean, South China Sea and Arabian Sea. His research interests focus on the archaeology of seafaring and ship construction of all periods but can extend into underwater cultural heritage management on occasions.

CATRINA APPLEBY has been working in archaeology for 40 years. She studied at Durham and Birmingham universities and has wide experience in many types of archaeology, from excavation and field survey to HERs and planning. She has worked for a variety of organisations in England and Scotland. She is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists. For the past 20 years her work has focused on editing archaeological and heritage publications, including nine years as the Publications Manager for the Council for British Archaeology, during which time CBA titles won several awards. She now works as a freelance editor for a number of publishers.
NEW: Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 2 Italy: Southern Tyrrhenian. Neolithic – Bronze Age by Sara T. Levi, Valentina Cannavò and Daniele Brunelli with contributions by Andrea Di Renzoni. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+168 pages; 40 figures, 17 tables and 16-page colour plate section containing 163 illustrations. 525 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691177. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691184. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 2. Italy: Southern Tyrrhenian. Neolithic – Bronze Age presents and interprets the petrographic composition of pre-protohistoric pottery (6th-1st millennia BCE) found in southwestern part of Italy. This is the second in a Atlas series organised according to geographical areas, chronology and types of wares. In this book 890 samples from 29 sites are discussed, encompassing results of more than 50 years of interdisciplinary archaeological, technological and archaeometric research by the authors’ team. Ninety petrographic fabrics (the potters’ ‘recipes’) are defined and presented based on their lithological character – a tool that can be used to compare different components of the ceramic pastes and to check possible provenance of non-local pots.

The volume is organized in chapters focused on methodology, fabric description and distribution, followed by the archaeological implications and the database, with contribution by Andrea Di Renzoni (CNR-ISMA, Roma). Illustrations and descriptions of the fabrics and a list of samples provide a rigorous and transparent presentation of the data. The archaeological implications are discussed through cross-correlatios between origin and technology, variability, standardisation, chronology, function, social organization, circulation, style, typology and cultural identity. We hope that this work will be considered an another stepping-stone in demonstrating that technological variability is as important as stylistic distinctions.

About the Authors
SARA T. LEVI’s research focuses on the ancient pottery through an integrated approach, and on the archaeology of central Mediterranean. She obtained a PhD in archaeology at the Sapienza University in Rome (1996). Her findings have been published in scientific journals and books, including a volume on the Italo-Mycenaean pottery (2014). Since 2015 she has been teaching at Hunter College in New York, after teaching for eight years at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Since 2009 she leads the interdisciplinary archaeological investigations at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands) and at Cannatello (Agrigento). Both projects hold international field school for students in a multidisciplinary environment.

VALENTINA CANNAVÓ’s research focuses on the archaeometric investigation of ancient pottery. She is a research fellow at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia where she obtained a PhD in archaeological science (2010). Valentina teaches pottery technology (Ferrara University) to graduate students. She is in charge of the database of prehistoric pottery is director of the field laboratory at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands).

DANIELE BRUNELLI’s research focuses on petrography, geochemistry and tectonics of oceanic ridges. He obtained his PhD at the University of Bologna (2002). Since 2007 he has been teaching at the University of Modena, is associated researcher at CNR-ISMAR, invited professor at the University of Brest and at the Institute de Physique du Globe de Paris. He supports the development of petrographic and geochemical approach of the archaeo-team by bringing expertise of the geological exploration of the volcanic terrains and the availability of cutting edge analytical approaches.
NEW: Tentsmuir: Ten Thousand Years of Environmental History by Robert M. M. Crawford. Paperback; 254x203mm; vi+190 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 519 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691245. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691252. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Tentsmuir has been a scene of human activity for over 10,000 years. It witnessed one of the earliest known occurrences in Scotland of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and has supported human activities throughout the Neolithic and Iron Age. In medieval times it was a home for the Norman nobility, and then a royal hunting forest with highly-valued fishing rights for Scottish Kings.

Tentsmuir is prone to flooding in winter due to the front line of dunes blocking drainage to the sea. It provides a natural refuge for a wide range of plants, as well as resident and migrating birds, and other animals, including outstanding populations of butterflies and moths. Consequently, this led to the creation in 1954 of a National Nature Reserve at the north-eastern end of the Tentsmuir Peninsula. Initially, an active period of coastal accretion more than trebled the size of the reserve. Now, however, Tentsmuir is eroding in places. The probability of rising sea levels and increasing exposure to storms may cause a level of destruction such that the physical existence and biological future of Tentsmuir cannot be guaranteed.

This book is an attempt to record how even within a limited geographical area, such as this peninsula on the east coast of Scotland, plant and animal communities are constantly reacting to environmental change. Frequently, it is difficult to decide whether or not these changes should be resisted, encouraged, or ignored. Examples are provided of instances where human intervention to counteract change has resulted in negative as well as positive consequences for biodiversity.

