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NEW: Par la bêche et le stylet! Cultures et sociétés syro-mésopotamiennes Mélanges offerts à Olivier Rouault edited by Philippe Abrahami and Laura Battini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300 pages; 139 figures; 18 tables (39 colour pages). 564 2019 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692822. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692839. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is a tribute to the career of Professor Olivier Rouault who has conducted extensive research in the fields of both Assyriology and Ancient Near Eastern archaeology. The book is composed of 25 papers written by his colleagues, friends and former students from Belgium, France, Great Britain, Italy, Israel, Japan, The Netherlands, Poland, Syria and the United States. The contributions presented here combine archaeological, iconographic and Assyriological studies from the Neolithic to the 1st millennium BC, covering whole of Mesopotamia and regions of Anatolia and the Levant. Nine papers deal with the data of Terqa, Mari and Qasr Shemamok, sites close to Professor Olivier Rouault’s main field of research. He published cuneiform tablets from Mari and Terqa and worked as a director of archaeological missions at Terqa and Qasr Shemamok. The book is divided into six main topics: Palace and Administration, Temples and Cults, Families and Societies, Literatures and Historiography, Representation and Symbolic Aspects, Cultural Markers and Stratigraphy – all the topics that attracted Professor Olivier Rouault during his fruitful career. More intimate texts recounting memories of moments shared with Olivier punctuate the reading of these contributions.

About the Editors
Philippe Abrahami is an Assyriologist, Professor of History and Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Lille, France (CNRS Laboratory HALMA UMR 8164).

Laura Battini is an archaeologist specialised in the Ancient Near East. She is currently a researcher at the French National Centre of Scientific Research (Laboratory PROCLAC, UMR 7192, directed by Thomas Römer). Laura created a new journal for the Ancient Near East (Ash sharq, Archaeopress), and is the editor of the archaeological series Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology.
NEW: Megaliths of the Vera Island in the Southern Urals by Grigoriev Stanislav and Vasina Yulia. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+284 pages; 223 figures; 34 tables (110 pages in colour). 559 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692426. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692433. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Megaliths of the Vera Island in the Southern Urals presents the results of the study of the largest megalithic complex in the Urals, located on Vera Island. The complex is represented by three chambered megaliths and sanctuaries dated to the Eneolithic period (mid-4th - 3rd millennium BC). The book discusses the features of the architecture and building technologies, their astronomical orientation, chronology, religious context, and explores their relation to social organisation and the possible migration of peoples. Small finds – especially the ceramic assemblages – are presented. The authors discuss problems associated with the origin of megaliths, the approaches of European researchers and the possibilities of applying these approaches to the Ural megaliths. Against the background of the lack of agriculture – in contrast to Europe – there was no demographic basis in the Urals for the emergence and existence of the megalithic phenomenon.

In addition to the megalithic complex, there are many unexplored objects on the island, the purpose of which remain, as yet, unclear. Ancient settlements of the same period have also been discovered on the island. The complex on Vera Island is unique precisely due to the combination of objects with so many different functions found within a relatively small area (6 ha).

About the Authors
Stanislav Grigoriev graduated from Chelyabinsk University in 1982. He began his scientific career at the same university, and since 1989 has been working at the Institute of History and Archaeology, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. He studied ancient metallurgy and the Bronze Age, and for many years participated in the excavations of such famous settlements as Sintashta and Arkaim. Since 2004, he has headed the research project of the megalithic complex on the Vera Island. His books Ancient Indo-Europeans, Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age and Holy Lalish are published in English.

Julia Vasina graduated from Chelyabinsk Pedagogical University, Faculty of History. Since 2003, she has led archaeological expeditions studying archaeological sites in the Urals. She is a leading expert in archaeology of the Ural cities and is the author of 38 works on archaeology, the history of the Urals and cultural studies. In 2004-2007, she was one of the leaders of the archaeological team on Vera Island. Based on this research, the island obtained the status of an object of cultural heritage. In 2014-2015, she was the scientific leader of the project for the restoration of the megalithic monuments of Vera Island.
NEW: The First Peoples of Oman: Palaeolithic Archaeology of the Nejd Plateau by Jeffrey I. Rose, Yamandú H. Hilbert, Anthony E. Marks and Vitaly I. Usik. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+198 pages; 142 figures; 27 tables (90 colour pages). 558 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692846. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692853. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In Dhofar, the southern Governorate of the Sultanate of Oman, the deep canyons cutting the Nejd plateau once flowed with perennial rivers, feeding wetland environments, forests, and grasslands across the now desiccated interior. The first peoples of Oman flourished along these waterways, drawn to the freshwater springs and abundant game, as well as the myriad chert outcrops with which to fashion their hunting implements and other tools. The landscapes of the Nejd Plateau are a natural museum of human prehistory, covered in carpets of chipped stone debris. The archaeological evidence presented in this work encompasses the cultural remains of over a million years of successive human occupations, from the Lower Palaeolithic to the Late Palaeolithic. Once considered an evolutionary backwater or merely a migratory way station, the archaeology of Dhofar requires a fundamental reconsideration of the role of Southern Arabia in the origin and dispersal of our species.

About the Authors
Jeffrey I. Rose, Research Scholar at the Ronin Institute, is specialized in the prehistory of North Africa and Southwest Asia. His research interests include modern human origins, stone tool technology and archaeogenetics. In recognition of his team’s discoveries in Oman, in 2012 Dr. Rose was named National Geographic’s Emerging Explorer.

Yemandù H. Hilbert, Associated Researcher at the Archeorient laboratory of French CNRS, has worked on the field across Eurasia and North Africa since 2005 and is specialized on the Late Paleolithic of Dhofar. His research interests include ethnography, prehistoric archaeology and physical paleoanthropology.

Anthony E. Marks, Conducted pioneering prehistoric research in the Nile Valley and southern Levant, producing seminal works on the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic periods in these regions. Since 2003, Prof. Marks has focused his research activities in the United Arab Emirates and Oman.

Vitaly I. Usik, Senior Researcher in the Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, is specialized in lithic technology, refitting and site survey and excavations. With more than four decades of fieldwork experience, he has carried out technological studies on a wide range of lithic assemblages from Northeast Africa, the Levant, Arabia and western Eurasia.
NEW: Messages from the Past: Rock Art of Al-Hajar Mountains by Angelo E. Fossati. Paperback; 210x297mm; xxx+304 pages; 398 figures; 10 maps; 1 table (215 colour pages). (Print RRP £58.00). 557 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692860. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692877. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £58.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Turtles, ibexes, ships, inscriptions... Thousands of engraved and painted figures intrigue visitors in the wadis of Al-Hajar Mountains. Who created these enigmatic figures and when were they made? What are their hidden meanings? For the first time, this volume tries to answer these questions. It is the result of the archaeological surveys and investigations undertaken by the author over the last ten years under the patronage of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture. In this book, the author takes the reader on an in-depth journey into the various themes present in the rock art of Oman. He offers theories on the chronology and interpretation, while exploring the landscape setting of the decorated panels and how best to research these. Several beautiful photographs and scientific tracings of the rock art accompany the text. The volume closes offering to enthusiasts and tourists a series of guided visits with GPS maps to the most interesting and visible rock art sites protected by Royal Decrees of the Sultanate.

About the author
Angelo E. Fossati is an Italian archaeologist specialized in rock art studies. He teaches Prehistory and Protohistory at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan (Italy) and researches mainly on Alpine megalithism and pre-Roman inscriptions. Dr Fossati has conducted rock art documentation and studies in several countries including Italy, France, Portugal and the USA. He has been consultant for the UNESCO Word Heritage Center and is President of «Footsteps of Man» an Italian rock art society member of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations. The author has published several papers and books on various rock art traditions. In Oman, he has conducted numerous surveys and documentation works under the patronage of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture in several areas of Al-Hajar Mountains.
NEW: Journeys Erased by Time: The Rediscovered Footprints of Travellers in Egypt and the Near East edited by Neil Cooke. Paperback; 160x230mm; xvi+350 pages; Illustrated throughout (89 colour pages). 557 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692402. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692419. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Members of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE), founded in 1997, continue to research, hold international conferences, and publish books and essays in order to reveal the lives, journeys and achievements of these less well-known men and women who have made such a contribution to the present day historical and geographical knowledge of this region of the world and who have also given us a better understanding of its different peoples, languages and religions.

The men and women from the past who are written about in this volume are a mixture of the incredibly rich or the very poor, and yet they have one thing in common, the bravery to tackle an adventure into the unknown without the certainty they would ever return home to their families. Some took up the challenge as part of their job or to create a new business, one person travelled to learn how to create and manage a harem at his house in London, others had no choice because as captives in a military campaign they were forced to make journeys into Ottoman controlled lands not knowing exactly where they were, yet every day they were looking for an opportunity to escape and return to their homes, while hoping the next person they met would guide them towards the safest route.

Apart from being brave, many of these men and women travellers have something else in common: they and others they encountered have left a collective record describing their travels and their observations about all manner of things. It is these forgotten pioneers who first gathered the facts and details that now fill numerous modern guidebooks, inflight magazines and websites.
NEW: Mediterranean Landscapes in Post Antiquity New frontiers and new perspectives edited by Sauro Gelichi and Lauro Olmo-Enciso. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+200 pages; illustrated throughout (87 colour pages). 555 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691900. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691917. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Mediterranean Landscapes in Post Antiquity: New frontiers and new perspectives highlights the fact that the study of landscape has in recent years been a field for considerable analytical archaeological experimentation. This new situation has made it possible to rethink the orientation of some theoretical approaches to the subject; equally these methods have been profitably used for the formation of a new theoretical and conceptual framework. These analytical trends have also featured in the Mediterranean area. Although the Mediterranean is the home of classicism (which also defines a particular archaeological methodology), it has seen the implementation of projects of this new kind, and in regions of Spain and Italy, after some delay, the proliferation of landscape archaeology studies. There are examples of more-or-less sophisticated postcolonial archaeological work, albeit conducted at the same time as examples of unreconstructed colonial archaeology. It is not easy to resolve a situation like this which requires the full integration of the different national archaeological cultures into a truly global forum. But some reflection on the cultural differences between the various landscape archaeologies, at least in the West is required. These considerations have given rise to the idea of this book which examines these themes in the framework of the Mediterranean area.

About the Editors
Sauro Gelichi is Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of Ca’ Foscari, Venice. He is main editor of Archeologia Medievale. His recent research interests and publications focus on the settlement in the Adriatic sea (i.e. Venice, Comacchio), particularly in the early medieval period. He has published proceedings of the International Conferences (From one Sea to Another. Trading Places in the European and Mediterranean Early Middle Ages, Turnhout 2012); Venice and its Neighbors from the 8th to the 10th Century. Through Renovation and Continuity, Leiden 2018) and archaeological editions of the archaeological excavations (Nonantola 6. Monaci e contadini. Abati e re. Il monastero di Nonantola attraverso l’archeologia (2002-2009), Florence 2018).

Lauro Olmo-Enciso is Professor of Archaeology at the Department of History and Philosophy, University of Alcalá, (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid). His lines of research and interests focuse on Medieval Archaeology, Historical Archaeology, Landscape Archaeology and Heritage. He directs archaeological excavations in different medieval sites, such as the Visigothic royal foundation of Recópolis; he was in charge of intervention projects in Spain-UNESCO World Heritage sites such as the ones related to the historical buildings of the University of Alcalá and the city of Segovia. He co-directs an Ecuadorian-Spanish project about the impact of colonialism on indigenous populations in Manabí (Ecuador). He has written and published many essays, editorial works, books, book chapters and articles in national and international scientific journals.
NEW: Hillforts: Britain, Ireland and the Nearer Continent Papers from the Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland Conference, June 2017 edited by Gary Lock and Ian Ralston. Paperback; 205x290mm; 250pp; 145 figures, 7 tables. 548 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692266. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692273. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Funded by the AHRC, the Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland project (2012-2016) involved a team drawn from the Universities of Oxford, Edinburgh and Cork which was responsible for compiling a massive database, now freely available online at https://hillforts.arch.ox.ac, on hillforts in Britain and Ireland. This was underpinned by a major desk-based re-assessment of accessible records. These twelve studies, presented at the end of that exercise to a conference in Edinburgh, and contributed by team members and colleagues, outline the background to and development of the project (Gary Lock) and offer a preliminary assessment of the online digital Atlas (John Pouncett) as well as presenting initial research studies using Atlas data. The volume is profusely illustrated with over 140 figures, including many new maps.

Ian Ralston provides a historical assessment of key stages in the enumeration and mapping of these important monuments on both sides of the Irish Sea. The hill- and promontory forts of England, Wales and the Isle of Man are assessed by Ian Brown and those of Ireland by James O’Driscoll, Alan Hawkes and William O’Brien. Stratford Halliday’s study of the Scottish evidence focuses on the impact of the application of the Atlas criteria to the records of forts in that country. Simon Maddison deploys Percolation Analysis as an example of the potential re-use of the Atlas data in analysing new distributions; Jessica Murray presents a GIS-based approach to hillfort settings and configurations.

Syntheses on insular Early Historic fortified settlements in northern Britain and Ireland, by James O’Driscoll and Gordon Noble, and on hillforts in areas of the nearer Continent are included. The latter comprise an overview by Sophie Krausz on Iron Age fortifications in France and a consideration of the south German records of hillforts and oppida by Axel Posluschny, while Fernando Rodriguez del Cueto tackles the north-western Spanish evidence.

About the Editors
GARY LOCK is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology, University of Oxford. He gained his first degree in Archaeology at the University of Leicester and then took his PhD based on post-excavation work at Danebury hillfort. His interest in the Iron Age and particularly hillforts and their landscapes resulted in thirty years teaching and researching at Oxford in both the School of Archaeology and the Continuing Education Department. Gary co-directed the Hillforts of the Ridgeway project which involved the excavation and publication of three hillforts: Uffington Castle; Segsbury Camp and Alfred’s Castle. Thereafter research at Marcham/Frilford, a large Iron Age ritual complex and Romano-British temple, necessitated eleven years of fieldwork. Post-excavation work on this community archaeology project is ongoing. Gary has also worked on hillfort projects in the Najera Valley, La Rioja (Spain) and the Sangro Valley (Italy). In recent years Gary has excavated a hillfort in North Wales, Moel-y-Gaer, Bodfari, which is currently being written up. He is a longstanding member of the Hillfort Study Group and was co-PI of the Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland project. Gary’s other major interest is the use of computers in archaeology, especially GIS on which he has published extensively. He has recently retired as Chair of the Computer Applications in Archaeology international conference.

IAN RALSTON’s doctorate was on the Iron Age enclosed sites of Limousin, France, following on from undergraduate studies in Stuart Piggott’s department at Edinburgh. For eleven years he was on the staff of the University of Aberdeen before transferring to Edinburgh in 1985, where he was appointed to a personal chair there in 1998 and as Abercromby Professor of Archaeology in 2012. Over his career he has primarily worked on various aspects of the prehistoric and early historic archaeology of eastern Scotland, including excavations at two promontory
NEW: Taming the Great Desert: Adam in the Prehistory of Oman by Guillaume Gernez and Jessica Giraud. Paperback; xiv+128 pages; 106 figures (colour throughout). (Print RRP £30.00). 538 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691801. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691818. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Located at the margins of the Rub Al-Khali desert, a place of interactions between settled and nomadic populations, the Adam oasis occupies a pivotal role in the history of Oman. However, almost nothing was known about its foundation and early developments. In 2006, the French Archaeological Mission in Central Oman began the exploration of the area. After ten years of field research using innovative methods and technologies, much is now revealed about the importance of Adam in the prehistory and early history of Oman. This is the first monograph about the research carried out at Adam and it includes seven chapters written by specialists directly involved in the field activities. Each major period is described in detail, including evidence of Palaeolithic occupation, Neolithic settlements, Early and Middle Bronze Age necropolises, Iron Age ritual sites and also an ethnographic study of the traditional water sharing within the oasis.

About the Authors
GUILLAUME GERNEZ is associate professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne and Director of the French Archaeological Mission in Central Oman. A former researcher at the French Institute for the Near East in Beirut, he specializes in protohistoric periods, material culture and funerary customs. For more than fifteen years, he has participated in archaeological excavations, surveys and material studies in Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and Oman. He has published books on the prehistory and antiquity of Lebanon (2010) and the history and early developments of weapons in the ancient Near and Middle East (2017).