About the Author
ROBERT M. M. CRAWFORD is a graduate of the Universities of Glasgow and Liège. Postdoctoral years were spent at the Bakh Institute of Biochemistry in Moscow and at the biochemistry and botany departments of the Universities of Freiburg, Munich, and Oxford. From 1962 – 1999 he taught and researched at the University of St Andrews, pursuing in particular the study of the physiological ecology of plants in a wide range of habitats in Scotland, Scandinavia, North and South America, and the Arctic. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Linnean Society of London, and an associate member of the Belgian Royal Academy of Sciences.
NEW: NVMINA MAGNA: Roma e il culto dei Grandi Dei di Samotracia by Emiliano Cruccas. Paperback; 175x245mm; x+142 pages; 1 table, 73 figures (16 plates in colour). Italian text throughout. 507 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690910. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690927. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The cult of the Great Gods of Samothrace, which became popular starting as early as the 7th century BC in the eastern Mediterranean, is characterised by regional differences concerning cultural manifestations and relationships with local deities. Confused and identified with the so-called Cabiri, these deities had their main sanctuaries on the islands of Samothrace and Lemnos and in Thebes, in Boeotia. The connection between these deities and others like Dioscuri, Penates and Lares and their protective function seem to be a key to understanding the complex syncretism that characterises the cult of the Great Gods from the period of Roman conquests in the Eastern world. The literary sources seem to highlight, in fact, in the period in which the interests in the Eastern world are crucial to the foreign policy of Rome, an evident attempt to identify the Kabiroi of Samothrace with typically Roman gods like Lares and Penates. The aim of this book is to underline the main aspects of the cult in light of the influences of Roman cultural and mythological substratum.

Il culto dei Grandi Dei di Samotracia, diffuso nel Mediterraneo orientale a partire almeno dal VII secolo a.C., è caratterizzato da differenze nei diversi bacini geografici, sia per ciò che concerne le manifestazioni culturali, sia per quanto riguarda i rapporti con le divinità locali. Confusi ed identificati con i cosiddetti Cabiri, queste divinità avevano i loro principali santuari sulle isole di Samotracia e Lemno e a Tebe di Beozia. La loro connessione con i Dioscuri, i Penati e i Lari e la loro funzione protettiva sembrano essere la chiave di lettura per comprendere il complesso sincretismo che caratterizza il culto dei Grandi Dei a partire dalla conquista romana del Mediterraneo occidentale. Le fonti letterarie sembrano evidenziare, infatti, nel periodo nel quale le azioni di politica estera di Roma si concentrano in Oriente, una forte volontà di identificare gli dei di Samotracia con divinità tipicamente romane come Lari e Penati. Lo scopo di questo libro è quello di mettere in evidenza i principali aspetti del culto attraverso l’analisi delle influenze del sostrato culturale e mitologico di Roma.

About the Author
EMILIANO CRUCCAS completed his degree (2002) and his specialisation in Classical Archaeology (2006) at the University of Cagliari and received his PhD (2011) from the University of Tübingen. He worked on a two-year contract at the Young Researchers project at the University of Cagliari and holds a three-year postdoctoral grant. He is now (2013-present day) field director for the ISTHMOS excavation project in the Punic-roman city of Nora (south Sardinia).

Emiliano Cruccas ha conseguito presso l’Università di Cagliari la laurea (2002) e la specializzazione in Archeologia Classica (2006). È Dottore di ricerca con una tesi sul culto dei Cabiri e dei Grandi Dei discussa all’Università di Tübingen (2011). Ha svolto ricerca presso l’Università di Cagliari con un contratto di due anni per Giovani Ricercatori e con un assegno di ricerca di tre anni. Attualmente dirige sul campo il progetto di scavo ISTHMOS nella città punico-romana di Nora (sud Sardegna).
NEW: Execution by Styrax in Ancient Thasos by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+42 pages; 33 figures, 5 graphs (27 plates presented in full colour). 86 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692129. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692136. Book contents pageDownload

Searching through interdisciplinary research to recover echoes of the human condition ingrained as they may be in the skeletal record of the ancients, there have been few cases in the forty year experience of the author which in defiance to the relentless passage of Chrόnos and even the chthonic potency of the waters of Léthe to dissolve all strings relating to Mnenosỳne could offer compelling evidentiary data, critical for generating meaningful interpretive answers as a nexus to life pathways and experiences in antiquity, reflective of dynamics and circumstances, that were not always possible to be recorded or spoken of by the attendants of Cléo. And yet in rare cases, millennia later, ostensibly through the works of Láchesis, a synergy between the fields of Archaeological Anthropology and Bioarchaeology may offer a unique portal whereby the dictum mortui vivos docent may be reiterated.

Sharing in the objectives of an ongoing archaeo-anthropological endeavor, aiming to better decipher and elucidate facets of the human condition while carrying out funerary archaeological research of Hellenistic to Roman periods family graves at the extensive ancient necropolis of Thasos, the most northern Aegean island, this essay addresses a case of unique forensic / bioarchaeological interest involving an older male individual, a member of one of the clusters of burials, who had been placed as a single interment in a most conspicuous limestone cyst grave of the Hellenistic period.

While odontological, cranio-infracranial skeleto-anatomic manifestations and palaeopathologies revealed a detailed rostrum on aspects of his developmental growth, of acquired and degenerative somatic changes, reflective of his life experiences which involved long term most active participations in physically demanding yet specialized activities, a staggering ‘through and through’ sternal trauma of astonishing preservation, provided for a distinct opportunity to conduct a unique cross-disciplinary investigation on the nature of the weapon reconstructed in bronze, the archaeometry on the trajectory and factors of speed and force at the deliverance of the strike, along with the diagnostic assessments of the thoracic tissues pierced consecutively and their moribund consequences.

A review of historical references on the implementation of capital punishment either through the decision of a dicastic or ephetic court, and/or execution carried out as a result of outlawry are evaluated in relevance to funerary practices as these pertained to the interment of the Thasian male within the context of the burial ground, offering in retrospect assessments on the probable cause of his violent death.

About the Author
ANAGNOSTIS P. AGELARAKIS is Professor of Anthropology at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.

In the earlier years of his career, he carried out field and/or lab archaeo-anthropological research projects focusing on the organizational abilities, capacities, and adaptations of the human condition during the Holocene in SE and SW Asia, the Middle East, the American Northeast, and the Caribbean.

The central area of his research remains however the Eastern Mediterranean with emphasis on the ancient world of the Greeks, at the cross roads and sea routes between Africa, Asia, and Europe. Under the domains of Anthropological Archaeology, Funerary Archaeology, Bio-Archaeology and Forensics he studies the biological profiles, the demographic dynamics, and palaeopathological records of human skeletal populations from prehistoric periods to the late medieval era. Based on the skeletal record, he i
NEW: RACTA 2018: Ricerche di Archeologia Cristiana, Tardantichità e Altomedioevo edited by Chiara Cecalupo, Giovanna Assunta Lanzetta and Priscilla Ralli. Paperback; 203x276; 248 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 20 plates in colour. Papers in Italian, English, French and German. Introduction and abstracts in English. (Print RRP £45.00). 84 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691740. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691757. Book contents pageDownload

RACTA (Ricerche di Archeologia Cristiana, Tardantichità e Altomedioevo) was the first international conference for PhD students of Christian Archaeology. It took place in Rome in February 2018, hosted by Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana and gathered more than 50 multidisciplinary talks and posters from PhD students from Europe, America and Russia. The engagement shown at the well-attended event, and the interest of several institutions, proved that Christian archaeology continues to be important to new generations of archaeologists, art historians, and researchers of the ancient world.

About the Editors
CHIARA CECALUPO has a PhD in History of Christian Archaeology from the Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana (‘La Roma Sotterranea di Antonio Bosio e i primi collezionisti di antichità cristiane’), and is a researcher and teaching assistant at the University of Pisa. Her work concerns the history of archaeology and collections.

GIOVANNA ASSUNTA LANZETTA is a PhD student at The Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana (‘La basilica di Santa Eufemia a Grado’). Her research focusses on early Christian architecture with the support of new technologies (such as 3D reconstructions) and on Christian and medieval topography.

PRISCILLA RALLI is a PhD student at the Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana (thesis “L’architettura paleocristiana del Peloponneso”) in agreement with the Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene (SAIA-IASA) and with a scholarship (related to the study of Argos and the Argolid during the Late Antiquity) from the Ecole Française d’Athènes (EFA).
NEW: The Geography of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Second International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 22nd-23rd March, 2018 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789691863. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 plates in colour). (Print RRP £38.00). 533 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691863. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691870. Book contents pageDownload

Gandhāran art is usually regarded as a single phenomenon – a unified regional artistic tradition or ‘school’. Indeed it has distinctive visual characteristics, materials, and functions, and is characterized by its extensive borrowings from the Graeco-Roman world. Yet this tradition is also highly varied. Even the superficial homogeneity of Gandhāran sculpture, which constitutes the bulk of documented artistic material from this region in the early centuries AD, belies a considerable range of styles, technical approaches, iconographic choices, and levels of artistic skill.

The geographical variations in Gandhāran art have received less attention than they deserve. Many surviving Gandhāran artefacts are unprovenanced and the difficulty of tracing substantial assemblages of sculpture to particular sites has obscured the fine-grained picture of its artistic geography. Well documented modern excavations at particular sites and areas, such as the projects of the Italian Archaeological Mission in the Swat Valley, have demonstrated the value of looking at sculptures in context and considering distinctive aspects of their production, use, and reuse within a specific locality. However, insights of this kind have been harder to gain for other areas, including the Gandhāran heartland of the Peshawar basin. Even where large collections of artworks can be related to individual sites, the exercise of comparing material within and between these places is still at an early stage. The relationship between the Gandhāran artists or ‘workshops’, particular stone sources, and specific sites is still unclear.

Addressing these and other questions, this second volume of the Gandhāra Connections project at Oxford University’s Classical Art Research Centre presents the proceedings of a workshop held in March 2018. Its aim is to pick apart the regional geography of Gandhāran art, presenting new discoveries at particular sites, textual evidence, and the challenges and opportunities of exploring Gandhāra’s artistic geography.

About the Editors
WANNAPORN RIENJANG is Project Assistant of the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. She completed her doctoral degree in Archaeology at the University of Cambridge on Buddhist relic cult in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Before starting her PhD, she worked as a research assistant for the Masson Project at the Department of Coins and Medals, the British Museum. Her research interests include the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Buddhist studies, and working technologies of stone containers and beads.

PETER STEWART is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran art and Roman sculpture.
NEW: Early Farming in Dalmatia Pokrovnik and Danilo Bitinj: two Neolithic villages in south-east Europe by Andrew Moore and Marko Menđušić. Paperback; 175x245mm; ix+110 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 532 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691580. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691597. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Lawrence Brown, Sue Colledge, Robert Giegengack, Thomas Higham, Vladimir Hršak, Anthony Legge†, Drago Marguš, Sarah McClure, Carol Palmer, Emil Podrug, Kelly Reed, Jennifer Smith, and Joško Zaninović.

The origins and spread of farming are vital subjects of research, notably because agriculture makes possible our modern world. The Early Farming in Dalmatia Project is investigating the expansion of farming from its centre of origin in western Asia through the Mediterranean into southern Europe. This multidisciplinary ecological project combines comprehensive recovery of archaeological materials through excavation with landscape studies. It addresses several key questions, including when and how farming reached Dalmatia, what was the nature of this new economy, and what was its impact on the local environment. Excavations at Danilo Bitinj and Pokrovnik have demonstrated that their inhabitants were full-time farmers. The two sites were among the largest known Neolithic villages in the eastern Adriatic. A comprehensive program of AMS dating indicates that together they were occupied from c. 8,000 to 6,800 cal BP. Our research has begun to illuminate the details of their farming system, as well as the changes that took place in their way of life through the Neolithic. Their economy was derived from western Asia and it is likely that their ancestors came from there also. It was these people who brought agriculture and village life to the Adriatic and to the rest of the central and western Mediterranean. Once in place, this farming economy persisted in much the same form from the Neolithic down to the present.