JESSICA GIRAUD is associated researcher at the Laboratory Archaeology and Sciences of Antiquity (CNRS / University Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne) and is CEO and founder of the company ArCHaios — Archaeology, Culture & Heritage. She has been working on the archaeology of Oman for fifteen years, researching mainly on landscape archaeology in the Ja’alan province and in the Adam oasis, where she conducted the very first surveys and excavations. Since 2012, she has worked in Kurdistan as Director of the French Archaeological Mission to the Governorate of Sulaimaniyah (Iraq), and she continues to work in Oman at Adam and Quriyat.
NEW: Magan – The Land of Copper Prehistoric Metallurgy of Oman by Claudio Giardino. Paperback; 210x297mm; xviii+182 pages; 150 figures, 14 tables (colour throughout). (Print RRP £40.00). 537 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 2. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691788. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691795. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The development of a prehistoric civilization in the Sultanate of Oman was strongly connected with the exploitation and the use of copper. The Oman Peninsula has several rich copper ore deposits that have been exploited since prehistoric times. The earliest evidence of metallurgical activities in Oman dates back to the end of the Neolithic period in the 4th millennium BC. Thanks to the availability of this precious raw material, Oman became one of the main copper sources for the entire Middle East during the Bronze Age. The cuneiform texts of Mesopotamia referred to Oman as the Land of Magan, a region where the precious copper was found in fabulous abundance. This volume describes the geography and environments of Oman, its rich copper ore deposits and the ancient mining and smelting techniques, and it also includes an overview of the physical properties of the different metals exploited in antiquity and of the analytical techniques used in archaeometallurgy. Moreover, the author presents for the first time a comprehensive and detailed typology of the metal objects discovered at sites in Oman dating to the millennia from the Neolithic up to the Early Iron Age, emphasizing the development of advanced alloying techniques in order to obtain artefacts with specific proprieties and appearance.

About the Author
CLAUDIO GIARDINO is Associate Professor of Prehistory and Protohistory at the University of Salento (Lecce, Italy), where he also teaches Prehistoric Archaeometallurgy at the Post-graduate School of Archaeology. He has participated in archaeological projects in many regions of Europe and Asia working on several aspects of archaeometallurgy. He has conducted extensive research on the beginning and early developments of copper-based technologies at several sites in the Sultanate of Oman, from the Neolithic period (Ras Al-Hamra and Wadi Shab) up to the Bronze and the Iron Ages (Ras Al-Hadd, Ras Al-Jinz, Al-Safah and Daba). He is the author of numerous scientific publications on prehistory and ancient metallurgy, including a handbook on the use of metals in the ancient world, books on mining and metallurgical spheres in the West Mediterranean, and studies on the early metallurgy of Southeastern Arabia.
NEW: Brass from the Past Brass made, used and traded from prehistoric times to 1800 by Vanda Morton. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+358 pages; 91 figures, 53 tables (10 pages in colour). 536 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691566. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691573. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Brass from the Past is not only a history of the use and production of brass, but more broadly an insight into the journey of this important metal in the context of a changing and modernising world.

The book follows the evolution of brass from its earliest forms around 2500 BC through to industrialised production in the eighteenth century. The story is told in the context of the people, economies, cultures, trade and technologies that have themselves defined the alloy and its spread around the world. It explores innovations, such as the distillation of zinc, that have improved the quality and ease of production. From national or religious priorities to exhaustion of raw material supplies, the themes from the past are echoed in our own world today. In the later centuries, the book shines a light on some of the more personal aspects of people, businesses and relationships that have influenced industry and its progress.

Above all the book reflects the enthusiasm, not just of the author, but of all brass enthusiasts across the world. The search for information has involved scrambling down Bohemian ravines, stumbling over brass-works debris under trees, and studying pre-civil-war artefacts in Virginia. Academics and experts from across the world have provided information, from China to Qatar and the USA to the Czech Republic.

Brass is a strong and attractive metal, which has been used to create items of great beauty and utility. It is hoped that the reader will come to value the qualities of this material which has become a passion for so many people around the world.

About the Author
Vanda Morton MA PhD is based in Oxford and offers an authoritative voice on the history and archaeology of brass. Her research has involved metallurgical research, fieldwork and international networking.

She draws on interpersonal skills developed early in her professional life in psychiatric healthcare, and on illustrating skills acquired during her later occupation in graphic design which culminated in an academic career in archaeology. Her international research has taken her to muddy fields, mountains, forests, and rushing streams, and into homes, castles, laboratories and museums. These adventures have exploited her enthusiasm for foreign languages, love of walking, and joy at meeting the many and various people who have introduced her to different cultures, sites and archaeological treasures.
NEW: La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana Ricerche archeologiche nell’isola di Ventotene 2 by Giovanni Maria De Rossi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 360 pages; 608 figures (256 pages in colour). Italian text. (Print RRP £65.00). 527 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 57. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691467. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691474. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana is presented in two parts. The first examines the topographical and technical problem of the water supply on the island of Ventotene, where there is an absence of natural springs. The second, consisting of separate entries, analyses the individual components of the water supply system built by the Romans on the island. The Roman installation developed in two phases alongside changes in life at the villa located at Ventotene: the first connected to a residence used for otium, the second to an official site of relegatio ad insulam.

The Roman architect exploited the island’s natural slope to collect rainwater in a large initial reservoir, later known as the ‘Cistern of the Prisoners’, surmounted by a vast catchment basin: from here a conduit departed which, through various branches, reached the ‘heart’ of the villa extending over the promontory of Punta Eolo and the port facilities. The water was channelled from the cistern by an extensive network of tunnels, dug, depending on the height, either wholly or partially into the tufa or built on the surface.

Even during the second phase, when the villa was turned into a large and elaborate residential complex used throughout the year, it could rely only on rainwater as a resource. The Roman architect was thus forced to increase the collection areas, attempting to capture as much water as possible. This was achieved by increasing the number of large initial collection tanks, dislocating them strategically around the island to ensure that each of the sectors with the highest residential density and main infrastructure installations had its own independent resource alongside the standard existing resources. The number of catchment basins also multiplied considerably along the route of the main conduit and its branches.

About the Author
Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Rome 1942), Full Professor of Topography of Ancient Italy at the University of Salerno, has published many articles and books on ancient and medieval topography. He has directed archaeological excavations in Italy, and he conceived and designed the Archaeological park and Historical-Archaeological museum at Ventotene island, where he has been director for over twenty years.

Italian Description
La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana si compone di due parti. Nella prima viene esaminato il problema topografico e tecnico relativo all’approvvigionamento idrico dell’isola di Ventotene, in rapporto alla sostanziale assenza di sorgenti d’acqua. Nella seconda, composta di schede, si analizzano le singole componenti del sistema idrico costruito dai Romani nell’isola. L’impianto romano va inserito nelle due fasi di vita della villa realizzata a Ventotene: la prima legata a una residenza per l’otium, la seconda a una sede ufficiale per la relegatio ad insulam. L’architetto romano sfruttò il naturale pendio dell’isola per raccogliere acqua piovana in un grande serbatoio iniziale, poi detto “Cisterna dei Carcerati”, sormontato da un vastissimo compluvio di raccolta: da qui partiva un condotto che raggiungeva, con varie diramazioni, il “cuore” della villa distesa sul promontorio di Punta Eolo e gli impianti portuali. Lo smistamento dell’acqua dal serbatoio venne affidato a una capillare rete di cunicoli, scavati, a seconda delle quote, interamente o parzialmente nel tufo oppure costruiti in superficie. Per aumentare notevolmente la quantità d’acqua messa a disposizione dell’impianto, si realizzarono lungo i condotti abbinamenti formati da compluvi di superficie e cisterne di raccolta. Potendo contare, anche per la seconda fase, in cui però la villa era stata trasformata in un grande e articolato complesso residenziale da utilizzarsi per tutto l’anno, sulla sola risorsa delle piogge, all’architetto romano di turno non rimase che l’espediente di aumentare i punti di raccolta, cercando c
NEW: Rus Africum IV. La fattoria Bizantina di Aïn Wassel, Africa Proconsularis (Alto Tell, Tunisia) Lo scavo stratigrafico e i materiali edited by Mariette de Vos Raaijmakers and Barbara Maurina. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+438 pages; 390 figures, 37 tables (143 colour pages). Italian text with English abstracts. (Print RRP £75.00). 515 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 58. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691153. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691160. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Aïn Wassel is the only rural site of Africa Proconsularis which has been excavated using the stratigraphic method and the detailed results are published in this volume thanks to an archaeological field survey of the surrounding rural region. The interpretation of the stratigraphic sequence of the excavated area was able to determine a precise chrono-typology of pottery and amphoras, and to outline the importance of the Vandal and Byzantine period, which was confirmed by additional data from the survey.

The excavation provided evidence of sustainable intensive mixed farming: an oil mill and press, a grain hand mill, a sundial, bones of cattle and dromedaries raised for labour, transport, milk, meat, skins, wool. Remains of fowl, such as a partridge and fragments of ash tree, pine and olive stones were found and analyzed. Local imitations of African Red Slip (ARS) wares were identified for the first time, and three new types of amphoras of large dimensions were discovered and classified as Aïn Wassel 1, 2 and 3. The excavation proved that in the 7th c. AD North Africa was still very active and dynamic, where regional trade used both fluvial and ground transportation. Until recently, this was considered a period of crisis, abandonment of the countryside and ruralization of cities; it was not so.

About the Editors
MARIETTE DE VOS RAAIJMAKERS, BA and MA Utrecht, PhD Leiden, is retired Full Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Trento (Italy) where she founded in 1994 the Laboratorio di Archeologia e Scienze Affini. She conducted archaeological fieldwork in Italy (Rome, Pompeii, Sicily, Isera, Tivoli, Ventotene) from 1968, in North Africa from 1994 and in Turkey from 2003-2005. Her research interests lie in domestic architecture and late-antique and rural archaeology in Tunisia, Algeria and Cilicia.

BARBARA MAURINA is Archaeological Curator at the Museo Civico di Rovereto Foundation. She received her BA in Roman Archaeology from the University of Trento, an advanced degree from the University of Trieste, her PhD in ‘Cultures of the Roman Provinces’ from the University of Siena and she has attended post-degree courses at the Institute of Archaeology of the University College London. She has been collaborator at various universities, museums and institutes and has taken part in several archaeological campaigns in Italy and abroad. Her main research interests include Roman and Late antique material culture, Roman wall coatings and fieldwork. In the years 1994-1996 she took part in the archaeological excavation of Aïn Wassel in Tunisia and afterwards she studied the amphorae coming from the site.

Italian Description
Fino ad oggi Aïn Wassel è l'unico sito rurale dell'Africa Proconsularis che è stato scavato con metodo stratigrafico, pubblicato in dettaglio e contestualizzato grazie al survey archeologico della regione circostante. L'interpretazione della sequenza stratigrafica dei 252 m2 scavati ha permesso di determinare una precisa crono-tipologia di vasellame e anfore, e di delineare l'importanza del periodo vandalo e bizantino, come confermato da altri dati provenienti dall'indagine sul campo.

Gli scavi dimostrano un'agricoltura mista intensiva sostenibile: un elemento di macina e una pressa olearia, una macina manuale per cereali, una meridiana, ossa di bovini e dromedari, allevati per lavoro, trasporti, latte, carne, pelli e lana. Resti di uccelli, come una pernice e frammenti di frassini, noccioli di pino e ulivo sono stati trovati e analizzati. Le imitazioni locali delle ceramiche di sigillata africana (African Red Slip) sono identificate per la prima volta durante lo scavo di Aïn Wassel e l'indagine sul campo nella regione circostante. Tre nuovi tipi di anfora di grandi dimensioni furono scoperti ad Aïn Wassel e classificati come Aïn Wassel 1, 2 e 3. Lo scavo dimostrò che nel 7°secolo il Nord Africa era ancora molto attivo e dinamico
NEW: A Painted Ridge: Rock art and performance in the Maclear District, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa by David Mendel Witelson. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+148 pages; 39 figures (31 colour pages). 91 2019 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 98. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692440. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692457. Book contents pageDownload

A Painted Ridge is a book about the San (Bushmen) practice of rock painting. In it, David Witelson explores a suite of spatially close San rock painting sites in the Maclear District of South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province. As a suite, the sites are remarkable because, despite their proximity to each other, they share patterns of similarity and simultaneous difference. They are a microcosm that reflects, in a broad sense, a trend found at other painted sites in South Africa. Rather than attempting to explain these patterns chiefly in terms of chronological breaks or cultural discontinuities, this book seeks to understand patterns of similarity and difference primarily in terms of the performative nature of San image-making. In doing so, the bygone and almost unrecorded practice of San rock art is considered relative to ethnographically well-documented and observed forms of San expressive culture. The approach in the book draws on concepts and terminology from the discipline of performance studies to characterise the San practice of image-making as well as to coordinate otherwise disparate ideas about that practice. It is a study that aims to explicate the nuances of what David Lewis-Williams called the ‘production and consumption’ of San rock art.

About the Author
David Mendel Witelson is a doctoral candidate with Professor David Pearce at the University of the Witwatersrand’s Rock Art Research Institute. His doctoral research is on hunter-gatherer rock art in the north Eastern Cape Province of South Africa with a focus on the role that image-making plays in establishing spatial connections and social relations. In addition to rock art, his research interests include the Holocene archaeology of southern Africa, archaeological method and theory, and the intersection of mainstream archaeological and rock art research. He has published previously in the fields of rock art and lithic analysis. David lives in Linden, Johannesburg.
NEW: El Mesolítico en Cantabria centro-oriental by Mercedes Pérez Bartolomé. Paperback; 203x276mm; Tomo I: 402 pages; Tomo II (online): 770 pages; full colour throughout. Spanish text. 90 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692464. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692471. Book contents pageDownload

This book explores the Mesolithic period in the central-eastern area of Cantabria (Spain) as a manifestation of sociocultural evolution and change of the societies that lived in the area between the ninth and sixth millennia cal BC, until the introduction of farming. It analyses the subsistence and sociocultural transformations made by hunter-gatherer societies in their adaptation to the environment that emerged from the climate change seen during the Holocene. It also considers the evolutionary processes undergone by social groups based on their experiences and cognitive processes.

Mercedes Pérez Bartolomé holds a degree in Geography and History and a PhD in Archeology and Prehistory from the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED) Madrid (Spain).

Spanish Description
En esta libro se aborda el estudio del Mesolítico en la zona centro-oriental de Cantabria como una manifestación de evolución y cambio sociocultural de las sociedades que habitaron la región entre el IX y VI milenios cal BC, hasta la instauración de la economía productiva. Se analizan las trasformaciones económicas y socioculturales que efectuaron las sociedades de cazadores-recolectores, en su adaptación al medioambiente surgido del cambio climático del Holoceno, sin olvidar los procesos evolutivos que experimentan los grupos sociales basados en sus experiencias y procesos cognitivos.

Desde el descubrimiento de yacimientos de conchero en la región cantábrica, la investigación se ha centrado en el oriente de Asturias, donde se definió una cultura local, el Asturiense, que se extendió como ámbito cultural a toda la región cantábrica. De tal modo que, la investigación en Cantabria ha consistido en un reducido número de excavaciones de yacimientos, que en parte se encuentran en proceso de estudio.

Este vacío en la investigación del Mesolítico en Cantabria, es por lo que nos planteamos abordar el estudio de este poblamiento en un marco geográfico que se extiende desde la ría de Suances por el oeste, que planteamos como límite geográfico del Mesolítico Asturiense, y la de Ontón por el este, límite geográfico con el País Vasco Atlántico.

La investigación se ha basado en la realización de Proyectos de arqueología espacial con los objetivos de localizar nuevos yacimientos, verificar el estado de conservación y, la recopilación de datos arqueológicos de cada uno de los yacimientos reconocidos, que se recoge en el registro arqueológico, que debido a su mala conservación y exposición a procesos erosivos, están en peligro de desaparecer. Proyectos de excavaciones arqueológicas en yacimientos situados en diferentes contextos (costa, llanura litoral y montaña), en los que se han realizado estudios multidisciplinares que aportan información sobre paleoambiente, el patrón económico, las industrias, el pensamiento simbólico y el patrón de asentamiento. Se han obtenido fechas de radiocarbono en cada uno de los valles que forman el territorio y en diferentes entornos geográficos. Se aportan 18 nuevas dataciones para el Mesolítico en la región cantábrica.

Mercedes Pérez Bartolomé es licenciada en Geografía e Historia y doctora en Arqueología y Prehistoria por la Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED) Madrid (España).
NEW: Ash-Sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East Vol 3 No 1-2 2019 Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+120 pages; illustrated throughout (28 pages in colour). 3 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692006. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692013. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Please note printed issues 1-2 are despatched as two individual volumes. Upon completion the digital journal is presented in one volume containing both issues (digital file currently contains only Vol 3 No 1; Vol 3 No 2 expected in Autumn 2019).