About the Authors

ANDREW MOORE’s archaeological interests span the Middle East, the Mediterranean, and Europe. His principal research focus is the beginning of agriculture and sedentary life in the Middle East and their spread to Africa and Eurasia. Moore has conducted field research in Syria, Iraq, Palestine, Croatia and other countries. In the 1970s Moore excavated the site of Abu Hureyra in the Euphrates Valley in Syria threatened by the construction of a new dam. The site was significant because it documented the transition from foraging to farming 13,000 years ago, much earlier than had been suspected. Moore is currently investigating the spread of farming around the Mediterranean and into southern Europe. He is co-director with Marko Menđušić of the Early Farming in Dalmatia Project. The project has demonstrated that agriculture reached the Adriatic region as a mature mixed farming system 8,000 years ago, brought in from farther east by migrating farmers. Moore’s M.A. and D.Phil. degrees are from the University of Oxford. He has taught archaeology at the University of Arizona and Yale University. Past President of the Archaeological Institute of America, Moore is currently Professor and Dean Emeritus at Rochester Institute of Technology.

MARKO MENĐUŠIĆ is a prehistoric archaeologist specializing in the Neolithic of Croatia. He was born in the village of Pokrovnik near Šibenik, in a farming family that traces its roots as far back as the seventeenth century. After graduating from the University of Zagreb he became Curator for Archaeology in the Šibenik City Museum and, in time, head of the Archaeological Department there. Menđušić has excavated numerous prehistoric and later sites in northern Dalmatia and on the offshore islands. He has also organized many exhibitions in museums in Croatia. In 2000 Menđušić invited Andrew Moore to join him in developing the Early Farming in Dalmatia Project, and has been co-director of the project since its inception. Menđušić became head of the Conservation Department of the Ministry of Culture in Šibenik in 2004. His responsibilities included preservation of historic buildings in the region at a time of rapidly increasing development. A long-standing membe
NEW: Tanbûr Long-Necked Lutes along the Silk Road and beyond by Hans de Zeeuw. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 528 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691696. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691702. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Tanbûr Long-Necked Lutes Along the Silk Road and beyond explores the origin, history, construction, and playing techniques of tanbûrs, a musical instrument widely used over vast territories and over many centuries. The diffusion of the tanbûr into the musical cultures along the Silk Road resulted in a variety of tanbûrs with two or more, occasionally doubled or tripled courses, a varying number and variously tuned frets, each having its own characteristic sound, playing technique, and repertory. Since the last century, tanbûrs spread beyond the Silk Road while new versions continue to appear due to changing musical and tonal demands made on them. Similar or identical instruments are also known by other names, such as saz or bağlama, dotâr or dutâr, setâr, dömbra, and dambura.

About the Author
HANS DE ZEEUW began to take bağlama lessons and became interested in its long and fascinating history while working at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and studying at the Open University. This led him to decide to break off his studies and focus, for many years, on research into the Turkish bağlama under the supervision of Dr L.J. Plenckers of the Department of Musicology of the University of Amsterdam and Dr Okan Murat Öztürk of the Devlet Konservatuvarı of the Başkent Üniversitesi in Ankara. In 2009 he published De Turkse Langhalsluit of bağlama (Turkish Long-Necked Lute or Bağlama) with the support of the Dutch Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds. His lecture to the Uluslararası Müzik Kongresi in Istanbul in 2006 was published in Türkiyede Müzik Kültürü in 2011. A short article about the Ottoman tanbûr, The Ottoman Tanbûr: Introducing the Long-Necked Lute of Ottoman Classical Music, followed in 2018 in Expedition, a magazine of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthroplogy. He is planning an in-depth study about the Ottoman tanbûr for the near future.
NEW: Dhofar Through the Ages An Ecological, Archaeological and Historical Landscape by Lynne S. Newton and Juris Zarins. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+132 pages; 61 figures, 47 tables (colour throughout). 521 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691603. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691610. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dhofar, the southern governorate of Oman, lies within a distinctive ecological zone due to the summer Southwest Monsoon. It is home to numerous indigenous succulent plants, the most famous of which is frankincense (Boswellia sacra). The region, tied in the past to both Oman and Yemen, has a long and distinguished archaeological past stretching back to the Lower Paleolithic ca. 1.5 my BP. Dhofar is also home to a distinctive people, the Modern South Arabian Languages speakers (MSAL) since at least the last 15,000 years. Ancient Zafar (Al-Habudi), now called Al-Baleed, and its successor Salalah was and is the province’s largest city. From the seventh century onwards until the arrival of the Portuguese in 1504 AD Al-Baleed dominated the central southern Arabian coastline politically and economically. Archaeological surveys and excavations in the governorate, beginning in 1954, have brought to light Dhofar’s ancient past.

About the Authors
LYNNE S. NEWTON received her doctorate from the University of Minnesota with research on the Iron Age and Islamic periods in the Mahra Governorate of Yemen. Since 2007, she has co-directed excavations at the Medieval port of Al-Baleed and the general archaeological survey of Dhofar. Between 2011 and 2014, she was Curator of Maritime History at the National Museum of Qatar. The author published numerous research articles on Dhofar and the Mahra Governate, including also her doctorate A Landscape of Pilgrimage and Trade in Wadi Masila Yemen (2009) and is co-author of the Atlas of Archaeological Survey in Governorate of Dhofar, Sultanate of Oman (2013).

JURIS ZARINS is retired Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at Missouri State University. He has excavated sites from the Lower Paleolithic to the Ottoman period in Mesopotamia (Turkey and Iraq) and more recently in the Arabian Peninsula, with a specific focus on the development of pastoral nomadism in Arabia and the origins of the Bedouin. Between 1992 and 2011, he worked in the Sultanate of Oman to uncover the Medieval port of al-Baleed and to conduct a general archaeological survey of Dhofar. The author has published many scientific research articles, including Dhofar: The Land of Incense (2001) and The Domestication of Equids in Ancient Mesopotamia (2014).
NEW: Glass and Glass Production in the Near East during the Iron Age Evidence from objects, texts and chemical analysis by Katharina Schmidt. Paperback; viii+316 pages; 85 figures, 28 tables, 68 plates (approx. 92 pages in colour). 520 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691542. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691559. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Glass and Glass Production in the Near East during the Iron Age: Evidence from objects, texts and chemical analysis examines the history of glass in Iron Age Mesopotamia and neighbouring regions (1000–539 BCE). This is the first monograph to cover this region and period comprehensively and in detail and thus fills a significant gap in glass research. It focusses on identification of the different types of glass objects and their respective manufacturing techniques from the the Iron Age period. Both glass as material and individual glass objects are investigated to answer questions such as as how raw glass (primary production) and glass objects (secondary production) were manufactured, how both these industries were organised, and how widespread glass objects were in Mesopotamian society in the Iron Age period. Such a comprehensive picture of glass and its production in the Iron Age can only be achieved by setting archaeological data in relation to cuneiform texts, archaeometric analyses and experimental-archaeological investigations. With regard to the different disciplines incorporated into this study, an attempt was made to view them together and to establish connections between these areas.

About the Author
KATHARINA SCHMIDT obtained MA in Near Eastern Archaeology at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität of Munich in 2012, with a dissertation on glazed Neo-Assyrian vessels from Upper Mesopotamia. In 2013 she started her PhD as a member of the Graduate School ‘Distant Worlds’ at the same university. As a visiting researcher, she studied at University College, London, and acquired additional knowledge in the use of chemical analyses – in particular with regard to glass. In 2016 she completed her PhD at Munich with a dissertation on glass and glassmaking in the Iron Age period. As an archaeologist she worked on excavations in Syria (Tell Halaf) and Turkey (Sirkeli Höyük, Dülük Baba Tepesi). Since 2016 she has been director of the German Protestant Institute of Archaeology in Amman, Jordan, where she carries out various research and excavation projects, above all the excavations at Tall Zirā´a.
NEW: Macedonia – Alexandria: Monumental Funerary Complexes of the Late Classical and Hellenistic Age by Dorota Gorzelany. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+236 pages; 76 Figures (44 full colour, 32 monochrome). 517 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691368. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691375. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The type of monumental tomb that developed in Macedonia in the late Classical period was undoubtedly the most impressive of all the Greek funerary complexes. It was a burial chamber with a vestibule, built of stone blocks, vaulted and furnished with an architectural facade, concealed under a large tumulus rising above the ground. The concept of the Macedonian sepulcher, which the Macedonians and Greeks settling in Alexandria ad Aegyptum, the city founded by Alexander the Great on the Egyptian coast, brought with them, influenced the structural form of the underground tombs that were developed in the new city. ‘Macedonia–Alexandria’ explores the scope of this influence, comparing in synthetic form the structural elements of the cist graves, chamber and rock-cut tombs of Macedonia with the Alexandrian hypogea, while taking into account the different geographical factors that conditioned them. This is followed by a presentation of the facade and interior decoration, and a discussion of the themes of wall painting inside the tombs and a characteristic of the surviving tomb furnishings.

The Macedonian tomb reflects in its form Greek eschatological beliefs ingrained in the mystery religions and the social ideology of the Macedonian kingdom. The assimilation of these beliefs is seen in the architectural arrangements, the vestibule and chamber plan, the facade (in Macedonia) or courtyard (in Alexandria), the structural and architectural interior decoration, and the furniture found in the chamber. These elements refer to palace architecture and determine the symbolic function of the tomb. The cult of the dead aspect is emphasized by wall painting iconography, the form of burial and the nature of the grave goods accompanying the deceased. In Alexandria, the role of rituals celebrated in the family tombs is attested by the declining size of burial chambers in favour of the vestibules and by the introduction of an open courtyard as well as the presence of altars. With regard to the ideology behind the Alexandrian complexes, the author explores the issue of the coexistence and the popularity of Egyptian beliefs adopted into Alexandrian sepulchral art, emphasizing the differences in the perception of the role of the tomb in the Macedonian and Egyptian consciousness.

About the Author
DOROTA GORZELANY studied Mediterranean Archaeology at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow, where she received her PhD in 2005. Since 1999 she has been a keeper of the ancient art collection in the Princes Czartoryski Museum (National Museum in Krakow) and a curator of the Gallery of Ancient Art. Since 2005 she has taught Ancient Art at the Pontifical University of John Paul II and since 2018 at the University of Silesia. She is a member of ICOM-Poland and Commission on the Archaeology of the Mediterranean Countries in the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences (PAU). Her research focusses on Greek and Roman iconography and the history of the museum collection.
NEW: Archaic and Classical Harbours of the Greek World The Aegean and Eastern Ionian contexts by Chiara Maria Mauro. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+116 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £30.00). 516 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691283. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691290. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaic and Classical Harbours of the Greek World explores the archaeology and history of ancient harbours and focuses on the Greek world during the Archaic and Classical eras. Its objective is to establish a consensus on three fundamental questions: What locations were the most propitious for the installation of harbours? What kinds of harbour-works were built and for what purpose? What harbour forms were documented? These subjects have been addressed by evaluating multiple forms of evidence (archaeological, geographical, nautical, textual, iconographic and geological) in the context of the Aegean and Eastern Ionian maritime settings.