Note for institutional subscribers: Please be sure to log in first via your institution's unique URL - this page will then display download options. Otherwise only purchase options will display. If you experience difficulties logging in please consult your librarian or contact Archaeopress directly via the following email: info@archaeopress.com

NEW: Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 49 2019 Papers from the fifty-second meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held at the British Museum, London, 3 to 5 August 2018 edited by Daniel Eddisford. Paperback; 206x255mm; viii+308 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (118 colour pages). PSAS49 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692303. £69.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692310. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £78.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies is the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. First convened in 1968, it is the only annual academic event for the study of the Arabian Peninsula that brings together researchers from all over the world to present and discuss current fieldwork and the latest research. The Seminar covers an extensive range of diverse subjects that include anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, numismatics, theology, and more besides, from the earliest times to the present day or, in the fields of political and social history, to around the end of the Ottoman Empire (1922). The Seminar meets for three days each year, with an ever-increasing number of participants coming from around the globe to attend. In 2018 the fifty-second meeting took place, in which fifty-seven papers and posters were presented in London at the British Museum, where this prestigious event has been hosted since 2002.
NEW: Archéologie de la Bible hébraïque Culture scribale et Yahwismes by Christophe Lemardelé. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+116 pages; 2 colour plates. 553 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692280. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692297. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Since the Renaissance, the question of how the Bible was written has been much debated. Documentary theory of the end of the 19th century identified "authors" and schools of writing, paving the way so that, a century later, a complex reality emerged, that of scribes modifying texts as they copied them. Thus, “The Bible” no longer appears as a controlled theological and historiographical project but as the empirical arrangement of heterogeneous texts linked together by an evolving religious ideology. While the great overall account of the first books is based on the election and migration of an entire people, the ideological foundations of Yahwism evoke rather a foreign god who, having reached Israelite territory, ultimately gained pre-eminence there.

This monotheistic ideology was above all an exclusivism that was to be reinforced from the time of the kings of Israel and Judah to the Judean revolts against Rome in the first centuries of our era. In our attempt to understand the nature and origin, as well as the evolution, of this specific form of monotheism, which made of a jealous god the only God, we have relied predominantly on the concept of the “two yahwisms”. This theory enables us to understand how a god allied with a people has also been a creative god of the universe and of all humanity.

Après la formidable avancée que fut la théorie documentaire à la fin du xixe siècle, identifiant des « auteurs » et des écoles de rédaction, un siècle plus tard, la théorie a laissé de plus en plus la place à un réel complexe, celui des scribes modifiant les textes à mesure qu’ils les copiaient. « La Bible » n’apparaît plus alors comme étant un projet théologique et historiographique maîtrisé mais comme l’agencement empirique de textes hétérogènes reliés entre eux par une idéologie religieuse évolutive. Si le grand récit d’ensemble des premiers livres se construit sur l’élection et la migration d’un peuple en son entier, les fondements idéologiques du yahwisme font plutôt état d’un dieu étranger qui serait parvenu jusqu’en terre israélite pour, à terme, s’y imposer.

Cette idéologie monothéiste fut surtout un exclusivisme qui se renforça de l’époque des rois d’Israël et de Juda jusqu’aux révoltes judéennes contre Rome aux premiers siècles de notre ère. Pour tenter de saisir la nature et l’origine, ainsi que l’évolution, de cette forme spécifique de monothéisme, qui a fait d’un dieu jaloux le seul Dieu, nous nous sommes appuyé avant tout sur le concept des « deux yahwismes ». Cette théorie permet en effet de comprendre comment un dieu faisant alliance avec un peuple en particulier a pu être également un dieu créateur de l’univers et de l’humanité entière.

About the Author
Christophe Lemardelé has a PhD in religious sciences (2007) and the title of “Élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jerusalem” (2002-2003). He has directed seminars at the École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris, from 2011 to 2016, and published Les cheveux du Nazir in 2016, as well as numerous articles in philology, exegesis and the history of religions.

Docteur en Sciences religieuses (2007), élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jérusalem (2002-2003), l’auteur a été chargé de conférences à l’École pratique des hautes études à Paris, de 2011 à 2016, et a notamment publié Les cheveux du Nazir en 2016, ainsi que de nombreux articles philologiques, d’exégèse et d’histoire des religions. Docteur en Sciences religieuses (2007), élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jérusalem (2002-2003), l’auteur a été chargé de conférences à l’École pratique des hautes études à Paris, de 2011 à 2016, et a notamment publié Les cheveux du Nazir en 2016, ainsi que de nombreux articles philologiques, d’exégèse et d’histoire des religions.
NEW: Ceramics in Transition: Production and Exchange of Late Byzantine-Early Islamic Pottery in Southern Transjordan and the Negev by Elisabeth Holmqvist. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+196 pages; 61 figures, 4 tables + illustrated appendices (25 pages in colour). (Print RRP £35.00). 552 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692242. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692259. Book contents pageDownload

Ceramics in Transition focuses on the utilitarian ceramic traditions during the socio-political transition from the late Byzantine into the early Islamic Umayyad and ‘Abbasid periods, c. 6th–9th centuries CE in southern Transjordan and the Negev. These regions belonged to the Byzantine province of Palaestina Tertia, before Islamic administrative reorganisation in the mid-7th century. Cooking ware and ceramic containers were investigated from five archaeological sites representing different socio-economic contexts, the Jabal Harûn monastery, the village of Khirbet edh-Dharih, the port city of ‘Aqaba/Aila, the town of Elusa in the Negev, and the suburban farmstead of Abu Matar. The ceramics were typo-chronologically categorised and subjected to geochemical and micro-structural characterisation via X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (ED-XRF) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS) to geochemically ‘fingerprint’ the sampled ceramics and to identify production clusters, manufacturing techniques, ceramic distribution patterns, and material links between rural-urban communities as well as religious-secular communities. The ceramic data demonstrate economic wealth continuing into the early Islamic periods in the southern regions, ceramic exchange systems, specialized manufacture and inter-regional, long-distance ceramic transport. The potters who operated in the southern areas in the formative stages of the Islamic period reformulated their craft to follow new influences diffusing from the Islamic centres in the north.

About the Author
ELISABETH HOLMQVIST holds a PhD (2010) in Archaeological Science from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, and MA and BA degrees in Archaeology from the University of Helsinki. She works as a post-doctoral researcher at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Finland. Her research interests are broadly in archaeological science, ancient craft technologies and identifying mobility of objects and people in archaeological data. She carries out archaeological fieldwork in Finland, Israel and Jordan.
NEW: Hadrian’s Wall: A study in archaeological exploration and interpretation by David J. Breeze. Paperback; 175x245mm; vi+190 pages; 125 figures, 4 tables (79 plates in colour). (Print RRP £19.99). 543 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691672. £19.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691689. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The lectures on which this publication is based were delivered as the Rhind Lectures to the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland in May 2019. The annual Rhind Lectures commemorate Alexander Henry Rhind (1833-1863), a Fellow of the Society renowned for his excavations (finds from which are now in the National Museum of Scotland) and publications. The 2019 lectures were generously sponsored by AOC Archaeology Group.

The first two lectures – chapters in this book – provide the historiographical background to our present understanding of Hadrian’s Wall. They start with John Collingwood Bruce, the leading authority on the Wall, from 1848 until his death in 1892, who gave the Rhind lectures in 1883 and whose influence continues to this day. Research on the Wall in the field and in the study from 1892 to the present day are covered in the second lecture. The third and fourth lectures consider the purpose(s) and operation of Hadrian’s Wall from the first plan drawn up soon after Hadrian became emperor in 117 through to the final days of its existence as a frontier shortly after 400. Five distinct ‘plans’ for the Wall are promulgated. The fifth lecture examines the impact of the frontier on the people living in its shadow and beyond. The last lecture reviews the processes which have brought us to an understanding of Hadrian’s Wall and considers the value of research strategies, with some suggestions for the way forward. The chapters in this book reflect closely the lectures themselves with the main change being the addition of references.

About the Author
DAVID J. BREEZE has been a trustee of the Senhouse Museum Trust since its inception in 1985 and chair of the trust since 2013. He has served as President of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society and as Chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier. He was Chief Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Scotland from 1989 to 2005, and subsequently led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site in 2008. David has excavated on both Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall and written several books on these frontiers, on frontiers elsewhere in the Roman Empire and on the Roman army.
NEW: Excavation of Later Prehistoric and Roman Sites along the Route of the Newquay Strategic Road Corridor, Cornwall by Andy M. Jones. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 526 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691528. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691535. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Ryan S Smith, Dana Challinor, Julie Jones, Graeme Kirkham, Anna Lawson-Jones, Henrietta Quinnell and Roger Taylor.

During November and December 2014, the Cornwall Archaeological Unit undertook a programme of archaeological excavation in advance of construction of a road corridor to the south of Newquay. Evidence for Middle Bronze Age occupation took the form of a hollow-set roundhouse; however, the majority of the excavated features have been dated to the Iron Age and Roman periods. The area was enclosed as fields associated with extensive settlement activity throughout the last centuries cal BC into the third century AD.

The excavations revealed the character of settlement-related activity during the later prehistoric and Roman periods. The evidence strongly suggests growing intensification of agriculture, with ditched fields and enclosures appearing in the landscape from the later Iron Age and into the Roman period.

The results shed light on later prehistoric and Roman practices involving the division of the landscape with ditched fields and enclosed buildings. Many of the structures and pits were found to be set within their own ring-ditched enclosures or hollows, and the field system ditches were in some instances marked by ‘special’ deposits. As has previously been demonstrated for Middle Bronze Age roundhouses, structures could be subject to formal abandonment processes. Gullies and hollows were deliberately infilled, so that they were no longer visible at surface. However, unlike the abandoned Bronze Age roundhouses, the later structures appear to have been flattened and not monumentalized. In other words, buildings could be both etched into and subsequently erased from the landscape and thereby forgotten.

This volume takes the opportunity presented by investigations on the Newquay Strategic Road to discuss the complexity of the archaeology, review the evidence for ‘special’ deposits and explore evidence for the deliberate closure of buildings especially in later prehistoric and Roman period Cornwall. Finally, the possible motives which underlie these practices are considered.

About the Author
ANDY M. JONES is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His research interests include the Neolithic, Bronze Age periods, as well as the archaeology of the uplands and coastal areas of western Britain. His recent research includes the log coffin dating project and the publication of the Whitehorse Hill cist, Preserved in the Peat: An Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill (2016). In 2017 he co-edited An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas. Other recent publications include Settlement and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond: New evidence from Tremough, Cornwall (2015) and Archaeology and Landscape at the Land’s End, Cornwall (2016).
NEW: The Secret Life of Memorials: Through the Memory Lens of the Australian South Sea Islanders by Julie Kaye Mitchell. Paperback; 205x290mm; 186pp; 112 figures, 24 tables (colour and black & white images throughout). (Print RRP £36.00). 508 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690958. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690965. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £36.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Australian South Sea Islander (ASSI) minority community has a contested indentured labour background and involvement in the Australian sugar cane industry which has resulted in a consequent paucity of material culture and other records. This paucity, in a sense, forms a substantive part of The Secret Life of Memorials: Through the Memory Lens of the Australian South Sea Islanders as it is argued that memory places, rather than static artefactual stand-ins for the past, are dynamic material culture which have agency and relevance in the present, participating in the on-going post-colonial process. Although a material culture study focused on the materialised expression of memory, this research allows discussion beyond typologies, styles and categories to consider the relational meaning and distributed agency of these objects within the complex network of public memory. In addition to considerations of their symbolic, mnemonic or representational reflections of the past, contemporary memorials are discussed as extensions of the original ASSI event to which they refer, a part of a continuous process that is helping to shape current communities. This encompassing approach, from historical experience to present day memory enactment strategies, employs a variety of theoretical arguments, contributing a new method for comprehending and including the many interleaving aspects of memory spaces, of inte rest to heritage professionals, local councils and governing bodies, and members of the general public.

About the Author
JULIE MITCHELL achieved her doctorate in the Department of Archaeology, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. A fascination with the human condition and the connections between past and present that manifest in contemporary life guided her research focus on the role of material culture in the construction and maintenance of memory. Julie is also an IPinCH fellow (intellectual property in cultural heritage), focused on the otherwise intangible cultural heritage information that material culture contains. Julie is currently working on another relatively unrepresented group, children living on colonial Australian gold fields, linking modern perceptions of Australian culture and identity, and those created, adopted and passed on by these ‘golden’ children.
NEW: The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Text and Archaeology by Justin L. Kelley. Paperback; 175x245mm; 47 figures, 1 table (Black & white throughout). (Print RRP £48.00). 489 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690569. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690576. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, was built by the Byzantine emperor Constantine I to commemorate the Passion of Jesus Christ. Encased within its walls are the archaeological remains of a small piece of ancient Jerusalem ranging in date from the 8th century BC through the 16th century AD, at which time the Turkish Ottoman Empire ushered Jerusalem into the modern period. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was the subject of extensive archaeological investigation between 1960 and 1981 during its restoration. With the development of non-destructive techniques of archaeological research, investigation within the church has continued, which led to the restoration and conservation of the shrine built over the Tomb of Jesus in 2017. The first part of this monograph focuses on the archaeological record of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, surveying past excavations as well as recent research carried out within the church over the past three decades. The archaeological survey provides historical context for the second part of the book—a collection of primary sources pertinent to the history of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The texts included here range in date from the 1st century AD to the mid-19th century and are presented in their original languages with English translation.

About the Author
JUSTIN L. KELLEY teaches classes in Christian history and biblical studies at Life Pacific College. Justin specializes in the history and culture of the ancient Near East and spent several years as a student in Israel, where he studied biblical historical geography and archaeology at Jerusalem University College and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
NEW: El sol, símbolo de continuidad y permanencia: un estudio multidisciplinar sobre la figura soliforme en el arte esquemático de la Provincia de Cádiz by Mercedes Versaci. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+208 pages; 156 figures, 38 tables (151 colour pages); Spanish text. 89 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691948. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691955. Book contents pageDownload

The purpose of this study is to analyze the soliform figures in schematic cave paintings. The author presents research on all the global factors relevant to the study of these figures (technological, typological, stylistic, semiotic, astronomical, anthropological and landscape) and their relationship with the whole of schematic rock paintings and the societies that produced them. The geographical scope of the study is the area of Laguna de la Janda and Campo de Gibraltar (Cadiz).

One of the arguments the author maintains in this research is the shortage of studies conducted in the territory of Cadiz in relation to these figures – and to rock art in general, which has been a central motif in almost all primitive religions or mythologies since the birth of agricultural societies. The recurrence of abstract motifs within the rock art of this area, and its durability over time, could be an indication of common cultural patterns among the different populations that inhabited the province. But these same signs are also repeated in different parts of the world – could it therefore suggest universal aspects of our species?

The interpretation of these symbols has been – and continues to be – subject to intangible or subjective issues; therefore, it is not exempt from possible projections of our own culture. We think that we are able to approach, in a scientific way, the ritual and symbolic aspects of those who elaborated these paintings. In this book, the author proposes an alternative according to the theoretical framework of disciplines such as ethnography, anthropology, landscape archaeology, archaeoastronomy and semiotics.

La finalidad de este estudio es el análisis de la figura soliforme en el arte rupestre esquemático. Presentamos una investigación global atendiendo a todos los factores susceptibles de estudio (tecnológicos, tipológicos, estilísticos, semióticos, astronómicos, antropológicos y paisajísticos) de esta figura y de su relación con el conjunto del arte rupestre esquemático y con las sociedades autoras del mismo. El ámbito geográfico de nuestro estudio será el entorno de la Laguna de la Janda y el Campo de Gibraltar (Cádiz).

Uno de los argumentos que esgrimimos para la realización de esta investigación es la escasa producción de estudios realizados en el territorio gaditano en relación a esta figura- y al arte rupestre en general- que ha sido motivo central en casi todas las religiones o mitologías primitivas desde el nacimiento de las sociedades agropecuarias. La recurrencia de los motivos abstractos dentro del arte rupestre de la zona que nos ocupa, y su perduración en el tiempo, podría ser indicio de patrones culturales comunes entre las diferentes poblaciones que habitaron nuestra provincia. Pero estos mismos signos también se repiten en diferentes partes del mundo. ¿Podríamos estar hablando de aspectos universales de nuestra especie? Somos conscientes que la interpretación de este símbolo ha estado y está sujeta a cuestiones subjetivas o intangibles, por consiguiente, no exenta de posibles proyecciones de nuestra propia cultura. Creemos que estamos en condiciones de aproximarnos de una manera científica a los aspectos rituales y simbólicos de aquellos que elaboraron estas pinturas, proponiendo una alternativa desde los marcos teóricos de disciplinas como la Etnografía, la Antropología, la Arqueología del Paisaje, la Arqueoastronomía y la Semiótica.