About the Author
CHIARA MARIA MAURO gained an MA in Classical Archaeology at the University of Pisa (Italy) in 2012 with a dissertation on Phoenician seafaring in the Archaic period, and in 2014 she completed a master’s degree in Teaching History, Geography and History of Art at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Spain). In 2016 she obtained a PhD in Studies on the Ancient World from the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). In 2015 she was Visiting Research Student at the University Alma Mater (Bologna, Italy); in October 2017 she was awarded an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship to work on the project ‘Ancient Harbours in the Greek World: A study of Aegean and eastern Ionian Sea harbours from the dawn of the city-state to the Classical period’. She is currently Postdoctoral Fellow at the Haifa Center for Mediterranean History in the Department of Maritime Civilizations.
NEW: Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner and Rafał Czerner. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+312 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (128 colour plates). 513 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691481. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691498. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient town, discovered at the site of today’s Marina el-Alamein, located on the northern coast of Egypt, developed from the 2nd century BC to the 6th century AD, finding itself at the crossroads of several civilisations: Hellenic, later replaced by Roman, and eventually Christian – and always strongly influenced by Egyptian tradition. A variety of cultures have met and appeared, their prominence flourishing and faltering at different times, but they have always co-existed and influenced one another. The syncretism prevailing here is notable in art, architecture, religion and worship.

In 2015, it had been thirty years since the discovery of the remains of the ancient city, which, for many centuries, had been unknown to the world. They were found unexpectedly during the preparatory work for the construction of a modern tourist settlement on the Mediterranean coast, and the significance and extraordinary value of the find was immediately recognised. Now the ancient city, and the historic remains of its buildings, are gradually coming to light.

The Jubilee was twofold, since 2015 marked also the 20th anniversary of the setting up of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission, Marina el-Alamein. During this time, architectural and archaeological research has been carried out at the site, many discoveries have been made, numerous relics of historic building structures have been preserved, and conservation methods have been improved. In the jubilee year, we invited researchers who work on archaeological sites and towns with a similar history and position in the ancient world, art and culture, to take part in a scientific discussion and exchange of experience. The authors of the presented papers are representatives of different disciplines and research methodologies: archaeologists, architects, Egyptologists, specialists in religious studies, historians and conservators. The present volume contains an interdisciplinary review of both the newest and long-term studies and achievements made in various regions of the ancient world.

Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish- Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein presents papers ranging from ancient Mauritania, through Africa, Egypt, Cyprus, Palestine, Syria, as well as sites in Crimea and Georgia. The topography of cities, architecture of public buildings, as well as houses and their décor – architectural, sculptured and painted – are presented. Religious syncretism and the importance of ancient texts are discussed. Studies on pottery are also presented. The volume includes studies on the conservation of architecture, sculpture and painting. Several articles are devoted to the study of Marina el-Alamein; others talk about ancient Alexandria, Deir el- Bahari, Hermopolis Magna, Bakchias, Pelusium, Kom Wasit, Berenike, Ptolemais, Apollonia, Palmyra, Nea Paphos, as well as Chersonesus Taurica and Apsarus.

About the Editors
GRAŻYNA BĄKOWSKA-CZERNER (PhD) is Assistant Professor at the Centre of Comparative Studies of Civilisations of the Jagiellonian University. She specialises in archaeology of the Greco-Roman period in Egypt. Since 2001 she has been working as a permanent member of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission at the archaeological site Marina el-Alamein (Egypt), and since 2004 she has been a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission at Jebel Barkal (Sudan). Greco- Roman art, in particular iconography, are her main areas of interest. She is also involved in the study of ancient gems, as well as the iconography of decorated meroitic pottery.

RAFAŁ CZERNER (Professor) is the head of the Department of History of Architecture, Arts and Technology at the Faculty of Architecture, Wrocław University of Science and Technology (Poland) and the director of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission at the archaeological site Marina el-Alamein (Eg
NEW: Understanding Lithic Recycling at the Late Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave, Israel A functional and chemical investigation of small flakes by Flavia Venditti. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+188 pages; 11 tables, 113 figures (86 plates in colour). 509 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691016. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691023. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Flakes, and small flakes in particular, are usually seen as by-products or debris of the knapping process, rather than as desired end-products with a specific potential use. In recent years, this particular category of small tools has attracted increasing interest among researchers, especially when focusing on technological aspects in Lower Palaeolithic contexts, while the functional role of these tools is still poorly investigated.

Understanding Lithic Recycling at the Late Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave, Israel: A functional and chemical investigation of small flakes examines Late Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave, Israel, where a particular lithic trajectory directed towards the production of small flakes by means of recycling and exploiting old discarded flakes as cores has been recognised. The high density of this production throughout the stratigraphic sequence of the cave demonstrates that this was a conscious and planned technological choice aimed at providing small and sharp items to meet specific functional behaviours, and that this lithic behaviour persisted for some 200 kyr of human use of the cave. The exceptional conservation of use-wear signs and residues has made it possible to reconstruct the functional role of this specific production system, highlighting its specialised nature mostly related to the processing of the animal carcasses through accurate and careful actions and in a very specific way. The application of functional analysis based on the determination of wear on artefacts by means of optical light microscope, scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis (FTIR and EDX), provides a useful and effective approach for understanding the adaptive strategies of the Qesem Cave hominins while facing various situations and solving different needs.

About the Author
FLAVIA VENDITTI is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Tel Aviv, Israel. She specialises in the functional analysis of quartz and flint lithic tool production and has a particular interest in Palaeolithic assemblages. During her MA studies, she started working in the field of use-wear analysis under the supervision of Professor Cristina Lemorini at University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’. She focused her research on the use-wear study of a quartz assemblage form the Middle Palaeolithic site of Coudouolous in Quercy (France). Subsequently, she attended a two-years Masters class in Archaeological Heritage at University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ and completed her dissertation on the effects of the mechanical postdepositional alteration on quartz artifacts coming from Neolithic sites of the Sai Island (Sudan). Flavia completed her doctorate in 2017 with a research project on the functional analysis of the products of recycling from the Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave site in the Levant. She is a member of the Qesem Cave team project taking part in the annual archaeological excavations on the site.
NEW: De la provincia Celtiberia a la Qūrā de Santabariyya: Arqueología de la Antigüedad tardía en la provincia de Cuenca (siglos V-VIII d.C.) by Rafael Barroso Cabrera. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+560 pages; 174 figures, 5 tables, 2 maps, 80 plates (45 plates in colour). Spanish text with extended English summary. 498 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690644. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690651. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The central position of the province of Cuenca, Spain, was a decisive factor in its relationship with Toledo, the capital of the Visigothic kingdom. Also, its location meant that, from the middle of the 6th Century, it was directly affected by some of the most relevant historical episodes of those times: the foundation of the royal city of Reccopoli, the establishment of the Servitanus monastery, the transformation of Toledo as the metropolitan seat of the Carthaginian province and the military campaigns against the imperial forces. Parallel to this, archaeological excavations document a process of disrupting the old urban centres in favour of small populations within their municipal territory. This process was resolved with a shift of power centres towards other cities supported by the political power of Toledo: Toledo itself in the case of Segobriga, Reccopoli in the Arcavica’s case and Illunum to the detriment of Valeria. In this way, the ancient Roman cities were reduced to serve as a symbolic reference of the small villages that developed in the shadow of the old urban centres. This volume presents a historical and archaeological study of the province of Cuenca in Late Antiquity. The study concludes with an examination of the archaeological collection from the province, which has been divided into three large groups: monumental sculpture and epigraphic items, ceramic productions and metalwork arts. The first group is mainly constituted by the findings made in the excavations of Cabeza de Griego (Segobriga). Most of the pottery productions correspond to vessels placed as funerary deposits. Due to the absence of excavations, the ceramics for kitchen and storage use are hardly represented, whereas there is an overrepresentation of types destined for use as libations or offerings. Finally, most of the elements of industrial arts correspond to elements of the Latin-Mediterranean fashion or Byzantine style of the 7th Century. The almost total absence of materials corresponding to the Pontic-Danubian fashion also should be noted.

La posición central de la provincia de Cuenca ha sido el factor determinante en su relación con Toledo, la capital del reino visigodo. Esta situación fue la causa también de que, desde mediados del siglo VI, se viera directamente afectada por algunos de los episodios históricos más relevantes del momento: la fundación de la ciudad regia de Recópolis, el establecimiento del monasterio Servitano, la transformación de Toledo en sede metropolitana de la provincia cartaginesa y las campañas militares contra los ejércitos imperiales. De forma paralela, las excavaciones arqueológicas documentan un proceso de desestructuración de los antiguos centros urbanos a favor de pequeñas poblaciones de su territorio. Este proceso se resolvió con un cambio de centros de poder hacia otras ciudades apoyadas por el poder político de Toledo: Toledo mismo en el caso de Segóbriga, Recópolis en el caso de Arcávica e Illunum en detrimento de Valeria. De este modo, las ciudades romanas quedaron reducidas servir como referentes simbólicos de las pequeñas poblaciones que se desarrollaron a la sombra de los antiguos centros urbanos. El presente trabajo se completa con el estudio de la colección arqueológica procedente de la provincia, que se ha dividido en tres grandes grupos: escultura monumental y epigrafía, producciones cerámicas y artes industriales. El primer grupo está constituido principalmente por los hallazgos realizados en las excavaciones de Cabeza de Griego (Segóbriga). Por otro lado, la mayoría de las producciones de cerámica corresponden a vasijas colocadas como depósitos funerarios. Debido a la ausencia de excavaciones, la cerámica de cocina y de almacenamiento apenas aparece representada, mientras que hay una sobrerrepresentación de tipos destinados a libaciones u ofrendas. Finalmente, la mayoría de los materiales de las artes industriales corresponden a elementos de la moda latino-mediterránea o del estilo
NEW: Aesthetics, Applications, Artistry and Anarchy: Essays in Prehistoric and Contemporary Art A Festschrift in honour of John Kay Clegg, 11 January 1935 – 11 March 2015 edited by Jillian Huntley and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+170 pages; 100 figures, 5 tables (42 plates in colour). 496 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919986. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919993. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Scholar and artist John Clegg made a pioneering contribution to the study of rock art. He was the first in the Australian academy to teach rock art research as a dedicated subject (Sydney University 1965-2000), supervising the first graduate students with such specialty, subsequently supporting their careers. He is honoured here for much more than his novelty and the contributions in this monograph pay homage to the late John Kay Clegg’s diverse influence. Rock art researchers from around the globe traverses topics such as aesthetics, the application of statistical analyses, frontier conflict and layered symbolic meanings, the deliberate use of optical illusion, and the contemporary significance of ancient and street art. They cover rock art assemblages from Columbia, South Africa, Europe and across Clegg’s beloved Australia. They interrogate descriptive and analytic concepts such as repainting, memorialisation and graffiti, as well as questioning the ethical impactions of research practices touching rock art as a part of its study.