About the Author
MERCEDES VERSACI received her Ph.D. from the University of Cádiz in 2018 and she is an active member of the research group HUM 812: Studies in Prehistory, Archeology, Ethnoarchaeology, Anthropology and Cultural Landscape (PAEAPC) at the same institution. Her studies on the rock art of the Province of Cádiz go back to the year 2007, and she has published (in specialist magazines) several researches concerning paintings and funeral customs in recent prehistory. She has participated in vari
NEW: Current Research in Egyptology 2018 Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Symposium, Czech Institute of Egyptology, Faculty of Arts, Charles University, Prague, 25–28 June 2018 edited by Marie Peterková Hlouchová, Dana Belohoubková, Jirí Honzl, Vera Nováková. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+252 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (104 colour pages). 88 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692143. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692150. Book contents pageDownload

Current Research in Egyptology 2018 is a collection of papers and posters presented at the nineteenth symposium of the prestigious international student conference, held at the Faculty of Arts, Charles University in Prague on 25th–28th June 2018. The Prague conference was attended by more than 100 people from various countries and institutions. The range of topics discussed was wide, covering all periods of ancient Egyptian and Nubian history and various topics concerning their society, religious life, material culture and archaeological excavations. The event also included six keynote lectures by experts from the Czech Institute of Egyptology, the FA CU (Prof. Mgr. Miroslav Bárta, Dr., Doc. PhDr. Hana Vymazalová, Ph.D., Doc. PhDr. Jana Mynářová, Ph.D., Prof. PhDr. Ladislav Bareš, CSc., and PhDr. Filip Coppens, Ph.D.) and the University of Vienna (Ao. Univ.-Prof. Dr. Peter-Christian Jánosi). The Egyptological meeting was enriched with a visit to the Karolinum, historical buildings of Charles University.
NEW: La defensa de la ciudad de Valencia 1936-1939 Una arqueología de la Guerra Civil Española by José Peinado Cucarella. Paperback; 203x276mm; 236 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (51 colour pages). Spanish text. 87 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692020. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692037. Book contents pageDownload

This publication presents the defense of the city of Valencia during the years 1936-1939 under two premises; whether Valencia was strategically bombed and which were the targets. The second premise is whether the city was efficiently organized to protect its civilians.

The methodological proposal is based on the use of the classical parameters of the archaeological intervention, with the possibility of elaborating catalogs of goods, thematic, temporary, etc. Those derived in tools for urban planning, archaeological charts, and other documents.

It also carries out a comparative analysis of the current legislative framework at national and regional level (Murcia, Valencia and Catalonia). A classification is made of the elements that make up the different heritages and their main characteristics.

It Analyzes the documentation from 1936 to 1939 collected in the different archives: the Municipal of Valencia, the Diputación, the Historical Military of Ávila, the Intermediate Military of Valencia, the Military Library "Center of Cultures", the Hemeroteca Municipal and The Library of the City of Valencia.

All this is done through extensive prospecting and GPS, with planimetric surveys of the localized remains and the digitalization of the entire planimetry of the time. A planimetric map of all shelters in the city is elaborated and the village of Puig. Moreover, a glossary of military terminology is added with the purpose of helping the reader, in addition to a daily list of the bombings that the city suffered during the years 1937 to 1939.

Esta publicación nos muestra la defensa de la ciudad de Valencia durante los años de 1936-1939 bajo dos premisas; una que es saber cuales fueron los más sensibles y bombardeados y si responden a la idea de un bombardeo estratégico. La segunda premisa es si la ciudad dispuso de una organización eficiente para proteger a su población civil. La propuesta metodológica se basa en la utilización de los parámetros clásicos de la intervención arqueológica, con la posibilidad de elaborar catálogos de bienes, temáticos, temporales, etc... que puedan derivar en herramientas para el planeamiento urbanístico, en cartas arqueológicas, y demás documentos.

En ella también se realiza una análisis comparativo del marco legislativo actual tanto a nivel nacional como autonómico (Murcia, Valencia y Cataluña). Se realiza una clasificación de los elementos que conforman los distintos patrimonios y sus principales características con el fin de disponer de una base teórica donde situar los restos arqueológicos y documentales localizados, distinguiendo su naturaleza en activa (militar) centros de Resistencias, Defensa de Costa y aeródromos, y por otra la pasiva (civil) como los refugios.

Se han analizado la documentación referente a 1936 a 1939, recogida en los diferentes archivos, el Municipal de Valencia, el de la Diputación, el Histórico Militar de Ávila, el Militar Intermedio de Valencia, La Biblioteca Militar ‘Centro de Culturas’, la Hemeroteca Municipal y La Biblioteca Valenciana.

Todo ello se realiza mediante la prospección extensiva y mediante GPS, con levantamientos planimétricos de los restos localizados y la digitalización de toda la planimetría de la época. Se establece como unidad gestora de la documentación el GvSIG, un software libre, que permite combinar datos geográficos, bases de datos con datos vectoriales y raster. Y se elabora una cartoteca planimétrica de todos los refugios conocidos en la ciudad de Valencia, y de los elementos más esenciales de la defensa activa del municipio del Puig. Así como un glosario de terminología militar con el objeto que ayude al lector y un listado diario de los bombardeos que sufrió la ciudad durante los años 1937 a 1939.

About the Author
JOSÉ PEINADO is a PHD in archaeology in the University of Valencia and with a degree in History and an extensive experience i
NEW: ‘Isaac went out to the field’: Studies in Archaeology and Ancient Cultures in Honor of Isaac Gilead edited by Haim Goldfus, Mayer I. Gruber, Shamir Yona and Peter Fabian. Paperback; 205x290mm; xvi+402 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 6 colour plates. English text with Hebrew abstracts. 546 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918293. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918309. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

‘Isaac went out to the field (Genesis 24:63)’ is a collection of 28 articles by 47 authors from research institutions in Israel and around the world honoring Professor Isaac Gilead on the occasion of his 71st birthday. The authors include the honoree’s mentors, colleagues, and students. Most of the articles deal with archaeological subjects, especially prehistoric and proto-historic archaeology, which are the focus of the honoree’s teaching and research. Reflecting the broad horizons of Gilead’s interests, the volume also includes studies in other subjects including the Bible and the ancient Near East, Second Temple literature, the history of biblical exegesis, and the influence of the Bible on contemporary Hebrew Literature.

About the editors HAIM GOLDFUS teaches classical archaeology in the Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. His main fields of interest and research are related to early Roman and Late Antique/ early Byzantine archaeology.

MAYER I. GRUBER is Professor Emeritus and Past Chair of the Department of Bible Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beer Sheva. His publications include Aspects of Nonverbal Communication in the Ancient Near East (2 vols.; Rome: Biblical Institute Press, 1980); The Motherhood of God and Other Studies (Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1992); Women in the Biblical World: A Study Guide (American Theological Library Association, Bibliography Series, no. 38; Lanham, MD, and London: Scarecrow Press, 1995); Rashi’s Commentary on Psalms (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2004); Women in Ancient Israel and Studies in Early Jewish Civilization, translated from English into Chinese by Shuqing Zhang (Beijing: China Social Sciences Press, 2009); The Women of Israel by Grace Aguilar with a New Introduction and Commentary (Piscataway, NJ: Gorgias Press 2011, 2013); and Hosea: A Textual Commentary (London: Bloomsbury T & T Clark, 2017).

SHAMIR YONA is Associate Professor in the Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. He served for two terms as Chair of that department and two terms as Head of the Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Studies Division in that department. He is Co-chair with Elad Filler of the Judaica Section for Society of Biblical Literature International Meetings. He is a member of the board of directors of the New Israel Society for Biblical Research. Yona’s publications focus on the poetics of Ancient Near Eastern literature; the wisdom literature of the Bible, the ancient Near East, and rabbinic literature; biblical prophecy and narrative; Ugaritic language and literature; and Semitic lexicography.

PETER FABIAN completed his studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in 2005 with a PhD dissertation concerning the Roman army camp in Oboda-Avedat. After working for many years in the Israel Antiquities Authority as a senior archaeologist and an advisor, he was given a tenure track position as a classical archaeologist in the Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, where he is currently a Senior Lecturer. Dr. Fabian combines his interests and expert knowledge and long track-record of fieldwork in Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and Early Islamic archaeology, together with excavations and studies concerning the protohistory of the Southern Levant, particularly the Chalcolithic period of the Negev and the Shephela lowlands of Israel.
NEW: Over the Mountains and Far Away: Studies in Near Eastern history and archaeology presented to Mirjo Salvini on the occasion of his 80th birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan, Roberto Dan and Yervand H. Grekyan. Paperback; 205x290mm; xviii+572 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (135 plates in colour). 545 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919436. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919443. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The publication of Over the Mountains and Far Away: Studies in Near Eastern history and archaeology presented to Mirjo Salvini on the occasion of his 80th birthday was initiated by the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, the International Association of Mediterranean and Oriental Studies (Rome, Italy) and the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies (Yerevan, Armenia) as a tribute to the career of Professor Mirjo Salvini on the occasion his 80th birthday. It is composed of 62 papers written by his colleagues and students from Italy, Germany, France, Spain, Poland, the Netherlands, Denmark, Austria, Great Britain, Russian Federation, Israel, Turkey, Islamic Republic of Iran, Georgia, United States and Armenia. The contributions presented here cover numerous topics, a wide geographical area and a long chronological period. However, most of the contributions deal with research in the fields of Urartian and Hittite Studies, the topics that attracted Prof. Salvini during his long and fruitful career most.

About the editors
PAVEL AVETISYAN is a leading archaeologist from Republic of Armenia. Area of his research is Old World archaeology, particularly Neolithic to Iron Age cultures of Armenia and Transcaucasia, problems of their periodisation and chronology. P. Avetisyan led various excavation projects in Armenia (Talin, Agarak, Karashamb, Godedzor, Masis Blur, and others). He received his PhD in 2003 (‘Periodisation and Chronology of the Middle Bronze Age of Armenia’) and Dr Habil. in 2014 (‘Armenian Highland during the 24-9th Centuries BC: The Dynamics of Socio-Cultural Transformations, according to Archaeological Data’). Prof. Avetisyan is currently Director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences, Republic of Armenia and Professor at the Yerevan State University. Publications include three monographs and more than 100 articles devoted to the mentioned problems.

ROBERTO DAN is a member of ISMEO – International Association of Mediterranean and Oriental Studies. He is an archaeologist specialised in architecture, history and landscape archaeology of the Near East, focused on the 1st millennium BC (Urartu, Achaemenid Empire). He obtained his PhD from the ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome, with a thesis on the archaeological landscape of Urartu. Roberto has conducted fieldwork in Armenia, Georgia, Turkey and Iran. He is director of the ISMEO – Archaeological Mission to South Caucasus (AMSC), a project co-financed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of the Italian Republic, which involves archaeological activities in Armenia (Kotayk Survey Project since 2013; Vayots Dzor Project since 2015) and Georgia (Samtskhe-Javakheti Project since 2017), with excavations in the Urartian sites of Solak 1 and Yelpin 1. In 2015, he published a book devoted to the analysis of historical and architectural relations between Urartu and the Achaemenid Empire.

YERVAND GREKYAN is a leading researcher at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Associate Professor at the Armenian State Pedagogical University. He received his PhD in 2002 (‘History of the Mannean Kingdom’) and defended his habilitation thesis on the structure of the Urartian Kingdom at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia in 2016 (‘Biainili-Urartu. State and Society’).Y. Grekyan is the author of more than 70 articles and book chapters devoted to the ancient history and culture of the Near East and especially of the Armenian Highland in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages. He is a founding member of the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies and vice-editor of Aramazd: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies.
NEW: Early Neolithic, Iron Age and Roman settlement at Monksmoor Farm, Daventry, Northamptonshire by Tracy Preece. Paperback; viii+82 pages; 53 figures, 27 tables (36 plates presented in full colour). 544 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692105. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692112. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Includes contributions from Rob Atkins, Andy Chapman, Mary Ellen Crothers, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Rob Perrin and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray; illustrations by Olly Dindol and Rob Reed.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) has undertaken archaeological work at Monksmoor Farm on the north-eastern edge of Daventry in six different areas. The earliest archaeological features lay in Area 6 at the southern end of the development area, where two pits were radiocarbon dated to the early Neolithic. They contained a moderate assemblage of worked flints along with sherds of early Neolithic pottery. In the middle Iron Age a settlement was established in the same location comprising a roundhouse and several enclosures.

Two other contemporary settlements are thought to have originated in the late Iron Age/ early 1st century BC and were identified in Areas 1 and 2 between c0.2km and 0.5km apart and 500m to the north of Area 6. Area 1 contained evidence for a cluster of eight roundhouses with associated enclosures clearly showing sequential activity, while in Area 2, a large ditched enclosure defined as a Wootton Hill type, within which another roundhouse was present. It is possible that the Wootton Hill type enclosure in particular may have a slighter earlier origin than the limited pottery assemblage suggests. Sparse early Roman features were also found in Areas 3, 4 and 5.

This settlement continued in use through the later 1st to 2nd century AD. During the early Roman period the settlement in Area 6 was greatly expanded with large rectilinear ditched enclosures along with smaller enclosures and paddocks being established on either side of a routeway indicating movement of livestock was important.
NEW: The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Moon: Coffin Texts Spells 154–160 by Gyula Priskin. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+254 pages; 4 tables, 1 figure. 542 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 22. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691986. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691993. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Moon proposes that Coffin Texts spells 154–160, recorded at around the beginning of the 2nd millennium BCE, form the oldest composition about the moon in ancient Egypt and, for that matter, in the entire world. The detailed analysis of these spells, based on a new translation, reveals that they provide a chronologically ordered account of the phenomena of a lunar month. It is argued that through a wide variety of mythological allusions, the separate texts – following an introduction which explains the origins of the month (spell 154) – describe the successive stages of the monthly cycle: the period of invisibility (spell 155), waxing (spell 156), events around the full moon (spell 157), waning (spell 158), the arrival of the last crescent at the eastern horizon (spell 159), and again the conjunction of the sun and the moon when a solar eclipse occurs (spell 160). After highlighting the possible lunar connotations of each spell, further chapters in the book investigate the origins of the composition, its different manuscripts preserved on coffins coming from Hermopolis and Asyut, and the survival of the spells in the later mortuary collection known as the Book of Going Forth by Day.

About the Author
GYULA PRISKIN has an MA in English language and literature from the University of Szeged, and started working as a language teacher in the early 1990s. For fifteen years he taught English at the business college in his hometown, Békéscsaba, Hungary. In the 1990s he also became interested in ancient Egypt and has been publishing his research in various journals since 1998. Lately his main focus of enquiry has been on astral myths, especially the role and significance of the moon in ancient Egypt. In 2012 he received an MA in Egyptology from Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, and now holds a PhD in the discipline from the same institution. Since 2016 he has been working as a teaching assistant at the Department of Ancient History, University of Szeged.
NEW: Bridging Science and Heritage in the Balkans Studies in Archaeometry and Cultural Heritage Restoration and Conservation edited by Nona Palincaş and Corneliu C. Ponta. Paperback; vi+156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 541 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691962. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691979. Book contents pageDownload

In a period when, particularly in the West, the study of archaeological remains is enriched through new methods derived from the natural sciences and when there is general agreement on the need for more investment in the study, restoration and conservation of the tangible cultural heritage, this book presents contributions to these fields from South-Eastern Europe. This region is characterised by a contrast between the rather limited development of the above scientific methods and the particularly rich and diverse material remains of its past societies, as well as by an obvious need to bring closer together traditionally-trained archaeologists with specialists in natural sciences interested in the research and conservation of ancient material remains. The title ‘Bridging Science and Heritage in the Balkans’ intends to show that the volume is part of this effort.

The departing point of this volume is the 5th Balkan Symposium of Archaeometry (25–29 September 2016, Sinaia, Romania), where most of the papers published here were presented in preliminary form. The contributors are specialists from South-Eastern Europe as well as from other European countries working there. Some chapters focus on methods (in the research of glass, restoration of stone monuments affected by contemporary graffiti, conservation by irradiation of organic materials such as wood and human and animal body remains); most chapters present case studies (analyses of ceramics, metals, soils, wood anatomy, isotope-based reconstruction of human diet, ancient DNA, radiocarbon dating, technology assisted field survey, as well as restoration of paper and pigments); sometimes several methods are combined. The volume covers nearly all aspects of heritage sciences employed in this part of Europe.

About the Editors
NONA PALINCAŞ is senior researcher with the Vasile Pârvan Institute of Archaeology of the Romanian Academy in Bucharest. Her research interests include both social archaeology (particularly gender, body practices, power, knowledge, agency and creativity in the south-east European Bronze and Iron Ages and in contemporary archaeology) and archaeometry (primarily radiocarbon dating and analysis of archaeological ceramics). She has conducted excavations in the pre- and protohistoric settlement at Popeşti (Romania), the Late Iron Age habitation of which was identified with Argedaon/Argedava − the residence of the father of the Dacian king Burebista. In various publications she has pleaded for stronger development of archaeological theory and of archaeometry in Romania and in South-Eastern Europe in general.

CORNELIU C. PONTA, PhD, chemical engineer, has worked for more than 40 years at the Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) in Măgurele, Romania. He established, developed and led the IRASM Radiation Processing Centre – a department orientated to research and development, treatments, consulting, promotion and implementation of applications of gamma irradiation. Among these the disinfection of cultural heritage by gamma irradiation is now an accepted conservation alternative in Romania. Recently he contributed to the book Uses of Ionizing Radiation for Tangible Cultural Heritage Conservation (IAEA, Radiation Technology Series No. 6, 2017).