The tributes in this book are necessarily as individual as the man they honour, and John Clegg was certainly an individual. The longevity of ideas and perspectives Clegg brought to the pursuit of rock art research is demonstrated in this collection of works. Clegg’s continued relevance is testament to the value and magnitude of his contribution. He is a deserving subject for a Festschrift.

About the Editors
Dr JILLIAN HUNTLEY is a Research Fellow at the Place Evolution Rock Art Heritage Unit in the Centre for Social and Cultural Research at Griffith University, Australia. She specialises in the physiochemical characterization of rock art and other archaeological pigments and has been privileged in recent years to work on high-profile Australasian finds. A field archaeologist by trade, Jillian has 15 years experience in public archaeology and has worked with Aboriginal peoples across Australia since 2001 recording rock art as part of both research and commercial projects. Best known as an archaeological scientist, Jillian has published on diverse topics relating to rock art from the complex impacts of mining to pseudoarchaeology.

Dr GEORGE NASH is an Associate Professor at the Museum of Prehistoric Art, Quaternary and Prehistory Geosciences Centre, Maçao, Portugal. George has been a professional archaeologist for the past 25 years and has undertaken extensive fieldwork on prehistoric rock-art and mobility art in Chile, Denmark, Indonesia, Malaysia, Norway, Sardinia, Spain and Sweden. Between 1994 and 1997 he directed excavations at the La Hougue Bie passage grave on Jersey, one of Europe’s largest Neolithic monuments and has also directed preliminary excavations at Westminster Hall, London. He has also written, edited and co-edited many books on prehistoric art and monumentality including the most recent book entitled Archaeologies of Rock Art: South American Perspectives (2018). In the past George has been involved in a number of major rock-art recording and interpretation projects, the most recent being in the Central Negev region of southern Israel and in central Andean Chile. In his native Wales, he is convener for the Welsh Rock art Organisation (WRAO). In addition to fieldwork, he has also written and presented programmes on European rock-art and contemporary graffiti for the BBC.
NEW: Greek Art in Motion Studies in honour of Sir John Boardman on the occasion of his 90th Birthday edited by Rui Morais, Delfim Leão, Diana Rodríguez Pérez with Daniela Ferreira. Paperback; iv+510 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (230 colour plates). 485 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690231. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690248. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication on Greek Art gathers a large number of studies presented at the International Congress ‘Greek Art in Motion’. Held in honour of Sir John Boardman’s 90th birthday, the congress took place at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, 3-5 May, 2017.

The volume first presents eight contributions by the keynote speakers who, as friends and students of Sir John, present a debate and a problematisation of Greek Art from the archaeological and historical point of view.

Thereafter, 45 papers are divided into the different themes considered during the congress, all of which have greatly benefited from Sir John's researches throughout his long and distinguished academic career: Sculpture, Architecture, Terracotta and Metal, Greek Pottery, Coins, Greek History and Archaeology, Greeks Overseas, Reception and Collecting, Art and Myth.

About the Editors
RUI MORAIS was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in History, variant of Archaeology from the University of Coimbra. He has a Masters in Urban Archaeology, PhD in Archaeology, Technology and Materials from University of Minho. He was Professor at Minho University and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Among his research, he has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH). He was a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for antiques. He is a member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project.

DELFIM LEÃO is a Professor at the Institute of Classical Studies and a researcher at the Center for Classical and Humanistic Studies, University of Coimbra. His main areas of interest are ancient history, law and political theory of the Greeks, theatrical pragmatics, and the ancient novel. He also has a strong interest in digital humanities. Among his main recent works are D. F. Leão and P. J. Rhodes, ‘The Laws of Solon. A new Edition, with Introduction, Translation and Commentary’ (London, I. B. Tauris, 2015), and a second revised edition in 2016; D. F. Leão and G. Thür (Hrsg.) ‘Symposion 2015. Vorträge zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte’ (Wien, Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2016). Along with Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta, he is the editor of Brill’s ‘Plutarch Studies’.

DIANA RODRÍGUEZ PÉREZ is a Junior Research Fellow at Mougins Museum in Classical Art and Material Culture at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and was previously the Research Assistant for the Beazley Archive Pottery Database at the Classical Art Research Centre. Before moving to Oxford, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Edinburgh (FECYT). She received a PhD (Doctor Europaea) from the University of León, Spain (The Snake in the Ancient Greek World: Myth, Rite and Image), an MPhil in History of Art from the University of León, and an MPhil in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. From 2010 to 2011 she worked as a translator at the European Parliament in Luxemburg, and was a DAAD Fellow at the Institut für klassische Archäologie of the University of Heidelberg from 2008 to 2009. In the summer of 2017 she was Tytus Scholar at the Department of Classical Studies of the University of Cincinnati (US).

DANIELA FERREIRA is currently a PhD student at the Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archeology of Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, and a researcher at UI&D CITCEM - Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory», Portugal. She is also a recipient of a FCT (Portuguese national funding agency for science, research and technology) grant since 2015. Daniela holds a Master’s degree in Archaeology from the University of Oporto (Portugal), with a focus